Students who throw up in class

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by teacheratheart, Oct 18, 2006.

  1. teacheratheart

    teacheratheart Companion

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    Oct 18, 2006

    So, our nurse and our janitor at our school aren't helpful. On more than one occasion I've had a student throw up in my class. If I send them to the nurse, she sends them back without calling home and everytime they throw up again. And the janitor doesn't like to do ANYTHING!! So, he gave me a bag of stuff to put on the throw up. He won't even come in and do it himself. I have to do it. And then it sits there all day long! It smells bad and I think it's disgusting. But because the stuff kills the bacteria, he thinks it's okay to leave it there. So, this happened again today in the morning. And while the kids were in lunch I was sitting in the teachers lounge (I don't normally eat in there) because I didn't want to be in my classroom with the throw up and I started crying because I was so mad. My principal saw me and took me into her office and we talked. The janitor would not come clean it up, so they called in the night janitor (who's a doll and I wish she worked all the time) and she came in 3 hours early just so she could clean the throw up off my floor.

    But the point is, I don't care if it kills the bacteria. I still don't think it's sanitary to have it laying on the floor all day. This has to be some kind of health code violation, doesn't it? And what about the nurse? How hard is it to call the parents and say,"hey, your kid threw up in class. Come get them."
     
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  3. Rosieo

    Rosieo Enthusiast

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    That is awful!!!! It should be cleaned up right away and your principal should make sure it is. Besides being gross sitting there what if someone slipped on the mess and got hurt. Why does the janitor feel it is not his job to clean it up. That's disgusting!
     
  4. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    It isn't a conductive learning environment. It's a distraction if nothing else.
     
  5. ABall

    ABall Fanatic

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    Oct 18, 2006

    did your principal adress that? I would think that the nurse should and the janitor should do thier jobs.
     
  6. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    That is disgusting!
    I know that the stuff they put on it kills the bacteria and absorbs the moisture so a lot of times they let it sit for a little bit before cleaning it up, but there's no reason why it should be on your floor all day long!
     
  7. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Depending on what grade you are in and if you classes rotate or not, but I would think this would be a little humiliating to the student who has to be reminded (along with classmates who remind the person) all day about their embarassing mishap.
     
  8. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Oct 18, 2006

    Vomit is an automatic ticket home in our school. The kid goes to the nurse and is not to be returned to school until 24 hours after the last episode of vomiting. (so, if a child throws up at 10 AM, he/she is not allowed at school the next day until at least 10:01. We've had parents sit in their cars, knowing that they can't bring them at 9:55...which strikes me as hilarious. We wouldn't be THAT precise on the timing!)

    As for your janitor, what's his problem? He took a job as a janitor in a school. There is a certain amount of yuck factor involved in that. Vomit, blood, feces, urine...it's part of the job. Your principal shouldn't allow him to not do his job. That's just wrong.
    Kim
     
  9. PurpleTweety

    PurpleTweety Companion

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    At our school, every classroom teacher has a plastic basin that is solely for kids who feel ill. It still has to be cleaned up of course, and the basin disinfected, but at least it is not all over the floor or someone's desk. Maybe investing in a basin for your own classroom would be a good idea.
     
  10. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Ours are not sent home unless they have a temperature of 101. I have had the school nurse send students back to my classroom after throwing up because they do not have a temperature of at least 101.

    I have even had students return to my class with diareah (sp?). Parents are phoned but a lot of them choose not to pick up their child. I have even had a parent drop off clean clothes and leave an extra set for their child, so they can leave their child at school :eek: .
     
  11. djmondi

    djmondi Comrade

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    Oct 18, 2006

    We have a nurse a few hours a week so it's basically up to the teacher and the parent(s) if the child goes home or not. If a child throws up in my room - I call home and ask them to come get the child. Last year there was no AM custodian so I had to clean it. This year, either my assistant does it or we hunt down one of the janitors.
     
  12. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    If this is the way your school is run, I shudder to think how other issues, especially more serious ones would be handled. They can't even do the right procedures when kids are sick & there will be sick kids daily.
     
