South Carolina Police object to High School reading list

Discussion in 'General Education' started by blazer, Jul 4, 2018.

  1. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jul 4, 2018

    From the article you linked, "Removing books that have been selected for their educational value solely because the ideas expressed in them conflict with some parents’ political or moral beliefs would improperly allow parents to dominate the public education process with their opinions...."

    I understand the stance of The National Coalition Against Censorship, but I also see many books chosen not for the educational or academic value but because they do support a specific opinion or moral belief of a teacher or the teachers who select the books. How is one better than another?

    Unless a school can show why those books are far superior on an academic level than a book that is not a hot topic issue, I don't see it any more of an agenda pushing drive than parents asking for the books to not be used.
     
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  4. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    They are superior because they represent an experience that is not the dominant culture. The majority of books do not address these issues, and it's impossible to separate "hot topic issues" from these experiences because they are lived by POC every day. To choose to ignore "hot topic issues" is absolutely utilizing privilege that isn't shared by all. Kids need to be exposed to multiple perspectives in order to develop an understanding of our complex world.
     
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  5. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Addendum: This is 100% why I could never live or teach in the south. :confused: I'd probably get fired.
     
  6. NewTeacher2016

    NewTeacher2016 Companion

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    Jul 4, 2018

    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2018
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  7. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    A topic doesn't make the writing superior. It may make for an interesting read, but that doesn't mean it is well written. When people judge the quality of the book based on the topic rather than the standards which students are supposed to be learning, then you can say it is superior. Otherwise, it could be a horribly written book exposing students to poor writing. There are a lot of popular books that are basically junk, but the topic is what sells the book rather than the quality of the literature.
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Yeah.... no. You would never be able to show that. Although I really enjoyed watching it.
     
  9. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Of course. Everything we teach should be a high quality instructional text...but having a "hot topic issue" shouldn't disqualify a title. Topic and writing quality are not mutually exclusive. Unfortunately many people think that stories reflecting POC, particularly stories with African American Vernacular English, are of lower quality and not worthy of being taught because they don't match the dominant culture. I simply disagree. I've had to seriously reflect on what "well written" means in my classroom as a middle class white woman.
     
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  10. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jul 4, 2018

    I agree. I'll also add the word "older" to describe myself. I've come across a powerful phrase to describe the books that we expose our students to-they should be both a window and a mirror.

    I've read The Hate U Give and wish I could use it in my class. While the content wouldn't be an issue, the language would cause concern with the grade 7 parents in my community. If I was teaching high school, I wouldn't hesitate.
     

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