Student Teaching: Different Teaching Styles

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. LouiseB

    LouiseB Cohort

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    Nov 29, 2017

    I'm going to say that if my student teacher wanted to do something totally against what I believed, they would be on their own. I would not help with any behavior issues because the student teacher set it up. There would not be two teachers working in the room. I probably would stay in the room but just be an observer. When you have your own classroom, you will not have extra help.

    Also it appears that the classroom teacher would have the students again for 6 weeks after you are gone and then would have to bring everything back to the way the classroom teacher had it before. I think your college is way off base in requiring things different. If the college wants that, then they need to find teachers only gearing towards their philosophy or have their own school.

    I was asked if I would have a student teacher and I said yes. I have not received much about what the college is asking for. The college was encouraging cooperative teachers to sign up as collaborative teachers which would have required me to attend several classes on my own time without pay to learn how the college wanted to do it. As stated before, I get nothing out of it and I don't know about my school, but I'm not giving up my personal time. May be selfish but I don't feel that I need to do that. Maybe next time, find someone else.
     
  2. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    Nov 29, 2017

    I think that this is part of what she was thinking about too. Because I only come in once a week this semester, I think she didn't want to put me in a situation where I had to struggle with management. I think I will see how it goes. I feel like not doing some of what my college recommends would be bad for my observations because the rubric is generally focused on the ideas we have learned in school...and I feel like I can't have the first time my students work in groups, focus on conceptual understanding, etc. be for my observation. I also might be overthinking this but I will do my best for the situation that I'm in.
     
  3. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Nov 29, 2017

    Teaching colleges, whether part of a larger university or standing alone, NEED you to be a student. They NEED you to pay tuition and support the instructors/professors in the department. With the sharp decline in education students, there is no way that your license is going to be endangered if you follow the lead of your mentor teacher.
     
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  4. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    Nov 30, 2017

    I agree that my college is expecting our mentor teachers change too much and that it is not fair. I think it will end up as a balancing act (ex. partner work instead of groups, small chunks of group work combined with whole class instruction, a scaffolded high cognitive demand task, some days with direct instruction/differentiated groups like we do now). I did present it to her as what my college supervisor told me. My mentor specifically told me that she thinks groups work better with more teachers and she said she wants to give students the opportunity to talk with each other but there are challenges we need to address. I know that she also would not just observe when other students need help. When I teach lessons, she sits with a table that needs the support on their work. I know that I will not have extra help in my own classroom but we have so many kids that need extra support. So if it supports the students, she is the type who will help out. I have heard of mentor teachers who leave the room while the student teacher is teaching but from what I have gathered, she doesn't seem like she would do that. (I kind of wish she was the type sometimes so I could have that experience though!)
     
  5. Been There

    Been There Companion

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    Nov 30, 2017

    Being that you are somewhat caught in the middle, I think a meeting with the three of you would be in order. This way, your mentor and college supervisor can discuss your sticky situation and hopefully reach a mutual agreement on how to proceed. Don't be afraid to actively faciliate the meeting and mediate if necessary to ensure that all goes well (i.e. everyone acts appropriately). For all the reasons already stated in this thread, it wouldn't be fair to you and your mentor if your supervisor would be unwilling to compromise.

    I believe every student teacher needs to experience teaching the class without any other adults present -I still remember the exhilarating feeling of my first "solo flight" over thirty years ago. Be assertive and tell (don't ask) your mentor that you would appreciate the opportunity to experience teaching alone several times in her classroom. Tell her that this is a critical time to test your wings while she is still available to discuss your concerns and questions about teaching her students - it's part of the learning process for student teachers.
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Nov 30, 2017

    I sense having this opportunity may vary from area to area. Here, our student teachers are not allowed to be alone with students.
     
  7. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    Dec 3, 2017

    Thank you everyone for the advice! I understand better that it is my mentor teacher's classroom and I will be following her directions even if I don't agree with everything. I planned a lesson for this week and she is open to me planning the lesson and giving me feedback even though I haven't started my student teaching yet. I think she will be great to work with next semester! I realize that I can't turn the class into exactly what we have learned about in our classes, but she seems very open to some of the ideas and supporting me in implementing them.I am also learning a lot from her which is great!
     
  8. LouiseB

    LouiseB Cohort

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    Dec 3, 2017

    I'm glad that you have been reflecting on what is to come in your teaching career. This shows that you are adaptive and open to what is coming along. You never know what administers will want from you! These are attributes that a teacher needs I believe. It sounds like you will have a great student teaching experience and that's all that can be hoped for! Good luck!!
     
  9. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    This is a really interesting topic. I think you and your mentor teacher need to come to this understanding: when it comes to getting your credentials, you need to do it the way the school suggests. There needs to be a compromise, you help her, she helps you. If I were the mentor teacher, I would allow you to train them in your methods, and execute those methods ONLY to the extent of your evaluative performances. The rest of the time, however, needs to be in the manner that she insists. These are HER students, their scores reflect HER (even if you teach 50% of the year, the scores 100% reflect on her). A quick anecdote: a math teacher on my hall had a student teacher who employed the methods of the new "math shift" in teaching approaches. The scores sucked, the classroom teacher took the heat for it because it is ultimately her responsibility, even though 50% of the time she didn't teach the lessons and was expected to be OUT OF THE ROOM entirely.
     
  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Comrade

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    Dec 4, 2017

    I'm starting to feel frustrated by the lack of direction that my program is providing. My supervisor said that an ideal classroom has no independent work and students are working in groups all the time. She said the only time for independent work is during homework, which is when they can practice more procedural skills. I asked why students can't practice procedural skills in class as well (independently) because...and she said students should be working in groups all the time. I just don't see the use of having students practice procedures (that they conceptually understand) in partners or groups ALL the time...because I think there is a place for independent work and differentiated worksheets. I feel like I want to strive for a balance in my classroom and do some procedural skills, some high cognitive demand tasks, some discussions, some group work, some parter work, some independent practice, etc. and I feel like I'm only being told one way to run a classroom.
     
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  11. Been There

    Been There Companion

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    Dec 4, 2017

    I can see that you have a clear understanding of what constitutes good teaching. The disconnect you're experiencing with your supervisor is due to her irrational insistence that "students are working in groups all the time". Any approach that is used exclusively will inevitably lose its educational value - this applies to groups too. BTW, wouldn't it be important to know what grade we're talking about or would this generic discussion pertain equally to K-12?
     
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  12. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Comrade

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    Dec 4, 2017

    You have the right idea. Your supervisor sounds like an egg-head, and I'm not so sure why you are having so much interaction with her prior to student teaching. It seems to be making things unnecessarily stressful. I never met my supervisor until after my first week of student teaching was over. Anyway, I'm not sure she is one worth taking advice from in your case, but at least you know to roll out the old dog and pony show for her.
     
  13. Kyle Spearin

    Kyle Spearin Rookie

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    Dec 5, 2017

    I was in a similar situation when I student taught. It's a tough situation because you need to meet your school's expectations, but you also don't want to bump heads with your mentor teacher. If I were you, I would try to see if they will allow you to incorporate 1 element per lesson and go from there. I think that any teacher would find it reasonable to do a 5 minute activity in groups before transitioning to pairs for instance. If this doesn't work, I would have another discussion with the teacher and remind them that they signed up to have you on board and part of that is allowing you to find your own teaching style. At that point, if they still refuse to let you develop your own teaching style, tell someone at your school.
     

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