Should I speak up? LTS Assignments

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by MsKelsey, Mar 18, 2019.

  1. MsKelsey

    MsKelsey Rookie

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    Mar 18, 2019

    *Update*
    I was simply unaware of the duties of a LTS and was under the impression that I would have a lot more guidance through the curriculum (as that's how the teacher made it seem).
    It makes me feel better doing the work now knowing it is what was expected of me as a LTS.
    I am going to tough it out until the end of the school year. Every day it feels easier to lesson plan, but harder in terms of the students' attitude towards the class.
    I have decided to start treating the class as my own instead of trying to treat it as hers. That made it a lot more difficult because I was teaching a class the way someone else would vs the way I would.
    **
    I am currently long term subbing a Spanish class for a teacher who is out on maternity leave. I got the position because the teacher and I have a mutual friend who recommended me. When I began the assignment I was given given enough lessons to last the next two weeks.

    Well the two weeks are up and she hasn't given me anymore direction for them. When I ask her what she wants them to work on, she tells me to look for worksheets in the workbook to give them or to have them do an oral activity. I don't want to give her a hard time because she's now got a 2 w/o but I'm assembling activities/worksheet packets, grading them, entering in the grades, and even calling parents. The students are getting harder to work with every day because they are tired of these worksheets and having a sub in general. While I speak Spanish, I have a very hard time teaching and explaining it. I am beginning to feel very burnt out. My income requires me to work another job so I don't have much time outside of school. I often grade during class or on my lunch break and planning period, this teacher likes to give them 6/7 grades per week.
    This school district also has a "Mainstream" special ed system meaning I have high functioning SpEd students in my classes who are a pleasure but it creates a LOT more work for me because they complete alternative assignments and most students need to be worked with 1 on 1 or else they won't do the work at all.

    Should I speak up about the lesson planning? I don't want to get her in trouble or give her a hard time especially because I am lucky to have found the LTSP and I'm not a mom but can only assume she's got a lot going on. I don't want to make my friend regret recommending me but I feel that because the teacher's maternity leave ends two days before the last day of school that she's already in "summer vacation" mode.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019
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  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Mar 18, 2019

    I know that different districts have different expectations, but here the LTS is considered the teacher of record and is responsible for all planning, grading, reporting, etc., while they are in the position.
     
  4. MsKelsey

    MsKelsey Rookie

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    Mar 18, 2019

    That's what I was thinking, I wouldn't have an issue if I were getting paid significantly more but my district gives a $15/day raise, which is nice but it doesnt feel like enough for the workload.
    I'll probably just tough it out.
    Thanks!
     
  5. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Mar 18, 2019

    I have never worked in a school where the teacher had to supply more than 2 weeks plans for a long term sub. It is the subs responsibility and doing a good job in that extended position often gives the sub an opportunity for the full time position when the teacher chooses not to return.
     
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  6. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Mar 18, 2019

    Around here it's common for LTS to be paid the same rate as a sub unless the assignment is at least 61 or 91 or more days long. So if it's a 6-8 week maternity leave for example, they just get the same rate as a regular per diem sub. But even with that low pay, they are expected to do all the duties of a regular teacher. I think many people who take a LTS job see it as a resume builder and possible "in" with a district and know it's going to be way more work than being a per diem sub taking random assignments each day.

    My first job was a 12 week LTS job and I was paid the per diem rate (this district followed the 91 or more days rule for it to be a regular teacher pay). As it turned out, the teacher extended her leave after being out about 10 weeks so it ended up being about 6 months so my pay switched (retroactively) to regular pay. But even when I was getting about $120 per day (this was in 2008 so I can't recall the exact daily rate) I did everything a regular teacher did - planning, grading, parent emails. etc. Her leave started earlier than planned so I didn't even have a day's worth of lessons for me. We were supposed to overlap for a week, but instead I showed up on my first day and she was already out on leave.

