So how poor am I going to be, really?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by hbcaligirl1985, Jun 15, 2016.

  1. hbcaligirl1985

    hbcaligirl1985 Cohort

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    Jun 15, 2016

    Going back to school to do my 12 ECE Units (but in all likelihood will probably take much more) to get my Master Teaching Certificate. Since I already have a BA degree, and a my single subject teaching credential in English, all I have to do is take 12 ECE units and do one semester of field experience (which I am assuming is the pre-school version of student teaching).

    I have been told the following things:

    +You're going to starve to death and always be poor
    +You're only going to make minimum wage
    +You'll never have benefits
    +You're n better than a daycare babysitter.

    Yet on the other end of the spectrum, I've been told some pre-schools are connected to the school district and thus I'd make the same salary as a teacher in that school, and that if you work for a Montessori school you make significantly more money.

    How will my chances be different (if at all) with a BA and 1 education degree already at my disposal?

    I don't want to get into why I don't want to do Secondary anymore, I just don't, btw.
     
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  3. phillyteacher

    phillyteacher Comrade

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    Jun 15, 2016

    I think it very much depends on where you are and also what type of facility you work in. Have you looked up actual job listings in your area? They may post a salary range (or larger districts may have a salary scale).
     
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  4. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jun 15, 2016

    Average national pay for pre-school teachers is about 12 dollars an hour. Given that Montessori pays higher and school district paid pre-school teachers are paid higher (or the same), that means that almost all other positions will pay less than 12 dollars an hour. That average may also be different in your area.

    At least half of pre-school teacher positions are going to be less than 12 dollars an hour. So, you will not be wealthy by any means even if paid more. The question is, what are the chances you will be landing one of the higher paid jobs. Where are the openings? And what if your job falls through after a while. What are the chances of landing another high paying pre-school teacher position?

    I'm happy to see you are investigating in advance even if you don't end up with an answer you want.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2016
    Caesar753 likes this.
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jun 15, 2016

    This is hbcaligirl's first post since January; I don't see anything about a 40-hour work week here. a2z, I think you're confusing hbcaligirl with a newer member of A to Z.
     
  6. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jun 15, 2016

    Thanks, TeacherGroupie. I fixed my post. I appreciate it.
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jun 15, 2016

    In all honesty, preschool isn't something I'd care to get into. The pay alone is usually atrocious. I don't know how anyone could live on $10-12 per hour, sometimes less.

    Yes, there are some preschool positions that pay the same as K-12 teachers, usually when the preschool is attached to an elementary school. My own school has a preschool program, and I'm pretty sure that the teacher gets paid the same that I do. Even so, I've got to imagine that those positions are few and far between, and in very high demand.

    This just isn't a basket I'd put my eggs in.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jun 15, 2016

    I worked a preK in s high school and made HS contract salary. In my current school, we have several preK classrooms. Those teachers also make regular contracted teacher pay.

    My early childhood degree in Virginia allowed me to teach preK to grade 5. When I moved to NJ and transferred my license (plus took one additional Praxis), my license covered K-8 although I'm not considered highly qualified above grade 5

    I've taught preK, K, 2nd and 3rd.
     
  9. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Jun 15, 2016

    Are you still in So Cal? I actually wasn't aware that there were any preschool jobs in California that pay a regular teacher salary, though I've heard of it in other states. I had always assumed that Montessori and Head Start pay more, but not as much as a K-12 teacher. I know there are preschools that are connected to child development centers at a university that probably also pay more. I could of course be completely wrong. Have you checked Edjoin?

    What about teaching TK? You'd get paid the same as a classroom teacher, and you'd still be working with very young kids. Or even kinder? 1st? If your goal is early childhood, you could teach kids just a year or two older than preschool and make 2 or 3 times more money. I am not one to care much about money (I make less than most districts around me but stay because I'm happy where I am), but I do care about making at least almost a living wage.
     
  10. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jun 15, 2016

    I second the suggestion to look at job postings in your area and see what the pay is. In my area, preschool pays about $10-12 dollars per hour, like others said. The "good" ones that are connected to school systems are only paying around $15 which is better but nowhere near a regular teacher salary. Our pre-k is connected to our regular school system and they're part of our district, but they still don't get teacher pay. In contrast, a first year teacher with just a BA in my district would make about $27 an hour if you broke the salary down into hourly increments.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2016
  11. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jun 16, 2016

    I taught preschool for about 6 months at a YMCA and made minimum wage (as a teacher, not assistant!). NOT worth the effort, not a good place to work for a number of reasons, but the kids were adorable and I liked the age group! I was working right under full time, on purpose, because the center didn't want to have to provide benefits. In that specific case, I expected to be working as a teacher, but really was more like a babysitter. The school had an adopted curriculum that no one but me actually used.

    I have also seen several Head Start jobs advertised that pay around $15 for an experienced teacher. Some districts also run PreK programs that pay the same as any teaching job, but you have to be licensed. If you'll have your license, I'd say those are your best bet!
     
  12. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Jun 16, 2016

    If you are not willing or able to move to a state where PreK and PreK Handicap programs are part of the regular school district, you are going to stay poor, I fear. I would suggest investigating the possibility of adding a TOSD certification along the way, which opens up those PreK handicapped programs and puts you on the same salary guide as any other teacher in the district. Good luck!
     
  13. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    Jun 16, 2016

    I worked in daycares that paid $13-14 per hour but the cost of living was also higher in those areas.
    I moved to a "poorer" area to teach Head Start and make a few thousand a year more than my previous job. The cost of living is lower here as well so it feels like I'm making bank lol.
    We also get health, dental, & life insurance, retirement plan, 12-30 vacation days (depending on how long you've been there), paid holidays, plus we follow the district calendar (winter break, spring break, summer break, no school days, etc)
    Some Montessori schools want you to have separate Montessori certification so I was out of the running for those.
    If your districts don't have pre-k attached, look into private schools. Most of them offer pre-k and (maybe, hopefully) they'll pay the same as the upper grades.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2016
  14. eyeteach

    eyeteach Rookie

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    Jun 20, 2016

    I make 16.00 per hour teaching at a non-corporate preschool. We have health and dental benefits. We have a flex spending account too. We get two weeks off at Christmas and 8 more holidays throughout the year. We also get 3-5 weeks of Paid Time Off per year. The Montessori school down the road does not pay as well. Depending on where you live, do some research as pay can vary sharply! My friend who had her BA makes 17.50 per hour at her preschool. I do not have a BA.
     
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  15. jeepgirlsrock

    jeepgirlsrock Rookie

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    Jul 5, 2016

    I agree, it depends on where you're working. I teach pre-k through a school district and make the same amount as other teachers (about 45k per year). I was poor during grad school, but that's because I wasn't working and my husband was in retail at the time so we were on a strict budget.
     

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