Tattle Tales

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Batman15, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. Batman15

    Batman15 Rookie

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    Jan 25, 2013

    My one 4th grade class is full of tattle tales. I mean I know it's good they are telling the teacher, but it really interrupts the flow of the lesson. For example, a kid raises his hand and say's "sarah just told me to shut"....I reply "thank you" and give the student a consequence. Then he says the same thing again....sarah loses her temper...it becomes a mess. Not the first time this has happened in this particular class either. I moved those students away from each other...but then the same thing happened later in the class with two more students. Geez Any suggestions?
     
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  3. a2z

    a2z Aficionado

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    Ummm, why was Sarah having to tell the other child to shut up during the lesson? I suggest you teach Sara to say "stop talking, please" and to raise her had when the person next to her won't shut up. That way Sarah doesn't get in trouble and a mess for having to deal with the constant talker who is instigating the problem and not getting in trouble.
     
  4. Batman15

    Batman15 Rookie

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    that sounds like a good idea cause it is the same kids....I will tell them the right way to do things....wish I could think of these things in the moment....rather than have to call a dean for petty behavior....thanks
     
  5. a2z

    a2z Aficionado

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    I was being a bit sarcastic. What you should do is separate the child that is the talker from others as much as possible. Possibly right in front of you so you can curtail him. Sarah shouldn't be getting in trouble for trying to stop him from talking even though some suggest the method of making other students ignore the talker. I don't like that because a talker can disrupt another student for an entire class.

    However, you do need to teach Sara to tell him to stop talking not shut up. That way, the gabber won't have a reason to tattle.

    Is it really the one kid that is always talking and disturbing because if so, that child is the issue to deal with.
     
  6. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Jan 25, 2013

    This type of thing can gain momentum as you noted. Too often it is an attention getting method versus an actual plea for help. The "thank you" and anything that follows rewards the student. It you think the disruption is serious and demands intervention then intervene. It's a judgment call.

    Some teachers tell students to "write" their complaint on paper which will be checked for proper form and mechanics, turn it in after class and it will be addressed on Friday. Most give up due to having to write or by Friday have forgotten what the complaint was about.
     
  7. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Jan 25, 2013

    I usually just say "we need to use polite words when asking others to quiet down" and then give examples. If it is not a serious matter I tend to say "worry about yourself," or "who should you worry about?"
     
  8. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Jan 26, 2013

    I agree. You may also want to teach your students some problem solving skills --- informing vs. tattling.
     
  9. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Jan 26, 2013

    Tattling: telling on someone to get them in trouble rather than using your words to solve a problem

    Reporting: telling on someone in order to keep them, yourself, someone else, or someone's property safe from physical harm

    Teach them the difference. Use examples. Practice.
     
  10. a2z

    a2z Aficionado

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    Jan 26, 2013

    Let's not forget emotional harm or academic harm. The chatterbox disrupting Sarah's education is a problem. Sarah should be able to tell the teacher it is happening without being labeled a tattle-tale.

    Not all kids will stick up for themselves and no child should feel that they can't be allowed to tell the teacher that another student won't quit bothering them when they are trying to learn.
     
  11. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jan 26, 2013

    I think it's important though to help build functional social skills. Publicly tattling, even if acceptable to teachers, is generally not accepted by peers, and can lead to peer rejection and other social issues.

    First, it needs to be taught that there are some things you attempt to deal with yourself, then if unsuccessful you seek help. There are other things that you don't attempt by yourself.

    Then, social related to defending oneself should be taught, including how to respond to statements such as shut up. If a child tattles about something, then, but should have attempted to deal on his or her own, the teacher should prompt the child to use previously taught skills then come back and let the teacher know how it went.
     
  12. Ms.SLS

    Ms.SLS Cohort

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    Jan 26, 2013

    I teach 7th grade, so it's a little different, but I'll usually say "Well, I didn't see/hear it so I'm not going to take sides, but if X DID happen, please don't do it again or there will be a consequence."

