Stuck on a word?

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by TulipsGirl, Aug 5, 2007.

  1. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Aug 5, 2007

    I'd like to come up with a list of (5?) ideas/strategies that kids can use when they don't know a word while they are reading. I'm thinking of making a poster or bookmarks so they will have these strategies handy. I would like to practice the strategies with them, but I hope that they will be able to use them independantly, eventually.
    What do you think of the following? And are there others you can recommend? Do you think they should try them in a specific order?

    *Look at the pictures for clues
    * Get your mouth ready for the first sound.
    * Skip the word and read until the end of the sentence. what would make sense there? Read the sentence again.

    :reading: Your thoughts?
     
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  3. teach1st

    teach1st Comrade

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    Aug 5, 2007

    I use a five finger handprint. I make handprints and on each of the fingers there is a strategy. I also have seen this done with a star. At the beginning of the year we use pictures to remind them of the strategy (example: get your mouth ready for the first sound, put a picture of a mouth) I also use find small chunks in the word. I will try and find an example and post it.
     
  4. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Aug 5, 2007

    If you find an example to post, that would be great. Thank you!
     
  5. eduk8r

    eduk8r Enthusiast

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    Aug 5, 2007

    Phonics Decoding Strategies:

    When you come to a word
    you don’t know –

    1. Look carefully at the word.
    2. Look for word parts you know and think
    about the sounds for the letters.
    • First, look for word parts that include
    prefixes and suffixes, and base words,
    • Then, divide the base word into syllables,
    • Sound out and blend the syllables to say the
    base word.
    3. Blend the sounds to read the word.
    4. Ask yourself: Is it a word I know?
    Does it make sense in what I am reading?
    5. If not, ask yourself: What else can I try?

    These strategies are from the Houghton-Mifflin TE. I have a poster of it on the wall and also I made little 4x6 copies, copied them on colored paper, laminated them & put them on every student's desk. Hope that helps.
     
  6. Youngteacher226

    Youngteacher226 Enthusiast

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    Aug 5, 2007

    What about:
    *Find a little word inside a big word
    *Say the beginning sound
    *Say the ending sound
    *Chunk the word into parts
    *Does it look like a word I know?
    *Look through the whole word
     
  7. summersun61

    summersun61 Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2007

    I found this cute poem on canteach.ca

    Reading Strategies Song

    (to the tune of "I'm a Little Tea Pot)

    Look at the pictures, still no clue?
    Read it again all the way through.
    When you get to the place where you are stuck,
    Get your mouth ready and the word pops up!

    (AND NOW... let's check it)

    Think about the word you're trying to say.
    Does it make good sense? Does it sound okay?
    Do all the letters look right to you?
    These are the things good readers do!

    (STILL CAN'T GET IT?)

    Read it again all the way through.
    When you come to the tricky part, don't get blue.
    Get your mouth ready but go on by.
    Read to the end then give it a try.

    (AND NOW...let's check it again)

    Think about the word you're trying to say
    Does it make good sense? Does it sound okay?
    Do all the letters look right to you?
    These are the things good readers do!
     
  8. shartran

    shartran Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2007

    Here's my Reading Strategy Bookmark

    Hi: I have been an Early Lit. Teacher for several years, and our team uses bookmarks/posters for the kids to use. If you are interested in seeing the actual bookmark, email me: shartran@hotmail.com
    However, here is the strategies on the bookmark - less the graphics
    1. Does it make sense?

    2. Look at the vowels…

    A E I O U (remember the 'magic e' rule!)


    3. Does it sound right?


    4. Do you know a little word/pattern inside?


    5. Look at the pictures.
    6. Does it pop into your head?


    7. Go back and try it again.
    8. Skip it… Try it again later.
     
  9. summersun61

    summersun61 Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2007

    That is a good idea to put it on a bookmark.
     
  10. Lilu0819

    Lilu0819 Companion

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    Aug 6, 2007

    We use something similar to this:

    [​IMG]

    I don't think those are the exact phrases on ours. I'll look around and see if I have a copy of one of ours here at home. :)
     
  11. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Aug 15, 2007

    Thank you!!

    Thank you all for your fantastic ideas, and suggestions, they are all so very helpful!:2up:

    If any of you are looking for additional ideas, another thread suggested this sight, too. Very cute :)

    http://aschilb.emsd37.org/reading/ReadingSTR.htm

    They have bothe decoding and comprehension strategies using beanie babies.
     
  12. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Aug 17, 2007

    Another good one is "make up a word and see if it fits,"
    This is useful in those darn standardized tests. There are so many names used in the tests that my kids aren't familiar with. So we talk a lot about capital letters starting a name, and in reading, if they don't know the name, just make up a name and keep reading.

    I love all the other ideas and I am also using the big hand in my classroom this year. I will make a small one for their desks, and will send one home to the parents also. I just cringe and crack up all at the same time when a parent tells me, "He is just guessing the word by looking at the picture, so I cover up the picture and make him sound out the word." "Yes, those books are written with clues in the picture, so it is ok for him to get clues from the picture."
     
  13. TulipsGirl

    TulipsGirl Cohort

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    Aug 18, 2007


    I know! no wonder our kids think it's "cheating" to look at the picture! I can't say that I blame parents, they just want to make sure that their kids are really learning to read.

    I have to explain to kids and parents that the author and illustrator knows that they are writing for 6 year olds. The pictures are meant to be used - for decoding clues and comprehension cues!! Its so normal, and I even encourage it :) parents are so relieved to hear that...
    When a parent still hesitates in agreeing that its ok, I even tell them "come on... you mean when you read college textbooks, or even the newspaper... you don't use the charts and pictures to help you understand?" Bingo.
     

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