"This field will become more difficult in years to come"

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Wants2Teach, Dec 28, 2012.

  1. Wants2Teach

    Wants2Teach Rookie

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    Dec 28, 2012

    I'm new here even though I made my first post a couple of months ago, but only now have I started to take advantage of these message boards.

    As you can guess by my user name I'm interested in becoming a teacher, and as people around me know of this fact I often hear them utter a variation of this thread's title. Often times, I'm unable to really get them to explain what they mean.

    I'm assuming they're talking about the No Child Left Behind Act. If so, what does this mean to you and your colleagues?
    As a newbie, is there anything else I should know about the changes in this field?

    Thank you so much!:thumb:
     
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  3. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Dec 28, 2012

    Well, a few things come to mind when I think about that statement. First, full Common Core implementation is around the corner. Most students aren't used to the amount of rigor involved in these standards so (for a while) it will be an uphill battle getting the kids to work at the level that the standards require.

    Also, many people see things like the shooting at Sandy Hook on the news and make assumptions that our society (as a whole) is declining morally. Students are more violent, obsessed with "shoot-em-up" video games, parents are disengaged and uninvolved, etc. Though I don't know if there's any actual data collected as to if these factors are on the rise, they are areas of concern. I know veteran teachers who say that the students are different from the students they taught when they first started their careers. They say students have become more disrespectful, less empathetic and more willing to engage in risky behaviors. Again, I think that's more of an observation than statistical evidence but....that could be what people who bring this up are alluding to.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 28, 2012

    Nclb is hardly mentioned currently. Right now it's common core, new evaluations for teachers, budget cuts, PARCC testing...
     
  5. Wants2Teach

    Wants2Teach Rookie

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    Dec 28, 2012

    As I understand these evaluations just have a more specific way of grading than the old ones did, so pretty much (at least in my state) teachers did the same as before; correct?

    What do Common Core requirements mean to you? Does this mean reporting lesson plans, and more paperwork for you to fill out?

    One thing I hear a lot from people who don't work in the field is that the scrutiny is all on the teachers shoulders to get the student grades up, despite lack of cooperation on the student's behalf. Would anyone like to comment on that?

    Thanks again!
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 28, 2012

    There's a lot in the media about high stakes testing...and bashing of teachrs by those who don't know about what they are judging. CCSS was pushed thru with very little training...as we're new teacher eval systems...as is PARCC testing.
    I
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Dec 28, 2012

    A big part about what worries me are the new directives coming down that require teacher evaluations to be based in whole or large part on student test scores. As someone who teaches in an urban school with historically low test scores, it worries me that 50% of my evaluation is going to be based on those. I suspect that if these sorts of policies spread, more teachers will either leave the field altogether or go to high-performing schools where the test scores are already high.
     
  8. waterfall

    waterfall Phenom

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    Dec 28, 2012

    That's my biggest concern as well...I enjoy the population I work with, but with my job being on the line because of test scores I would jump at the chance at a job in a higher SES district if by some miracle one opened up. If there were something else I could do around the same salary level without going back to school, I'd do it.
     
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Dec 28, 2012

    Bingo.

    I have long posted about my experience working in an urban school. In spite of, or maybe because of, the many challenges I face every day, I have always found a home for myself in an urban setting. I think that I am a good teacher in this sort of setting. Even with that, though, if my livelihood and my ability to support my family depend on it, I would jump ship in a heartbeat. My family isn't going to suffer just so that I can do my best work with at-risk kids.
     
  10. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Dec 30, 2012

    In my state the focus is on student growth; they presume to measure this by student performance in grades 3 through 8, on math and reading tests. Teachers in those areas (lucky me!) have what is called value added data which is part of our evaluation.

    My daughter, who recently graduated in HS ed, spent a year at a charter school but has now moved on to law school; I am very happy with her decision as the education field is rather bleak right now. (Don't get me wrong- I love teaching and working with my students, but the atmosphere has changed so much and I am tired of everything about me and my students coming down to a number.)
     
  11. geoteacher

    geoteacher Cohort

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    Dec 30, 2012

    What concerns me about the future of education? Lots of things - some of which have been mentioned above. Common Core, RtI, Differentiation, teacher evaluation, budget cuts are definitely some of the things on the radar. All of these things add stress to educators who are already feeling pressure from administration and parents. Does all this make me feel hopeless? No, but there are days when it feels like nothing I do will ever be enough.
     
  12. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Virtuoso

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    My parents retired from teaching about the same time NCLB started implementing tests. They just couldn't stomach the shift. I'm wary about the shift to Common Core in a similar way, but I'm sticking with it. The American public educational system has always had flaws, so it's a constant challenge to receive and give the best instruction possible within its parameters.
     

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