Strategies for high class sizes

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by ahodge79, May 16, 2014.

  1. ahodge79

    ahodge79 Companion

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    May 16, 2014

    what tips do you have for working in primary classrooms with 30+ kids?

    Thank you!
     
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  3. ktdclark

    ktdclark Comrade

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    May 16, 2014

    structure and consistency, routine and flexibility:)
     
  4. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 17, 2014

    You have to have solid classroom management. It will get out of control quickly if you don't.
     
  5. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    May 17, 2014

    create a seating chart with a couple of extra desks so you have open spots to move children as needed.

    Start out extra firm, especially in the parents' eyes.

    Find an easy (for you) way to communicate with all of the parents at once. Maybe in your welcome letter tell parents to check your website weekly and get them to sign it. Keep it on file. Put the responsibility of keeping up with class happenings on them.
     
  6. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    May 17, 2014

    You have to find a way to show that you care about each of them, personally. During the first week of school, I'd say that remembering that fact that Billy in the back is on a soccer team with a game on Saturday is probably as important, if not more so, than remembering Billy's name. Connecting with the kids is always important, but it's much more important when you have a million of them.
     
  7. applecore

    applecore Devotee

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    May 17, 2014

    Structure...and a sense of humor.

    Without the latter, you'll crumble. (But I only have had 26 and looking to have 29 for the first time this next year.)

    And at the end of each day, especially on days you feel like a dragon, offer your students as they walk out the door either a handshake, high-five, or hug. Here's why:

    You most challenging student will always remember that you made the effort to like them. You made the effort to show them, and not just tell them, that you care about who they are as a human; despite what you really think. And it gives me an opportunity to end the day with that one student who needs to hear, "Tomorrow's a new day, and I know it'll be a better day for you." as they walk out the door after we high-five. Or, better yet, he tells me on his way out the door that his mom told him she's proud of him that morning for passing his spelling test the day before. I never would have heard any of those things like that if we hadn't had that last connection.

    Whatever we find to connect to our students of 20 to 25, may we use the same thing to connect those of our 25 to 30+.

    Cheers!
     

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