  13. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I want someone to tell me the clean up procedure (whether it is me or other staff so it can get cleaned up). Whether someone goes home for throw up or diarehha would greatly depend on why they did it. If it looked like the stomach bug and not some other reason or a medical history, then yes, I would send them home. I know a student who has IBS so diareha wouldn't faze me. It's not been said to me, but I've seen the child struggle. There is a prior history that I have obvserved but ONLY because I was paying attention. Geez. I've also known kids to throw up for sensitivity, car sick (on field trip), etc. The nurse should always check them out and find the cause though. I just wouldn't assume that becuase they didn't get sent home, they were being negligent with their sickness and forcing them to stay in school (but I WILL admit this is the case too often too).
     
  14. teacheratheart

    teacheratheart Companion

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    Well, I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks this is wrong. I talked to my principal a little about it, but I don't think she realizes this is not the first time it's happened. At least it got cleaned up before parents started coming in for conferences today though.
     
  15. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    In the parent handbook there should be a sick policy? Check the policy then go to the school nurse and politely inquire as to why the child was not sent home if this violates the policy. If she has no good answer and continues to ignore policy then talk with the principal. If there is nothing written in the policy about vomitting then suggest the addition at a staff meeting. Explain to the principal that you cannot have the distraction in your class, and (if you don't mind) suggest he takes your class while you take care of the mess.

    On a side note, I've had the experience of lots of children vomitting in my class;just recently, however, I had the priveledge of a child vomitting on me :} Wow, was I ever taken by surprise.
     
  16. lteach2

    lteach2 Cohort

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    Oct 19, 2006


    Unfortunatly, a lot of the smaller kids wouldn't make it that far. Many don't say anything until it's too late.
     
  17. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    That is absolutely disgusting! Our janitor doesn't do much either but he will clean up messes like that. He doesn't like it, and will express his thoughts but he still does it. (I often wonder why he took the job if he doesn't like the puke, pee, and p**p he has to clean up all day.) Anyway, it isn't your job to have to do it, it's his.

    I had a child one time who almost everyday (in first grade) would tell me how sick she was or didn't feel well. Then, when we looped to second grade, she started the whole trend over again. I would tell her she was fine and to go sit down. Well...one day, she told me a couple of times and finally, she went to sit down and puked all over the boy sitting next to her. She was serious that time. I felt horrible but her mom agreed with me...she was like the little boy (girl) who cried wolf. We never knew if she really was sick, except this time.
     
  18. totallybusy

    totallybusy Rookie

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    This is nuts! You are not a nurse or cleaning lady. You are there to teach. In our school if a student throws up we get that child to the washroom immediately for clean up, all students are moved to a vacant room until the janitor cleans the mess. The parents are contacted and the child waits in the office or nurses room until parents pick them up. Chances are this is contagious!
     
  19. Mrs_Goatess

    Mrs_Goatess Comrade

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    Oct 19, 2006

    That's totally out of line! I've had a head janitor rush out of the lunchroom (with is a biohazard itself sometimes!) to clean up two drops of blood in an empty classroom. A student had a bloody nose right during passing before the planning period. I mentioned it to the assistant principal as I passed through the lunchroom and it was cleaned and disinfected in less than five mintues. If there is *anything* a school should be worried about, it's loose body fluids! Document, document, document, and then take it a step above until someone listens!
     
  20. Tbelle1035

    Tbelle1035 Cohort

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    Yuck, your principal should know that this is not a one time thing, that the janitor never cleans it up. Leaving it on the floor like that is definately a health issue. I bet if parents knew what was going on and complained to the principal (or superintendent, school board, etc) that janitor would clean up his act (no pun intended)! I totally agree with DeafinlySmart that no student needs that kind of humiliation. Also, I think you could file a grievance with your union that you are being expected to either perform the janitor's job or tolerate conditions that are unhealthy and intolerable! No one in my district would ever put up with that!
     
  21. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 19, 2006

    Oh no.....in my school they will come clean it up with some absorbing powder and then clean the area where it fell with disinfectant....Once they throw up they go home and STAY THERE until they have been 'vomit-free and fever-free' for 24 hours...
     

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