Student discipline

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by vaticxs, May 10, 2018.

  1. vaticxs

    vaticxs Rookie

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    May 10, 2018

    What kind of discipline do you impose to students with disability especially to the most low functioning kids? I have a para who imposes discipline to my moderate student by letting her work too much. Sometimes the kid is not in the mood to finish a task but the para wants her to finish such as completing the letters of the alphabet to the point that the kid is refusing to work and showing signs of misbehavior and even acting out. If she doesn't finish her tasks, she cannot have her tablet reward or any reward for that matter. Is this a right move to do?
     
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  3. Obadiah

    Obadiah Devotee

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    May 13, 2018

    "Discipline", according to the dictionary can have more than one meaning. It could refer to punishment or it could refer to teaching. Research indicates that consistent classroom procedures are the most advantageous tool for assisting students in following and obtaining expected decorum. Rewards can add a bit of fun to the classroom, but they can also backfire; some research seems to indicate that students might fixate on the reward and deemphasize or despise the process to obtain the reward. Consistent and fair penalties are a common standard all throughout life and have a place within classroom rules, but they can evolve into a system of overpowering, where the students are forced to behave because the teacher is bigger, yells louder, and is stronger--I wonder if that is an appropriate lesson to teach youngsters, especially in modern society; (for example, in my quaint rural town that I grew up in, we're fearful to walk down what used to be the main shopping district for fear of criminal attack). In the example you gave, I would not recommend using classwork as a penalty; classwork is for enrichment, not detainment. Although I would advise consistent application to classroom procedures, I would advise discussing such situations with the student, listening and advising but not preaching and lecturing, and coming up with a possible solution or goal for the student to work at, then following up with the student to see how s/he is meeting the goal.

    I once had a student who didn't get his work done until he got around to it. So I gave him a wooden disk with the word "tuit" on it, (a round tuit). We also discussed goals for completing his work on time, and he never had another problem after that. Not all situations are solved that quickly, but that's an example of how I would suggest approaching situations.
     
  4. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    May 13, 2018

    As Obadiah said, consistent classroom procedures are the best. I like "First/Then" cards and statements. "First, letters, Then, tablet". Keep it consistent and not just a power struggle between para and student. All students, no matter what their ability level, get moments/times where they don't want to work. I will ask, is the work level/load appropriate for this student and assigned/created by you the teacher? (Sometimes paras might pick something above/below a student's ability, is why I ask.)

    Letting her stop work completely and giving her the tablet could reinforce the negative behaviors. Instead, maybe, at signs of agitation, maybe go for a walk, let the student get a drink, etc. That might give them the chance to get up, stretch, break their focus of their frustration, so they can return to the task, finish it, and earn the "Then" part of the If/Then.

    Good luck! :)
     
  5. Been There

    Been There Cohort

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    May 13, 2018

    With all due respect to paras (I used to be one), your biggest challenge may be to convince your classroom aide to do things differently. With few exceptions, the instructional aides I worked with were not very receptive to suggestions, advice or directives from the teacher. Of course, you may have better luck than I.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2018
  6. vaticxs

    vaticxs Rookie

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    May 15, 2018

    I only have 3 students in my class with 2 paras. We work one on one with a kid. One of my paras was a former preschool para and had her own preschool before. She tries to enforce discipline like that of a preschool kid and she sticks to that. She wants to discipline the kid like the way she disciplines her preschoolers. She wants her way even if we tell her that sometimes it doesn't have to be her way because these kids have special needs. Been There-you're right. Some of the paras are not very receptive to suggestions, advice or directives from the teacher.
     
  7. vaticxs

    vaticxs Rookie

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    May 15, 2018

    Thanks Zelda, Been There and Obadiah for your suggestions. They are helpful and will try them next school year. Very much appreciated!
     
  8. JerrySnow

    JerrySnow New Member

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    May 18, 2018 at 8:50 AM

    I disagree. Great work, child psychology buy research paper. I think our children are very important and it is our future. We can't be badly educated in relation to them.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2018 at 3:12 AM

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