    If a kid is a repeat tattler, I'll more often than not just tell them to worry about their own business.
     
  13. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 26, 2013

    I may have tattled here and there when I was in elementary school. :lol: For me, it was usually because I felt like it wasn't fair that someone else got to break the rules. I was that kid who was super focused on what was fair and what wasn't. I really only tattle every now and then, and never publicly. I would come up to the teacher afterwards and say what I needed to say in private.

    I think a good solution is to ask students to write down their concerns on a slip of paper and drop them into a box or something for later review. If you use this system, it's also important to make sure to teach your students that if it's an issue of safety, it needs to be reported right away--not written down and dropped into the box.
     
  14. a2z

    a2z Aficionado

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    Should interfering with your learning be something that a student should be able to report to a teacher? If so, how when it is in the middle of a lesson? If not, how can a student be held responsible for learning if the student next to him or her is preventing that from happening?
     
  15. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    We need to teach our students to handle certain situations on their own. For example, a student should be taught to say "Please be quiet, Billy" if Billy is talking or being disruptive. If that doesn't solve the problem, then the student can bring it to the attention of the teacher. Even at that point, students should learn how to raise the issue in a tactful and private or semi-private way. Whether you want to call it "reporting inappropriate behaviors that are impacting student learning" or "tattling", if it happens in public in front of the rest of the class, it could definitely result in some problems for the reporter/tattler, like shaming, bullying, ostracizing, etc. If we want to talk about how feelings of being bullied and ostracized impact student learning, we sure can. I would argue that students who feel left out of the group, picked on, or made fun of--for any reason--aren't going to be learning too much.
     
  16. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Phenom

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    Jan 26, 2013

    In some cases I think it would be best to assign a consequence to the student doing the tattling for interrupting the flow of the lesson, and then later informing them to work out their problems quietly amongst themselves at an appropriate time. If there is a burning issue a student needs to tell you regarding another student, ask them to write it on a note and give it to you after class. Students need to learn to deal with this stuff. One thing I am quickly learning this year is to not make students' problems my own problems.
     
  17. a2z

    a2z Aficionado

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    What I'm getting from both responses is, if it is the middle of the lesson, even though the a child through no fault of her own must relinquish her opportunity to learn because getting help when her only appropriate methods fail would be socially unacceptable or would be her problem, not the teachers. Worse yet, the act of trying to stand up for herself would get her in trouble by "talking in class".
     
  18. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Not sure which responses you are referring to, but I would support these following steps:

    1) With certain behaviors/issues, child attempts to solve on his/her own.

    2) If child prematurely asks for help, teacher redirects child to use appropriate conflict resolution skill.

    3) If child reports skill is unsuccessful and makes the decision that the issue is significant and can't be ignored, the child should ask for help with the issue. If appropriate, the child is able to ask to speak privately with the teacher.
     
  19. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jan 26, 2013

    So I'm not sure I read the thread closely enough - I definitely think it's important to allow a student the opportunity to handle the situation directly by speaking with the disruptive student, assuming that's the expected behavior. Expecting the child to wait until the end of the lesson doesn't make much sense.
     
  20. a2z

    a2z Aficionado

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    So, what is the solution if asking the student to stop didn't work, she can't raise her hand during the lesson because that would be tattling or snitching, she can't really privately tell the teacher anything because the teacher is delivering a lesson, she can't get up and move, she can't be obnoxious and say loudly "would you please stop talking" because that would get her in trouble for not properly handing the situation because it might embarrass the other student. Expecting her to wait until the end doesn't make sense, so what are the options?

    Any idea?
     
  21. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jan 26, 2013

    Hey a2z - just responded to the message you had sent - pretty much gave my response. I went back to find the sent message to repost here for the purpose of others following the conversation, but couldn't find my response anywhere. If you have any following thoughts, would you mind copying my response and responding to that so it's visible on the forum? Thanks!
     

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