Special loans for teachers?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by rotoguy, Feb 1, 2017.

  1. rotoguy

    rotoguy New Member

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    Feb 1, 2017

    So I am 40 and have done some subbing. I love it and want to do it as a career.


    Problem is my Bachelors Degree is IT with minors in Marketing and History so I would need to go back for around 20 classes to get my teaching degree. I cannot afford this so I am wondering if there are any special type of loans someone in my position could get.

    I did take out quite a few Stafford and other loans for my first college go around when I was 29 so probably will not go that route


    Are there any new government deals I am not aware of? I was shocked to read about the loan forgiveness I was not aware of so I thought there may be something else for me I was not aware of.
     
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  3. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Feb 1, 2017

    Depending on the state, you would need to do a full year after your bachelors anyway to get your teaching credential. In the states I've taught almost no one can teach straight out of their Bachelor's.

    As for loans, you've already mentioned loan forgiveness, and that's about it I think. I've gotten all of my loans paid off, so I didn't have to really pay much of it at all. If I had known about the forgiveness programs earlier, I wouldn't have had to pay anything. The program I took advantage of was the APLE, but funding for that was getting kind of dicey after I applied for it, so I don't know whether or not it's still an option for teachers. A few of my loan providers also offered their own loan forgiveness programs, like ECSI for teachers.

    Most of them require a minimum of about 5 years of teaching in order to completely pay off your debts. At the very least it will reduce your loan amounts fairly quickly. If you are in California, I would recommend going the CSU route with credentialing because it offers full financial aid and they are way cheaper than the private schools. I would avoid the private schools like the plague because of their costs, which ultimately don't add anything special to your ability to get a job. Or just go with whatever option is cheapest in your state. I ended up taking out about 13K in loans, but I probably could have done it with just about 8-10K. I now only have about 1K left to pay off after five years, and paying very little of it myself.
     
  4. rotoguy

    rotoguy New Member

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    Feb 10, 2017

    I do worry about taking loans and wanting to teach full time, then actually finding a job. I am in southern Ohio and jobs are few and far between.

    History or Social science is what I like and I know those ARE NOT in need at all, anywhere so I am kind of between a rock and a hard space.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 10, 2017

    I was a busness major undergrad. It didn't take 20 classes to get my MSEd. Check into your local college and university ed programs
     

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