SPED strategies

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Hokiegrad1993, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. Hokiegrad1993

    Hokiegrad1993 Companion

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    Jan 11, 2018

    I subbed in a SPED classroom today. The other teachers told me about a system they use called intentional ignoring. This would be where if a child is doing something he or she is not supposed to be doing you just ignore the child and not give said child the attention they are craving.

    What do you think about this strategy? I am mixed.
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    Jan 11, 2018

    There is a second part to that "system" - you must find things that they are doing right and give positive attention/praise. The things that they are doing right don't have to be perfect, but are a definite improvement. You become more exacting in giving the praise earned as the desired behavior increases, but yes, you do continue to ignore the behavior you are working to extinguish. Don't take this the wrong way, but I used to train dogs for obedience before I was a parent or teacher, and basically it is always rewarding the desired behavior and ignoring what must be punished, since any punishment is at least recognition. Most animal trainers use a form of clicker training to mark the desired behavior and then reward. You can look up clicker training to get the gist. Obviously we can't do exactly that with children, but the idea is ignore that which is not desired and reward that which is desired.
     
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  4. Hokiegrad1993

    Hokiegrad1993 Companion

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    I agree with that second part. Thank you for clarifying, The SPED teacher I was with did explain well and I had kind of gotten the gist of everything.
    :)
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Absolutely, this works wonders for some of my kids. I lavish attention on the students doing the right thing and pretend the kid doing the wrong thing isn't even there (of course I give attention the moment the child starts doing the right thing). Of course every kid is different and nothing will work with 100% of kids, but I would say this method has worked far better than any of the behavior/reward/sticker charts, timers, if/then visual, etc. that I've ever tried.
     
  6. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    Jan 12, 2018

    What do you do if the undesirable behavior affects (harms) another person? You can't just ignore that.
     
  7. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    The exception to every rule. That requires a different strategy altogether. Humming, fidgeting, dropping a pencil incessantly much different from hitting, kicking, or biting other students.
     
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  8. Hokiegrad1993

    Hokiegrad1993 Companion

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    Agreed that was not explained but I have to believe if the student was harming or bothering other students an intervention would occur. The ignoring I believe is in cases like he or she is laying down when not supposed to and wants attention from the teacher
     
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  9. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Jan 13, 2018

    unless the humming and fidgeting keeps others from learning...
     
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  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    Jan 13, 2018

    That's why we have an arsenal of strategies - the kids and situations are always changing. No one strategy will work on every child. I was mostly still trying to explain OP's original post, so in that context, there are some things that can be ignored (while praising any change to the unwanted behavior that shows improvement), and, as is so common in real life, there are some things that can't be ignored, requiring that change in strategy. SPED teachers have a boat load of different strategies, because no child or situation will ever be textbook. Sound better? ;)
     
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  11. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    Jan 14, 2018

    This year I have had the situations of a group of kids with irritating behaviors who drive each other crazy with their different behaviors. It's... interesting.
     
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  12. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    So more ways for teacher to earn an "Excedrin" head ache? They don't mention these types of classes when you are in college. This is trial by fire. Can I at least say the school year is almost half over? :hugs:
     
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