So You Want to Be (or already are) an Online Educator?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by catnfiddle, Jul 13, 2014.

  1. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jul 13, 2014

    Let's make this THE thread for those who are interested in or already are teaching at virtual or blended learning schools. We can share interview tips, best practices, and frustrations here.

    I've been teaching at an online K-12 school since August of 2008 and love it at least 95% of the time. I've also been an online graduate student since January of 2013 and love it about 80% of the time. Having the experience from both sides has made a difference in my expectations of both my teaching and my learning.

    How about you?
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jul 13, 2014

    So You Want to Be/Are an Online Educator? Part Deux

    Let's make this THE thread for those who are interested in or already are teaching at virtual or blended learning schools. We can share interview tips, best practices, and frustrations here.

    I've been teaching at an online K-12 school since August of 2008 and love it at least 95% of the time. I've also been an online graduate student since January of 2013 and love it about 80% of the time. Having the experience from both sides has made a difference in my expectations of both my teaching and my learning.

    How about you?
     
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  4. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Jul 13, 2014

    Since this type of question pops up from time to time, I thought it might be a good idea to make it a sticky so it's easy to find.
     
  5. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jul 13, 2014

    Thanks!

    For starters, here are a couple of older posts I've written about teaching online:

    http://forums.atozteacherstuff.com/showthread.php?t=109754
    http://forums.atozteacherstuff.com/showthread.php?t=127596

    Also, some people have asked me about online schools in their states. The best resource for that information is here. Note that not every state has online learning below the college level. Do some research to see what the requirements are for teaching at each individual school. Most require their applicants to be Highly Qualified, which means a valid state license is a must. These schools tend to be scrutinized by the government and the media, so they have to be meticulous in their hiring process.

    Any other questions? Who is new to the experience in the fall?
     
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  6. Elocin

    Elocin Comrade

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    Jul 14, 2014

    Thanks for this and the links to prior posts! I have a 2nd interview at an online school tomorrow for HS English. I am a little nervous because I am not sure what questions to ask--I am VERY curious about the work day, but whenever I think of how I am going to phrase them, it sounds like I am asking about how heavy my workload will be, which is NOT the impression I want to give! :haha:

    I settled on "Tell me what a typical day will be like"....but even that doesn't really feel *right*.
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jul 15, 2014

    Great idea for a thread - and a stuck one! I have experienced online learning, but not 'teaching'. Almost all of my students are enrolled in online classes and I often communicate with their teachers. So, I have kind of the opposite experience as you have, cat. I have often thought about being on the other side, though.
     
  8. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jul 15, 2014

    Good questions:

    What is your curriculum? Is it designed by the teachers or pre-packaged?

    What is the ratio of synchronous to asynchronous teaching? In other words, how much is live teaching and how much is email and telephone tag? This may vary depending on grade and program (I teach a lot more synchronously with freshmen now than I did teaching seniors).

    What is the teacher mentor program for new teachers? This is equally valid for veteran teachers and those who need to go through the Resident Educator Program.
     
  9. Sunflowers

    Sunflowers Rookie

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    Jul 15, 2014

    Perfect timing!

    I'm interviewing for a k12 high school math position on Friday. I'm so excited to interview, but part of that is a 10 minute mini lesson via PowerPoint. I don't know if I'm going to have any participation from the interview panel or if it's just to demonstrate how I explain concepts. I don't even know where to begin! They only gave me a few days notice (on purpose I'm sure) so I'm just at a loss. The interview email specifically says PowerPoint and a microphone only, no other technology or platforms. Any help on how to plan such a mini lesson would be so appreciated!

    Also, I am wondering how online teaching works with those of you who have children. I have a one year old at home and I'm not sure what to do in terms of childcare. She's a very quiet, independent kid and is very content to play alone, so I'm not sure if I would need a part time nanny or what.

    Looking forward to hearing from other online educators!
     
  10. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jul 15, 2014

    Teaching with a PowerPoint and microphone isn't too bad. The trick is to avoid putting EVERYTHING in the slides. Save the majority of your words for your notes, saving the slides for images that illustrate your standard(s) and for major points the students should note. Most likely, you'll have "students". Check them for understanding by giving them a quick formative assessment, even if it's having them solve an example as a team.

    I also suggest you begin and end your presentation with a Know Understand Do list. For example, "By the end of the lesson, you will know the meaning of FOIL, you will understand why it is important to use this order to correctly solve an equation, and you will be able to use it to solve an example as your exit ticket."
     
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  11. teacherguy111

    teacherguy111 Cohort

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    Jul 19, 2014

    I have thought about this before.... My school does online virtual days instead of snow days. I have found these to be pretty stressful, with kids logging in and not really doing anything. Or not logging in and saying they had computer issues etc. I am guessing that maybe this would not happen as much with kids that are doing it full time.

