Teachers in Oklahoma

Discussion in 'General Education' started by YoungTeacherGuy, Jun 10, 2018.

  1. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jun 12, 2018

    Performance (Merit) Pay. So basically each district sets its own standards getting the pay. In my second year we all met in teams with the principal and set a bunch of goals and if we met at least one of the goals by the end of the year, we got paid. It's funny I remember one of our goals was to reclassify 1/3 of our ELLS so it came down to one in my class passing the Azella (the ELL) test. He did and because of that, we met our goal as a team. I remember I printed him out a certificate and got him a huge candy bar when I got the scores back.
    :)
     
  2. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Off-topic a bit, but these types of goals drives me nuts - where the eval is decided on how well you meet self-created goals: it promotes choosing an easier goal (not that everyone would) to ensure that the data will look good (again, not saying you, just in general)
     
  3. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    When we had to sit down and set our goals we (all new teachers) were so overwhelmed that we just kind of used the goals from the teachers last year. I don't even think we understood teaching or testing well enough so we all just kind of looked at each other and said "OK.''
    A lot of the goals were related to achieving proficient on the ATI Galileo ELA and Math test or getting out of red on DIBELS.

    Needless to say: we didn't meet many of our other goals.
    :(
     
  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

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    Horrible. Absolutely horrible.
     
  5. blazer

    blazer Groupie

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  6. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jun 17, 2018

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  7. blazer

    blazer Groupie

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    Which is sad because I love your country and your compatriots. We were really impressed with Oklahoma City when we visited last year. Weirdly we were told that the City population voluntarily paid a 1c in the $ tax to revitalise the industrial part of the city and when the improvements were finished voted to keep the tax in place.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2018
  8. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

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    Those OK teachers should just move to an adjacent state or to a blue state. They would get massive pay increases, which would more than justify the move. They need to realize that people in OK obviously don’t care about them or their plight and they are continually maltreated by the state officials, so why should they have any allegiance to OK?
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2018 at 1:03 AM
  9. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

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    Jun 17, 2018

    Agreed although I’m sure it’s easier said than done to just move.
     
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  10. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

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    Here’s how I look at it, when a teacher’s salary basically maxes out at $35,000 and if you move one or more states away and get, say, a $30,000 bump (on account of their years of teaching experience) in salary or greater, then the move paid for itself. Just rent until you can find a house if you’re single.
     
  11. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    It's not as simple as "just move" for everyone. Perhaps they have family obligations that keep them in the area, or a spouse with a good job. I moved across the country from my family and have been fine, but I have several friends who I know could never handle doing what I did.

    Not to mention, if you are very experienced and have a Master's, you're going to have a really hard time getting hired elsewhere. In some places, it's hard with even just 5-10 years of experience. Teachers are paid very well relative to the COL in my home city, but there are also literally thousands of people applying for the same job and many places have unofficial policies about not hiring someone with more than 3 years of experience. Other places will only credit you for a few years if you move districts, so a very experienced teacher isn't going to want to start over at the bottom of the salary scale. Not to mention, moving states can really screw up your retirement.

    I'm not too far in CO- if a teacher with my experience level and a MA degree moved to my city, they'd likely get around a $15,000-20,000 raise, but the cost of a small house is 4x more here, so is the raise really worth it? Places they could get hired more easily are probably not that much better, and places that have good situations for teachers are really hard to get hired in.

    It sounds like a lot of people are leaving the state anyway. I wonder what the "breaking point" would have to be for the state to consider it a true problem. It sounds like they already have schools that aren't fully staffed. I would guess that many of those fighting against the tax increases don't have children/have grown children or aren't connected to the schools in any way, so they feel like it's not their problem. My guess is that they will try measures such as making it easier for unqualified people to teach before considering that they might have to raise salaries in order to get people to stay.
     
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  12. Been There

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    Jun 18, 2018 at 3:31 AM

    Your surmise is not too far off the mark, as described here. Failing districts will exploit any group of people just to stay afloat. I must say, many school administrators possess excellent survival skills - this includes traveling halfway around the world to recruit teachers. Now, if only they would apply the same determination to running their schools - wishful thinking.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2018 at 3:49 AM
  13. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Habitué

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    Jun 18, 2018 at 9:38 AM

    I have heard of this and it scares me. I already have my masters and a job for next year but I might want to switch districts in the future. In my area, it seems like districts are looking for teachers with experience but you never know. :(
     
  14. joealee

    joealee Rookie

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    Jun 18, 2018 at 9:47 AM

    Wow, that is a tough salary to live on. I guess it would be ok to get a foot in the door and build a resume as a 22-24 year old who is living at home. Sadly, I doubt there will be many experienced teachers left in the state, and once again the children suffer.
     
  15. joealee

    joealee Rookie

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    Jun 18, 2018 at 9:52 AM

    I agree, but it can be a real pain to move and go through the new state's certification process. It can be time consuming and sometimes very different from your original state cert.
     
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  16. bella84

    bella84 Fanatic

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    Jun 18, 2018 at 6:44 PM

    I agree with everything in waterfall's post. I'm in Missouri, a neighboring state. Even if they came to the "big" cities in our state - or at least the metropolitan areas, they wouldn't be getting a $30,000 raise. Even if they could get credit for all of their years experience, Missouri schools don't pay all that much better, particularly outside of the major metropolitan areas. As waterfall said, it's not common to get more than a few years of experience credited to you anyway when you change districts. The most I've ever heard of is 10 years. So, even if you've been teaching for 20 years, you'll only get salary credit for half that time. Moving to a new state just isn't going to solve all of their problems. And it's likely to cause them more.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2018 at 8:47 PM
  17. bella84

    bella84 Fanatic

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    Jun 18, 2018 at 6:45 PM

    It's not a problem if you change districts early in your career. But, after you've been teaching for a few, it's best to stay put - for salary schedule credit and retirement, especially. Don't worry too much right now. Just don't stay somewhere for a long time if you know that it's not your "forever" school.
     
  18. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Connoisseur

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    Jun 18, 2018 at 8:45 PM

    I know of numerous districts in CA that honor up to 20. That’s sad they don’t honor more than 10, typically. That seems like an insult. Your experience would be honored in the private industry...
     
  19. bella84

    bella84 Fanatic

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    Jun 18, 2018 at 8:50 PM

    Possibly. But, even so, private schools around here don't pay much better than the public schools. Many pay significantly less. On top of that, you don't get the pension if you work for a private school. Our pension system is very stable and fully funded, so it's not something to give up unless you're getting something a lot better in return.

    Two years ago, I had a job offer from a public and a private school about 10-15 minutes apart from one another. Both offered me all of my years experience on the salary schedules - 7 years. The public school offered me a greater salary overall, better retirement, and better benefits. So, I went with the public school.
     
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  20. whizkid

    whizkid Companion

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    Jun 18, 2018 at 8:58 PM

    Those that do decide to come here and leave a private school, this is the biggest reason.
     

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