Teacher sleeping during nap time?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Questions, Nov 4, 2006.

  1. tracieann

    tracieann Rookie

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    Jan 1, 2007

    I used to work at a daycare/preschool setting where several of the teachers (almost regularly) fell asleep in the classroom during nap time. It was disturbing to me, but the other classroom teachers did NOT leave the children otherwise unattended. It's not fair to make the other teachers take the responsibility when that time (not on break) should be spent prepping.

    On the other hand, after a car accident 2 1/2 years ago which has made a full night's rest impossible for me, I totally understand the feeling of needing a nap, especially with my current sweet but VERY demanding class of 3's and 4's. They can be exhausting. (I work 7:30am to 4 pm!) However, I chose this profession and LOVE IT! I need to rise to the needs and my own expectations for my class.

    Someone who sleeps every day and yells at their class is burned out and needs to consider a new job. Preschool and daycare can be exhausting and strenuous but SO important to the children's future and well-being. Someone who yells is not setting a good example and sets a neative tone for the classroom.
     
  2. becky

    becky Enthusiast

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    Jan 1, 2007

    I worked in a cup factory for 13 years, on third shift. If anyone was caught asleep, even on break, they were walked out and their employee badge was confiscated. I only remember one person being given a second chance, and they blew that, too.

    This should be a no brainer where children are concerned.
     
  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 1, 2007

    The thing is, though, that the teacher wasn't caugh asleep. She was caught yawning and stretching. At least that's how I understand the original post.
     
  4. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Jan 1, 2007

    Also, it may have happened only one time. Once when I worked at a day care I fell asleep with the two yrs olds. It only happened once and there was always two of us in the room. I had a sinus infection but didn't know it. The director was the one that finally said she thought I may have a sinus infection. She didn't fire me. She just told me to got to the doctors. The next day I went to the doctors after I woke up and couldn't even lift my head. Now if the person is sleeping every day, that is another story. But if it happened once and she was on break, well give her a break. Now I couldn't even imagine sleeping at school.
    I have had a couple of students fall asleep during DEAR time (my first and second graders).
     
  5. Troods

    Troods Rookie

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    Jan 1, 2007

    As a therapeutic nursery supervisor I applaude your suggestion czacza. The approach is sensitive, nonblaming, and creates good will between a teacher and her peer in situations where a person needs to get some cold water on the face or take a breath of fresh air. In fact, when our classroom teacher is without a co-teacher, my co-supervisor or I will sometimes sit in for a teacher while she/he takes a much needed 5 minutes.

    Of course, if any problem behavior is repetitive, the director or supervisor should know. My co-supervisor and I meet with the teacher, find out what the circumstances are and then do some problem solving. We also raise it as a topic in staff meeting (without mentioning the staff member's name) and everyone can problem solve together. HOWEVER, and I do stress this......my first obligation is to the children. If a staff member is physically or emotionally unable to do the job and keep the children safe, then I have to deal strongly with it. This is not a paper pushing job (I know sometimes it feels like it). If you lose a memo it's rough. If a child is hurt by our personal situations, it is disaster.

    We, by the way, do a lot of staff training to handle the situations which result in teachers' anger being unleashed at the kids. Training and practice are the most important solutions to how we react in the classroom. I definitely prefer it to firing :angel:
     
  6. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Jan 2, 2007

    Well said Troods.
     
  7. Troods

    Troods Rookie

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    Jan 3, 2007

    Thanks so much Jamie Marie. Happy to be here around good, dedicated and smart folks.
     
  8. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Jan 3, 2007

    The thought of an adult who was responsible for the safety and welfare of my children, even THINKING SERIOUSLY about nodding off while on duty, makes my skin crawl. I can't think of any good reason for it, and if someone has a disability that requires a nap, then that person has no business being put in charge of little children.

    You blink off for thirty seconds, and a little child can climb out the window and sit down in the highway. And it would be your fault, entirely.

    This whole topic creeps me out. Why would an adult, in charge of children, feel entitled to nap while on duty?

    On the other hand, a teacher whose break was spent completely out of the sight of children, might understandably doze for a few minutes. Just be sure to set your alarm, and get your yawning and stretching out of your system before anybody sees you.

    A work day is just that: a work day. If you require a nap, get some other job.
     
  9. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    Jan 3, 2007

    Well, I think in MOST jobs....that is grounds for dismissal! I guess in teaching it isn't???
    :rolleyes:
     
  10. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Jan 3, 2007

    Accomodations

     
  11. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Jan 4, 2007

    I agree. Personally, and this is just my opinion, anyone who required a nap every day to function properly is not fully capable to being responsible for the children and would not get hired by me. I consider that an unsafe situation and when you are talking about the teaching profession, it's impossible many times to accomodate something like that. I would not consider it reasonable, IMHO.
     
  12. sdj284

    sdj284 Rookie

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    Jan 4, 2007

    Sometimes this may happen but a teacher shouldn't plan to sleep in the room with the kids and when you are at work you shouldn't be sleeping. I have taken a nap when I get home . Little ones can make you very tired.
     
  13. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    Jan 4, 2007

    some people have suggested that it would frowned upon to go to a director...to tattle, if you will. Personally, I think that it is the directors job to know what is going on at their center. So, I don't feel the need to go and report whatever or whoever. But, I do have to question why anyone would feel, as a director, that someone going and giving the information to the best of their knowledge is wrong. We teach children to use thier words and to confront the problem with the correct people. It is not the op's job to sit down with the employee and discuss whether or not she was sleeping, that is the directors job. So, if she/he had gone into the directors office, stated the facts, not his or her opinion, then what would have been the problem?
     
  14. MissWull

    MissWull Cohort

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    Jan 4, 2007

    There should be absolutely no excuse for sleeping...in any setting, in any job...! You take the job you choose or in some situations you just need it, but regardless it is a no brainer (as was mentioned above)...people should not sleep on the job under any circumstance. We all work long hours, etc. at some point in our lives, but sleep is for home...not work.
     
  15. angilline

    angilline Rookie

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    Jan 4, 2007

    I have been diagnosed recently with Narcolepsy and believe me it is hard and not fun. I did not choose this disability and it did not appear until after I was in my senior year of college. Like many of you, teaching is a calling for me. I would love to make more money doing something else but I would never love anything as much as I do teaching. My narcolepsy is completely manageable with medication and a strict sleep schedule. "Reasonable accommodatations" would be to allow me to take a nap if needed during a time where I am not responsible for students. I find it unbelievable at some of the responses and feeling of being personally attacked.

    It would make my skin crawl even more to know that some people as insensitive as some of those in this forum would be responsible for my children!

    I am not only a GREAT teacher and responsible for first graders all day but I am a mother of two young children (ages 4 and 2). I AM FULLY CAPABLE of being responsible for children and take offense to the above comment as well as a few others.

    Just to clarify the situation further for those who would like to know, I do not sleep in the room with my class. I rarely take naps because I just have too much to do but often need to before going home. SO, if I decide to shut the door and take a nap when they are at lunch or recess then I do not see why that would be a problem.

    I couldn't have said it better myself. Exactly how I thought it sounded as if the other person was trying to stir up trouble.
     

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