Teaching Children of Poverty - An add on endorsement

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Tyler B., Jan 8, 2018.

  1. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Devotee

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    South Carolina has an add-on endorsement for a standard teaching credential where a teacher can take courses to learn how to more effectively teach children who've grown up in economically distressed families.

    If you teach in a school with an economically distressed population, you might want to check out this amazing collection of research at the Francis Marion Center for Excellence.

    I'm trying to find any other state that does this. Do you know a program targeted to the needs of poor kids in your state?
     
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  3. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    This is fantastic Tyler - thanks for posting.
     
  4. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Phenom

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    It's not part of the state program, but we did a lot of work with Ruby Payne's resources on dealing with children of poverty. It was also a big part of a Title I conference I attended a few years ago.

    Dealing with children of poverty does require a specific set of skills and knowledge.
     
  5. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I've grabbed both the website and Payne's Poverty series so I can pass them along to my faculty. We're all well-versed in working with high-risk students, but more information never hurt anyone.

    Thank you!
     
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  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    Tyler, thanks for sharing. Would you mind doing just what you did here on the free links pinned thread? I'm swamped at the moment, but that is exactly the kind of resource that needs to be there. Your post explains it perfectly, too.
     
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  7. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    My school has dabbled in the Payne stuff, though I feel like I'm missing out on much more education on the matter.
     
  8. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Awesome resources Tyler
     
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  9. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    At least one of our local universities offers an education degree track called "urban education" (euphemism for high poverty, IME). In a previous building I worked in we got a lot of STs from that program. As far as I know, it's not an added endorsement, more just something you'd put on your resume.
     
  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    I am very interested in looking at Tyler's resources in depth when I have some time. I don't need an endorsement, but I am always interested in great resources.
     
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  11. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Devotee

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    I would like to see a special credential or endorsement required in order to teach low income kids. This would raise the training and prestige of teachers working with these populations.

    Currently, a brilliant, dedicated teacher working at a low income school is said to be contributing to a "failing" school. This appellation discourages young, red hot teachers from going into these schools.

    I called up the South Carolina state credentialing office and asked how many of these endorsements they issue. The woman who answered said only about 1 or 2 a year, if that. When I called the Francis Marion Center of Excellence, that offers the training, they said they couldn't keep up with the demand for their classes. So right now, teachers want the extra training, but have little interest in the endorsement.
     
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  12. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I think that might make less teachers available don’t you?
     
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  13. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    I see both points of view above, but I gotta say I love the idea of a specialty credential for poverty teaching skills... just because it really is so different. Requiring it for low-income skills might be better reserved for later down the road, but to view it as a perk when applying for jobs? Yes!
     
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  14. NewTeacher2016

    NewTeacher2016 Companion

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    What is the incentive for getting an endorsement or certification in this? B.F. Skinner behaviorism.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
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  15. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Devotee

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    Right now, there's really no incentive for teachers to get the endorsement. I think only South Carolina offers such a thing. Apparently, tons of teachers are looking for strategies and techniques that will help their poor kids learn.

    If states required a special endorsement in order to take a job at a low income school, I can imagine a possible end to the "churn" in staff that is too common at low income schools. The job would acquire a prestige that would attract and keep strong teachers.

    Now, no matter how hard highly skilled teachers work at their low income schools, their school can be labeled as failing. This removes most of the prestige from teaching this fragile population.
     
  16. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I think they’d rather get 10,000 more per year than the prestige of a cert. I have 6 different certs and none are considered any more prestigious than another.

    Give them the significant pay bump and you’ll get people.
     
  17. NewTeacher2016

    NewTeacher2016 Companion

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    That sounds about right. same reason why most teachers refused to get National Board. There is nothing prestige about teaching at a low-income school, an honorable action? sure, but not prestige
     
  18. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    This is exactly what I was just thinking. You also have to consider the fact that endorsements are very expensive to get in the first place. I'm totally willing to put in the work to move into the MA+20 column with an added endorsement, but with how expensive it is to get an endorsement, it doesn't really make financial sense. Not to mention, many districts around me have gone away from paying extra for advanced degrees and more graduate hours. I'd have to wait at least 5 years after earning the endorsement to actually start profiting from it, and who knows what things will look like in 5-6 years. It would be even longer for someone who needed to take out loans and pay interest.
     
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  19. NewTeacher2016

    NewTeacher2016 Companion

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    That's correct. I had a conversation with one of the vet teachers at my school yesterday and she admitted that it is a lot easier to do "less" than do "more" now, and that being a teacher is a really really really bad investment. You have to PAY to be a teacher.
     
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  20. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Devotee

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    I would stay away from negativity like that. Hang out with teachers who love their job and understand that they are doing the most important job in the world. I love my job and feel really lucky to be a teacher.
     
  21. heatherberm

    heatherberm Comrade

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    At the very least, my teacher prep program at least, could have done a much better job of preparing teachers to potentially teach high poverty populations. The most useful class I took in college was called Dynamics of Poverty, but it wasn't even part of my education degree, it was part of my minor. Definitely should be a required class. Thanks for sharing, Tyler!
     
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