Switching to Title 1

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by teachingtalk, Apr 25, 2019.

  1. teachingtalk

    teachingtalk New Member

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    Apr 25, 2019

    I’m new here, but I need some advice.
    I’m finishing up my first year teaching and my administration recently told me that they are not renewing my contract. I had a class with a lot of behaviors and I didn’t get a lot of support until March. I had consistently asked for more support, too. I was shocked to hear they were not bringing me back because there was no talk of it, and no warnings. I don’t disagree with their reasonings, but I really thought I had grown a lot this year and my kids had shown more growth than I expected due to my constant need to handle behaviors and not teach.

    My principal told me she would like to apply for one of the title positions open at the school. I’m hesitant due to the lack of support I had in the classroom, and how big of a failure I feel like I am. I’m also nervous of people looking down on me for having to “move down” to title, which obviously isn’t the case. My question Is, what would you do in my position? And how would you feel about this? Has anyone experienced this?
     
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  3. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Apr 25, 2019

    I work in a Title I district, so we have no idea who is paid with Title I funds and who isn’t. Back when we were a Title I school, those positions weren’t viewed any differently than the other positions. Title I setups can look different in different places, but for us it was just a regular teacher in a regular classroom.
     
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  4. TheGr8Catsby

    TheGr8Catsby Rookie

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    Apr 27, 2019

    I LOVED being in Title. I did small group interventions (and I secretly had additional time and didn't have to hold my pee for hours at a time). I don't think that people will think that it is a step down, since you were in a classroom in the same building this year. I do think that some people thought I was an aide my first year in Title because I moved buildings to do it.
     
  5. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Apr 27, 2019

    Our Title I coordinator is my biggest teaching partner and, in my opinion, second only to the principal when it comes to the success of our school. My biggest, most important suggestion I can make (as a former Title I teacher who didn't have strong support), is to learn all about Response to Intervention (RTI). This is all about finding ways to listen to the language of the learner and to answer it. http://rtinetwork.org/learn is a treasure trove of information that my coordinator uses and I have come to love.
     
  6. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    May 30, 2019

    What do you mean by Title positions? As in an intervention teacher?

    IMO, those positions are golden and I try not to be envious. I'd SO love to do paperwork and pull small groups and if Johnny is being a little troll, tell the classroom teacher and it's out of my hands.b No grades, no parents, no grading, did I mention no grading? In my experience, when students don't show progress, the breathing is down the classroom teacher's neck. No one gives the Title or intervention teacher hell or bad vibes.

    They're doing the best they can. Classroom teachers the best isn't enough, you need to stay after school or before school to tutor them more. I don't think I've ever seen an intervention teacher be made to tutor.
     
  7. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    May 30, 2019

    Our intervention teachers (we're no longer allowed to say "title 1 teacher" for some reason :rolleyes:) run the school. If anything it would be considered a step up in my district. However, it is otherwise pretty common for non-classroom positions to be seen as "less than," IME.

    As I see this was posted a month ago, I assume OP has already decided. If not, I would go for it and see if you like it. If you don't, you can always move on the next year hopefully without a non-renewal on your record (it seems it's not really non-renewing if you continue to work in a teaching position at the school). I would LOVE to be an intervention teacher. I actually looked for a couple of years, but the problem is everyone else has the same idea. The positions get filled internally by people who want out of the classroom and are never even posted.
     
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  8. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Jun 1, 2019

    I would LOVE to teach intervention!
     
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  9. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Jun 6, 2019

    I'd kill a man with my bare teeth to get one of the Title I jobs in my building.
     
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  10. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Jun 6, 2019

    I had no idea what a Title 1 teacher was so the term intervention teacher makes more sense. It seems like the OP is thought highly of if she is asked to move into this position but that's just my :2cents:.
     
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  11. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jun 6, 2019

    I know “title one” positions are often coveted here, but title one just means that’s where the funding comes from. In two of my schools, title one positions were nothing more than hourly teaching assistant/tutoring jobs. They basically did the work of an interventionist but got paid much, much less. While I’d love the job itself, I could never afford to take the pay.