    So, does it stink to do all that extra work for such low pay? Absolutely. But around here at least, that's just how it goes with LTS jobs that aren't a few months long. And a teacher out on a LTS leave would not be expected to provide anything beyond lessons for the first week or so. They might enter report card grades if the bulk of the marking period was with them, but that's about it.

    If you feel it's too much work and you're not a good fit, and you don't hope to be hired as a teacher in this district, you may want to let the principal know you'll stick around until a replacement is found, but that it's more work than you are able to handle due to your second job. If you do hope to eventually get a full time job in this district then I would encourage you to just do as good of a job as you can and instead of thinking about the low pay, think about what it can lead to. Because you're right, the daily sub rate is really low for all the work you have to do!
     
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  7. MsKelsey

    MsKelsey Rookie

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    Whenever I started as a sub I really wanted to become a teacher, and it was initially why I was so eager to become a LTS, I do feel that I wasn't as informed about the duties of a LTS as I should've been before starting. I think I'm just a little burnt out on teaching all together, if I could focus on it I think I would still love it but it's hard when I'm spread so thin. I also feel that I am trying to "run" the classroom the same way that the teacher did and it's probably what is making things feel a lot harder because it's not how I would run my own classroom.
    My district pays $80 to degreed subs and adds $15 to LTS after the 10th day but with the way the pay periods are set up and (and thanks to Spring Break having me miss 5 workdays) I won't really feel the benefits of the $15+ until next month.
    I'm going to try to stick out out, I'm hoping that once I do begin to receive a little more income I'll be able to work less hours as a tutor and have a little bit more time to focus on school.
     
  8. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Mar 18, 2019

    That sounds very common.

    We didn’t even get a boost in pay. I did a full 12 (or maybe longer?) weeks for regular sub pay. I did all planning, grading, and other duties, including meetings.
     
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  9. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    Mar 18, 2019

    Sorry, but as a LTS in my district, you would be responsible for writing your own plans after a couple of weeks - regardless of pay.
     
  10. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    Mar 18, 2019

    Same with my district - LTS do all the duties of a regular certified teacher, that's why they're paid more, and for us, the higher pay starts after 15 consecutive days. If there's a no school day, it doesn't count as you missing a day. So for us, spring break wouldn't matter. Your days before and after would count towards the 15 days. And once you hit the 16th day, you get all the back pay for the first 15 days. After that, if you take a day off, you'd still get the higher pay so they tell you to work the first 15 days straight before taking a day off.

    I've been LTS-ing this entire school year from day one for a vacancy. I do my own lessons, I get prep time, I even have dismissal duty. The other teachers & students don't even know I'm a sub unless I tell them (so a lot of my coworkers know, but none of the kids do because that wouldn't make a difference to them)

    My sister was a LTS at the end of last year for a month. The teacher (maternity leave) left a week or two's worth of lessons so she'd know what they were working on, and then after that, she was free to make her own lessons. She loved it.
     
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  11. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Mar 19, 2019

    When I was a LTS the teacher left an ELA novel for them to read and a vocabulary workbook. That's it. I had to do everything from planning to creating lessons. I would go to the department head and ask to see the curriculum for the class so at least you have some direction.
     
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  12. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Mar 21, 2019

    When I was out for surgery for a month last year, I was told to have 1 week's lesson done with all the copies made. I actually made plans for the whole month (+ a few days for just in case) with room for flexibility, slow down, but if going too fast, there are additional assignments. I think I made copies for almost 2 weeks.
    Usually a teacher who is coming back within the same year expects certain things to be done and taught, because overall she will be responsible for the grades, so the teacher should have a plan of what needs to be taught and covered but it's not really their job to lesson plan every day in detail.
    In most places LTSs either need a credential, be in the credential program or at least have passed a subject matter exam (Praxis or CSET, etc) and they are expected to ruin the classroom and have everything done.

    I loved it when I was subbing, even if for just a few weeks, I had a steady job for the time period, I knew where I would be the next day and I could plan classes I would teach. Often it's hard to teach a class someone else planned due to different styles or the plans are confusing. And anything over 3 weeks looks good on a resume.
     
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