Teachers, what are your thoughts?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by futuremathsprof, Sep 25, 2018.

  1. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    1,154

    Sep 30, 2018

    I have to agree with TeacherGroupie and Always here. With a wife that is a manager, and having worked in retail for a while myself, I know first hand that just simply firing an employee is not something that can happen willy-nilly everywhere, and so you'll need to take a step back and broaden your view a bit. Not saying that it can't happen everywhere, but stick to sharing the anecdotes and be more careful applying it to broad situations.
     
  2. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,608
    Likes Received:
    972

    Sep 30, 2018

    Oh, I absolutely care about your perspective. I may not agree with *all* of it, but I enjoy hearing it nonetheless and there were some parts that I find truthful. I just don’t like it when I’m told or it’s insinutaed I’m abusing my power as a teacher, that I’m asking inappropriate questions that invade students’ privacy when determining to extend a deadline, and that I need to check my privilege. That’s what I meant when I said “stop” earlier. Notice I listened before that.

    And when I said “you live in a bubble” I was referencing the fact that certain employees with tenure — I think I said that earlier — have added protections that the “normal” employee would not. For instance, YoungTeacherGuy once stated that firing a tenured teacher took 1-2 years and multiple hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees, plus else. That in of itself is what forms “the bubble” that I mentioned previously.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2018
  3. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2017
    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    272

    Sep 30, 2018

    Well I don't think you get to engage in a conversation with me where you get to decide which topics are allowed and which are not. I believe privilege is a huge piece of this and having lived assessment both ways (with zeros and without zeros) I do believe privilege matters. I stand by the statement that you do not care what I think because to care about another's perspective means being willing to consider the whole perspective, not just the parts that sound okay to you.

    I do think we are using power in an unjustifiable way when we require kids to share their reasons for needing an extension. Many of the kids I worked with have spent their whole life having their privacy violated by strangers who are just "doing their job" so I refuse to be a part of that if it isn't necessary. When talking to kids I do actually distinguish between questions they must answer and questions I would like to ask (but it is up to them if they want to answer).

    I could also cite private sector examples that took just as long and cost just as much as YTG's example. The fact that no one where you work has ever decided to fight back when terminated speaks more to our profession (teaching) than it does to the difference between the public and private sector in my view.
     
  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,608
    Likes Received:
    972

    Sep 30, 2018

    It’s called civil discourse. I have no problem with you speaking your mind freely and I appreciate your contributions to the discussion — truly, but not when it comes to ad hominem attacks. You could have just said that “I don’t agree with that practice,” which is totally fine, and explained your reasons, or “there is a better way to go about doing that,” or a myriad of other different ways.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,472
    Likes Received:
    1,010

    Oct 2, 2018

    I am at a loss to identify ad hominem attacks in what Always_Learning has posted in this thread.
     
  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,608
    Likes Received:
    972

    Oct 2, 2018

    Yes, continue to pretend that you don’t know:

    ad ho·mi·nem
    ˌad ˈhämənəm/
    adverb & adjective
    1. 1.
      (of an argument or reaction) directed against a person rather than the position they are maintaining.
      "vicious ad hominem attacks"
    2. 2.
      relating to or associated with a particular person.

      The posts in question were not about the grading policy solely, but how *I* was violating my students and abusing my power, rather than the inquiry I posited. I asked other posters thoughts on that, not about myself, or my qualities as an educator as reflected by using a policy different than one they use. They were ad hominem, by definition.
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,472
    Likes Received:
    1,010

    Oct 2, 2018

    Not so fast, futuremathsprof. You've made a serious charge; if true, it would be grounds for suspension or even banning from A to Z. But you haven't established the truth of your charge until you share the evidence that you believe makes your case. Since the allegation is lodged in this thread, the requisite proof necessarily consists of actual words posted in this thread by the person against whom the allegation is lodged.

    Let's see direct quotations, with proper context, in support of your charge of ad hominem. Paraphrases will not suffice. Please supply, for each quotation, the number of the post (visible in the last line of each post).
     
    swansong1 likes this.
  8. Hoot Owl

    Hoot Owl Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    3,888
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 9, 2018

    It's the teacher's responsiblity to make sure all the students learn. Some have to be reached differently than others. You don't know what's going on it that child's life. I had a student who slept every day, or tried to, then I found out he had no heat in his home. You can't sleep if you're not warm. Investigate these kids, get to know who they are. Yes, I spent 25 years in the classroom and personally had a "no zero" policy, because I was determined they were going to learn under my watch.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. 712Teacher2B,
  2. futuremathsprof,
  3. Iteachalgebra
Total: 371 (members: 5, guests: 334, robots: 32)
test