    The actual coveted jobs in my schools have been referred to as “specialist” positions, as in reading specialist and math specialist. They may or may not be paid for with title one money. No one knows.
     
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  12. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jun 6, 2019

    My issue with the Title 1 position is that they are funded by Title 1 which means that not every school even has them, even if they need them, and what happens if the funding gets cut? In AZ in my district, we had Title 1 assistants in SOME schools, but not all. And like you said, they weren't even certified teachers doing the exact job you outlined ^. Not every school even had that! From what I understand, the schools get the $ and can kind of decide what to do with it.
    But then some schools DO actually have Title 1 reading teachers or interventionists who are actually certified teachers. I remember interviewing for a position before I had my cert and they could NOT hire me without it because the funding stipulates that the teacher had to be certified. He was like "is there any way you can get it by August?" I had just started my program at that point.
    So even the position itself is interpreted differently depending on the school. But more or less, from my understanding, it DOES refer to assisting students who struggle in some shape or form.
    Back home, they are simply referred to as a math or reading (interventions) teacher, as opposed to specialist. But we also had Title 1 instructional coaches, which... based on my interactions with mine, I had no clue what they were paid to do. Because it didn't seem like they did much.
     
  13. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jun 6, 2019

    Hunger Games style?
    ;)
     
  14. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Which is sad. :( I consider it more "support on the side'' and a lot of the students REALLY need it! They don't get the attention or instruction that they need in the classroom while the teacher is attempting to deal with everyone's needs so the interventionists come in and really fill the gaps. I don't think a lot of people really understand the positions or the work that goes with them. All of the assessment, paperwork, etc.
     
  15. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    RIGHT? And it's frustrating as it makes it difficult (near impossible) for newbies trying to get in. You can get the TEACH grant to study it, as it's considered a "shortage area,'' and yet... the positions DO get filled by internal classroom teachers. :mad: I suppose the only real way to get the job IS to get a classroom position, put in your time, and transfer if needed / wanted.
     
  16. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jun 6, 2019

    I think you are correct that Title I is simply a source of funding, and there are stipulations both for how districts qualify to receive the funding and for how they can use it. There are many ways that it can be used, and each school will choose to do what is best for them. So, it's difficult for all of us in different districts across the country to compare Title I positions. They're not going to be the same.

    My district definitely receives Title I funding, but we're all clueless as to how the funds are used. No one has a job title of "Title I Teacher".
     
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  17. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jun 6, 2019

    Even within the same state or district can interpret "Title 1'' positions in different ways. Our instructional coaches were Title 1 positions (to "help teachers'') and they were basically useless. The only good thing about my first coach was she ran the Title 1 room which basically was like a Lakeshore for teachers on campus. It had all kinds of games and activities to supplement ELA and math instruction. It was like being in a candy store. :D
    But I found out recently that they CUT her position and she had to go back into the classroom. I don't think it's very stable to be honest. That's probably one of the main differences: the stability.
     
  18. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    The title I funds don't even have to be used specifically for "positions". They can be used specifically to fund another teacher, coach, TA, or interventionist, but they don't have to be used specifically in that way. They can be used for additional resources or to partially fund salaries of positions that would exist either way.
     
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  19. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Very true. A lot use it for technology or to update curriculum.
    https://www.studentdebtrelief.us/student-loans/title-1-schools/
    I'd personally rather have more staff/ specialists, than technology. I worked in a school that used the money for tech, which was nice, but we had large class sizes and NO instructional interventionists/ supports, so we had to do everything ourselves. That's kind of what led me back to school.
     
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  20. DLolly

    DLolly New Member

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    Jun 28, 2019

    Because you didn't get any support, you might look for openings at a different campus.
     
  21. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Have your association make a public records request. We have done this several times and it is rather enlightening.
     

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