Talkative Classroom

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by TeachCreateInspire, Oct 2, 2018.

  1. TeachCreateInspire

    TeachCreateInspire Rookie

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    Oct 2, 2018

    I just took a long term sub position, and I am needing help with a chatty classroom. I have tried the teachers advice, tried clipping down like I was told to do, and tried saying "I'm looking for the table that is sitting quietly like I asked" to add some sort of competition for them and NOTHING is working. I get them quiet for a few minutes and they are right back to talking. I gave them a test today and told them they CANNOT talk during it because I would assume they are cheating and explained the consequences of cheating on a test and they didn't care. Does anyone know of any tricks that really worked for them? I would like to nip this in the bud while I am still new.
     
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  3. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Oct 2, 2018

    Sounds like you need to build more rapport with the students and develop a stronger classroom culture first. Extrinsic rewards/punishments will just be a bandaid for a bigger problem that needs stitches.
     
  4. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Oct 2, 2018

    Did you follow through on this when they continued talking?

    Some classes are tough. I had a group last year that was exactly like this. Clear and consistent expectations are very important with groups like this. They'll tend to do exactly what they can get away with, so you have to set the bar very clearly for what you will allow. Easier said than done, and I'm not trying to criticize your skills because it's hard for most of us at one time or another. Different groups need different strategies.

    To put it another way...

    Do your students throw chairs or books in your classroom?

    If no - why not? It's a very clear expectation. We do not throw chairs or books in the classroom. It's so clear, they can't argue it. They absolutely know it's not okay and they'll be held responsible if they do so.

    Can you say the same for talking when they are not supposed to? What very clear consequence will happen every single time they are talking when it's not okay to do so?
     
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  5. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Oct 2, 2018

    One of my classes is the same way but I was able to get them quiet when they need to be (tests and exit tickets.) For tests, it really helped to have privacy folders (I just cut up trifolds from the dollar tree) and to stand near kids who are talking.
     
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  6. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Yes - privacy folders can be very helpful too.
     
  7. showmelady

    showmelady Companion

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    Oct 7, 2018

    If your class is higher than about third grade I doubt if you will EVER be able to get the students to stop the constant talking! I think this is because we have lost the idea that the students NEED to be quiet and pay attention, and of course they just chatter. This chatter goes right alone with the idea that they can get out of their seats at will, that they can lay on the floor, or sit under tables or (if allowed) go out in the HALL and sit, or that they don't have to actually sit at all, that they can stand, or sit on exercise balls, or whatever they want to do! The idea that the TEACHER is in charge went out the window long ago!

    Time outs and clip down does not seem to be doing the trick very well. Frankly, many students do not give a rip if their clip is up or down or even visible. And times outs mainly give them that extra few minutes to plan their next way to just ignore any RULES they should be following!

    I am sure all schools do not have this problem. At least, I fervently hope that is true.
     
  8. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Oct 7, 2018

    I teach above third and my expectations are that students are silent when I'm speaking and that they do not leave their seats without permission.

    They need reminders on both but for the most part they're able to meet these expectations.

    There are always one or two students each year, though, who seem wholly unaccustomed to doing what an adult says. Most of my students know they can't tell a teacher "no". The ones who don't understand that... It takes a lot of work, especially because it usually means they're allowed to tell adults "no" at home with no consequence.
     

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