Should you take recess if a child does not do their homework?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Teacher_Lyn, Sep 17, 2010.

  1. Teacher_Lyn

    Teacher_Lyn Companion

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    Sep 17, 2010

    My team sends home a homework packet on Monday that has to be returned Friday.

    Of all students, I'd say anywhere between 7 - 10 (out of 24) don't turn it in.

    Some of the teachers in our school, including a couple on my team, take recess. Like they make the kids come in their room and do the homework.

    Some send notes home and call parents.

    I only keep kids inside for bad behavior because I feel like they need to burn off energy. Plus, I consider my lunch/planning time (45 uninterupted minutes!) to be like a grown up recess and I know it would make me angry if I didn't turn something in and my P said, "Okay Ms. Lyn, you don't get a planning period today."

    I'd be unproductive the entire day because I didn't get my down time.

    Since it's first quarter and progress reports are due in next Friday, I thought next Monday, I would send the missing homework home with a note to parents saying(politely), "This is the first and last time I will be sending make up homework. After this, it's a zero."

    Thoughts?
     
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  3. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Well, IMHO, I think it is better for the student to keep his or her recess. I send a note home to the parents when homework is not done, but that's it. I only take recess when the student misbehaves, and it's 5 minutes when they get to orange, and a full recess when they hit red. I think recess is important for the students so they can burn off some of their energy, plus it gives them a break so they are ready to come into class and learn. I also like to have my lunch break too, another reason why taking away recess is not something I like to do.
     
  4. texteacher

    texteacher Companion

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    When I taught second grade, I made them do their homework outside during recess. It was at an inner city school where there was little parent involvement so it was the only way of motivating most kids. But I rarely had to take recess away because nobody wanted to sit out, do their homework, and watch all of their friends get to play. I might have one or two kids have to do their homework outside every week which wasn't too bad and as soon as they finished it (and it was done well) I let them play.
     
  5. Teacher_Lyn

    Teacher_Lyn Companion

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    Sep 17, 2010

    That's an interesting idea! Maybe I can try that since i like being outside, though I DO like my planning time. lol
     
  6. texteacher

    texteacher Companion

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    Well I have to be outside with my class at recess no matter what so I couldn't leave those kids inside anyway! But it really does motivate them. They see everybody else playing and having a good time. Most kids only do their homework outside a few times a year because they really really do not want to sit on the pavement and do work.
     
  7. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    I used to do it and would have them go outside to do their homework while they heard and saw all the kids having fun. This year, I'm trying something different. Because i have so many kids, I cannot possibly be keeping track of who turns it in and organize them missing recess and so forth. I have other things to worry about. With that said, I am documenting who is not finishing it and it will be documented on their report card. During conferences, it will be a tool to use to explain ONE reason why they are not performing at a 2nd grade level.

    As always, there are exceptions to what is going on. SO, I tell the parents if it's too hard or takes them longer than ____ minutes to complete, to please let me know so I can adjust it if necessary.
     
  8. Teacher_Lyn

    Teacher_Lyn Companion

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    Sep 17, 2010

    That's an excellent point. :thumb: I keep forgetting that several of my parents are not native English speakers, so maybe they are having some trouble helping their children because they cannot read the directions. It would be like someone sending a reading assignment to me in German. I wouldn't know where to begin.

    I think I'll send home a note with kids who are not bringing it back n a regular basis to see if the problem is an issue of language or being too hard. :thumb:
     
  9. texteacher

    texteacher Companion

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    We write the directions for the homework in English and Spanish and the directions are the exact same each week so once they get in the routine, they can do it.
     
  10. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Oh, one thing I do, do with my kids is if we are working on something that is unfinished, I have made them come in to finish it at recess, but they leave as soon as they have finished. Yes, it is very motivating. I do this mainly because I have about 3 boys in my class who will literally sit there and do nothing. I have to be on them constantly to work.
     
  11. Teacher2Be123

    Teacher2Be123 Companion

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    Could you have it due on Thursday and then if a student doesn't bring it them nothing is held against them UNLESS it isn't brought back on Friday? Where I student taught we sent homework home on Monday and it was due back on Thursday. We wrote down the names of the students that didn't have it then and they got a reminder notice to bring it back the next day. If they brought it back they got fun friday if they didn't they had to finish their homework in school.

    This was a school implemented idea so much so that they had one of the "extra" teachers both after school and on Fridays in the library for us to send our students to who had to finish their homework.
     
  12. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 17, 2010

    The only problem with giving a zero, particularly to a young kid, is that it ensures that the work won't ever get done if they miss that deadline.

    Could you instead offer a bottom out grade-- it it's late, it earns a maximum grade of 70? That way there's still incentive for the kid to do the homework, and to take from it what you intended when you assigned it.
     
  13. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Sep 17, 2010

    I just give pennies (part of my incentive system) for those who do complete homework. I take note of those who do not (thank goodness homework only consists of reading this year), but I don't punish them. I teach 1st... and I don't really believe in homework for 6 year olds (besides reading). Thank goodness my team finally feels the same way.
     
  14. Toast

    Toast Companion

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    Sep 17, 2010

    I hate taking away lunch recess since it's my personal lunch break. I personally need the downtime. I give my kids fun friday every week (the same day the homework packet is due). If you don't turn in your homework, you sit in the hallway during fun friday and work on your homework instead of playing the game or having the free time of fun friday.
     
  15. Toast

    Toast Companion

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    Oh! Also, I award a certain number of Fun Friday minutes per kid who turns in their homework.

    So for example: I have 27 kids in the class and if all 27 kids turn in their homework, they get 27 minutes of free time or game time for fun friday. I will also throw in extra minutes if say everyone puts it in the basket without me having to remind them.
     
  16. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Sep 17, 2010

    If your P had told you he needed a report by Thursday morning and you didn't have it ready by then, I would absolutely expect him/her to say "I need this by the end of your planning period today!" The same applies to students.

    Of course, I teach middle school, so they are old enough to accept more responsibility for the homework assignments. Our school uses a discipline log for recording "checks". Students can get checks for disruptive behavior, coming to class without their books, not having their homework completed, etc. If they get two checks in one day or three checks in one week (IIRC), they lose break for 1 day. They have to sit on the sidewalk with the teachers while their classmates play.

    Sometimes, if a teacher has a number of students that didn't complete an assignment, (s)he will make them stay in during break to work on the assignment.

    I think both of these options are perfectly acceptable, especially at the middle school level. Some kids just aren't motivated by anything else.
     

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