    I have watched some videos from online schools. They seem to stress that it is nice to not have to be pushing kids along to get to class etc, telling them to stop talking while I'm talking and all that. What has been your experience with classroom management? Is it a plus or a minus?
     
  12. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    What platform are you using? Depending on which online teaching program you use (I personally prefer Blackboard Collaborate but have used others), you can monitor student chat and withhold privileges from those who are off-task. Heck, you can take away ALL privileges when you have something important to say, but don't do so for too long. Interaction is key to engagement.

    Speaking of engagement, getting students to log in can be the toughest part. My suggestion, if the school allows it, is to give five points for initial engagement (getting on the computer) and five extra credit points for active participation, which can be measured by an exit ticket. If the student doesn't complete the exit ticket, no extra points.
     
  13. Elocin

    Elocin Comrade

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    Jul 31, 2014

    Well, I got the job! I will be doing HS Literature. I am really nervous because I am not getting a lot of details. I start Monday but I don't know my full in-service or orientation schedule yet, which is frustrating because I have to arrange for childcare until my kids' school starts.

    I don't even know if I have a curriculum--I asked at the interview and they said it was prepared but when I spoke with my supervisor and asked if I could get any texts, resources, etc, she was like "......". We'll see..... I know there will be growing pains into a new job (and I keep reminding myself how UNHAPPY I was at my previous school) but the not knowing is scary....
     
  14. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Congratulations! It's very likely the curriculum IS already laid out for you. The shift to Common Core in most states will make the lessons new to almost everyone, so you'll be on similar footing with the majority of the faculty. The programs you'll use will become second nature.

    Have fun!
     
  15. Elocin

    Elocin Comrade

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    Thanks! That truly made me feel a lot better!:love:
     
  16. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Borrowing from the thread about the first few days of school, I wanted to give the new online teachers a gentle warning that it will be vastly different for schools like ours!

    The first few days of school are mostly insane because of the transient nature of our students. My class size tends to shrink and swell on an hourly basis, but this settles down after a week or two. Don't panic if you see your own numbers change.

    The students are also getting hit with a lot of changes to the style of curriculum as well as a new virtual classroom platform. The switch from state standards to the more rigorous Common Core will be fun enough, but my school recently made the switch from WebEx to Collaborate. I've used the latter and prefer it for teaching, but change is rough for everyone.

    My thinking is that I'm going to make several recordings of myself (making sure to use my web camera so the students have a face in mind when I call) introducing myself and my classroom policies. This includes things such as:
    • DO… call with any questions
    • DON’T… hang up if you get my voice mail
    • DO… read all of the directions
    • DON’T… create your interpretation of the assignment
    • DO… check your email at least twice a day
    • DON’T… ignore your school computer for weeks at a time

    There are silly explanations for these and more, such as, "You will make yourself miserable when you suddenly have to complete 15 assignments in a week. I probably won’t be happy while grading, either." At the very least, I recommend having the basics for our version of behavior management easily available. That way, if they do something that you've warned them against, you can point out that you've gently suggested that's a BAD IDEA.
     
  17. Elocin

    Elocin Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2014

    Catnfiddle, are your students self-paced or do they have to follow your lessons? Our students can start anywhere in the curriculum as long as they get it all done by the due dates. So I might have 5 kids reading "To Kill A Mockingbird", 2 reading "Outsiders", and 1 reading "Animal Farm", is yours similar or is everyone doing the same thing at the same time?
     
  18. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Aug 6, 2014

    Sort of?

    Students are highly encouraged to stick with me so they don't fall behind and don't get overwhelmed. I'll probably only open one week ahead of the unit I'm teaching at that time. Students who really want to work ahead tend to ask me what the next major reading assignment will be so they can find it online or at the library.

    That being said, my lessons are designed to be asynchronous and at the individual student's pace. I record all of my live teaching sessions so students can go back and review or catch them for the first time. By the time I'm writing my first set of interim report cards, I'll have students all over the place in terms of their progress and completion.
     
  19. Elocin

    Elocin Comrade

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    I understand. My units are all "open" so the kids will all be working on different things. Then we meet 1X a week for a general skills lesson and 1X a week for a specific lesson/discussion on what they are actually reading. At least, I *think* that is how it works; I'll find out more at my orientation next week.

    It seemed pretty mapped out but I have the freedom to create my own general lessons. I am nto sure if it is better to start with a review of elements of lit or do some background knowledge of the time periods of my novel, etc.
     
  20. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Aug 6, 2014

    In my experience, TKAM and Animal Farm DEFINITELY need introduction for the time period. My kids really struggled with Animal Farm when I taught it.
     
  21. Elocin

    Elocin Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2014


    Thanks! I was just using those as examples. I haven't been told yet what I will be teaching. But I agree....and both have such rich historical backgrounds I would WANT to do it anyway! :woot:
     

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