Should I accept this position?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by AntM1564, Aug 8, 2017.

  1. AntM1564

    AntM1564 Rookie

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    Aug 8, 2017

    I am currently a part time high school Social Studies teacher at a small private school in CT. The Social Studies market in CT is bleak and competitive. I went on three or four interviews and was not offered anything. I was offered a job in CO, but the pay was too low for me to move all the way out there with no backup plan.

    The school I work at currently is looking for a librarian/media specialist. This would be a full time position, with benefits, unlike my current role with the school. I am going to interview for the position, but I am wondering how this could affect me in the future.

    If I was offered this position, and accepted it, how would future employers view my resume next year? Would they hold it against me that I was not in the classroom for one year? Essentially, I am worried that this will hurt me in the long run, in term of finding another teaching position, but for me personally, this would be a better situation since it is a full time position. I love being in the classroom would would hate for this to be held over my head in the future.

    Additionally, this position would allow me to go back and get my MA and potentially get certified for a librarian/media specialist.
     
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  3. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Rookie

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    Aug 8, 2017

    Wait. I'm confused. If you aren't certified for it, how would you be able to accept the position anyway? Either way, I don't think it would hurt you in the long run. In fact, the experience may even be looked upon favorably, but I am just confused how you could have the position without certification.
     
  4. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Groupie

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    Aug 8, 2017

    It's a private school. You'll be doing more teaching than you realize. Take the job, it will show current school wanted to keep you as full time. I know a teacher who took part time media specialist in a public school (no cert either) and then left mid year after landing full time job elsewhere.
     
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  5. bella84

    bella84 Enthusiast

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    Aug 8, 2017

    I think the full time library/media job may look better on your resume than the part-time social studies job. I'd recommend you take it if it is offered to you.
     
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  6. Mshope2012

    Mshope2012 Rookie

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    Aug 8, 2017

    I would take it. Full time with benefits sounds pretty good. Plus, you can see if you would be interested in pursuing a library degree. The media specialist description might also be attractive to some futures schools. STEM is so big these days. Maybe you can do a lot with technology?

    I also agree that you might be teaching more than you think.
     
  7. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 9, 2017

    Our teacher-librarian does a lot of teaching. She:
    - collaborates with teachers and classes when students are working on inquiry assignments
    - does book talks and author talks
    - teaches lessons on digital citizenship, research skills, digital tools, genre, library skills
    - holds reading conferences with students

    I agree that the full time position will only benefit you; take it if it is offered.
     
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  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 9, 2017

    The Library Media Specialist position almost certainly includes teaching, like to the tune of at least 50% of your daily responsibilities. While you may not have a traditional classroom or a roster for which you are the designated teacher of record, you will surely be working closely with students. I believe that this position would be looked at more favorably than a part-time classroom position. Are you qualified for it?
     
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  9. AntM1564

    AntM1564 Rookie

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    Thank you so much everyone. We run a block schedule; there are four classes each day. The librarian last year, now Dean, taught one of the periods. It was AP US History and he is the only Social Studies teacher certified to teach AP. He is going to teach AP US History as well this year. I hope I will teach with this position.

    I have the interview at 10 AM tomorrow. I will report back with more specifics, but it seems like everyone is in agreement that this position would be better for benefits, resume wise, and it might teach me something to us in the future.
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 9, 2017

    When I said that the librarian will likely teach, I don't mean that the librarian will also hold a regular classroom position separate from the library stuff. I mean that the librarian will teach information literacy skills, research sills, organizational skills, etc., usually in conjunction with the ELA teachers or other departments.
     
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  11. AntM1564

    AntM1564 Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2017

    Also, here is the description on the website. This will clear up why I can assume this position without the proper endorsement.

    POSITION:
    LIBRARY MEDIA SPECIALIST (Grades 9-12)

    REPORTS TO:
    Administration

    SUPERVISES:
    Library Media Center

    POSITION SUMMARY:
    The Library Media Specialist collaborates with teaching staff in the development of student literacy through the administration of the library media program, provides specialized instruction to students and teaching staff, and oversees the selection, organization, utilization, and maintenance of library, information, technology, and curriculum resources. The mission of the library media program is to ensure that students are informed Digital Citizens and effective users of ideas and information.
    The Library Media Specialist reports to the principal, and works with Department Chairs, other school librarians, and district curriculum and technical staff to coordinate library and educational technology programs. The Library Media Specialist interacts daily with students, teachers, parents, administrators, and other district staff.

    RESPONSIBILITIES:
    1. Teaching and Learning
    The Library Media Specialist fosters the development of information finding, analyzing and problem-solving skills to support investigations and encouraging users to become skilled creators of information and ideas by:
    Reading Advocacy
    • reinforcing strategy-based reading instruction to help students make meaning from text and supporting students’ interaction with a variety of genre as reflected in district curriculum guides; and
    • promoting student and staff reading for information and pleasure; maintaining a library culture that encourages appreciation of literature; supporting school reading incentive programs, providing book talks and reading consultations for students and staff.
    Information Access and Delivery
    • collaborating with classroom teachers in the preparation, presentation, and evaluation of units or assignments that utilize information resources;
    • assisting staff and students in using knowledge meaningfully for decision making and problem solving;
    • providing instruction for students and staff in the use of print and electronic reference tools and information literacy processes;
    • assisting staff and students with strategies for intellectual access to information and ideas for learning (finding, judging, and using information) that they can use within and beyond school settings;
    • providing information and instruction in areas of information literacy, the Research Cycle, Acceptable Use Policy, ethics, intellectual property and copyright, and use of educational technologies;
    • Collecting and organizing student Acceptable Use Policy and Photo Consent Forms
    • promoting the integrated use of technology as a learning tool; and
    • creating and maintaining the school website and social media.
    2. Program Administration/Management
    The Library Media Specialist establishes and coordinates efficient systems to enhance the use of information resources by:
    • creating and implementing procedures for library media center operations including, but not limited to: planning and evaluation, budgeting, access, student and teacher use, instruction, services, facilities, and collection development (selection, acquisition, cataloging, processing, inventory, weeding);
    • developing and maintaining a diversified library collection of print, non-print, and electronic resources to support curricular needs, the development of student literacy, and the interests of the students, using up-to-date review sources and selection practices;
    • maintaining circulation systems for library, processional, and curriculum materials;
    • creating an environment and implementing systems to promote intellectual and physical access to library media materials and equipment;
    • assisting in the selection, assignment, and supervision of classified library media staff, volunteers, and student assistants;
    • scheduling the library media facilities for instruction and supervising student use; and
    • coordinating the school’s computer and AV resources (labs, materials, and network) as related to information resources, network and e-mail accounts, and working with technicians to prioritize work orders.
    3. Leadership/Collaboration
    The Library Media Specialist provides leadership, instruction, and consulting assistance in the use of literature, leading edge instruction and information technology by:
    • modeling instructional strategies and coaching staff members in the integration of information literacy strategies and technology with curriculum;
    • encouraging and fostering leadership in others;
    • leading the school technology committee, and/or participating in the leadership committee and other curriculum committees; and
    • participating as a learner and teacher in district wide meetings, in-service, and committees.
    4. Other
    Perform such other duties and assume such other responsibilities as assigned by the building principal, or designee.
    QUALIFICATIONS:
    • Valid Connecticut teaching certification with endorsement appropriate for grade level preferred.
    • Degree with emphasis in library resources, technology, or comparable program preferred.
    • Successful experience as a classroom teacher preferred.
    • Library media specialist experience preferred.
    • Experience teaching, modeling, and coaching educational technology for both students and staff.
    • Demonstrated ability to work successfully with staff and students.
    • Such alternatives to the above qualifications as the administration may find appropriate and acceptable.
     
  12. vickilyn

    vickilyn Maven

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    Aug 9, 2017

    Private schools tend to have greater leeway in "such alternatives to the above qualifications as the administration may find appropriate and acceptable." If you are interested in becoming a library media specialist, then I would certainly go to school on the employers dime, if at all possible. You may want to find out just what is involved to acquire that endorsement. A very quick scan indicates as few as 7 courses up to 12 courses, and if your state has Praxis exams, there is a Praxis II for this endorsement. States vary in what it takes to become certified in different endorsements, so you would need to find out what CT would require. If they are willing to hire you for the position and you believe you can do it, take the job. I would suggest, however, that you do start coursework to meet the state criteria if you want to keep the job. You never know when a certified teacher with those credentials may come on staff, and then they would be inclined to go with that individual unless you are taking the courses to become qualified.
     

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