Shortage? What do you think?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by geoteacher, Aug 24, 2018.

  1. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/americas-new-education-crisis-a-teacher-shortage/

    What do you think? This is certainly the case in my area. I teach social studies - which never has vacancies - and schools are even struggling to fill those. One would think this would make it easier for beginning teachers, but that often isn’t the case. Area universities are not finding it easy to place student teachers - partly due to testing pressures and other teacher evaluation items like SLOs
     
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  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Yet there are posts on this board and others about people not able to get teaching jobs. I think there may be shortages in some areas or subjects. I also think that in some schools they have applicants but turn them down for a variety of reasons depending on the district.
     
  4. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    I think there might be a shortage in some specific subjects in some areas. I don't think there is a shortage of elementary or Social Studies teachers in most places. There is definitely not a shortage in my state -- Massachusetts.
     
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  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    DH’s school just started the year short two English teachers.

    We had ONE candidate for our math position, and only two applicants were interested in our science position.

    We have had several younger teachers leave teaching the last couple of years.
     
  6. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Devotee

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    Definitely depends on area!
    My hometown - wealthy families, top public schools - hundreds of applicants for one position.
    Moved couple hours south (same state) - worst schools in the state - hundreds of vacancies, many filled by long term subs, very few applicants - huge shortage!
     
  7. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    In my area, (about 5 school districts) the schools hire year round and traditionally begin the school year well over 100 teachers short.
     
  8. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I agree it depends on the area. Areas that don't treat/pay teachers well certainly have shortages. We have shortages in certain areas. For a generic elementary position, we get way less applicants than in previous years, but we don't have any trouble filling the positions. We used to get several hundred applicants per job and now we'll get maybe 20. So the candidate pool isn't what admin would like, but it's nothing like what I hear about in other places where they're starting the year with tons of vacancies. We had a 5th grade teacher quit 2 days before school started and I was really nervous about that position being filled, but it was!
     
  9. Aces

    Aces Cohort

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    I was going to say the same thing (I didn't realize we were in the same neck of the woods!). It seems like we're saturated.
     
  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    ^
    Many of my new colleagues did long term sub jobs right out of college and they teach social studies and special ed. I teach middle school math which made it easier and all of my friends that graduated from my university got math jobs.
     
  11. vickilyn

    vickilyn Guru

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    I believe that a fair number of teachers go into SPED to make sure that they get a job, but, sadly, a fair number of those are wondering how to get a Gen.Ed. job in a relatively short period of time. I know that we have seen the threads on this forum where they are considering relinquishing their SPED certification because they desperately want out of SPED. I teach SPED in my content certifications, and honestly didn't think that this would be my cup of tea. However, I have found a home in SPED, especially since it is a TOSD, which means I can only teach SPED in my content certifications, which I love. Although I have Elem. Ed. certification, that would not be where I would choose to teach SPED. My MS certs, however, ELA, SS, and Science work well for me. I should make it clear that I always saw myself as a MS teacher, and my K-12 Science certification sent me into the HS education, so it is all good. My observation has been that math and science should get you a job, ELA in MS will almost certainly get you a job, but my MS SS certification is simply to be useful to my work place, since I have the TOSD, and we have MS students. I did not have trouble finding a job, and I am grateful that my certifications are all in fields that I love.
     
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  12. mrsf70

    mrsf70 Companion

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    Elementary has had many opening in area districts here the last couple of years. Math, science, and special education always have openings. Even wealthier districts have had trouble filling special education here.
     
  13. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    In my state, you can be terminated if you are hired with certifications, let them lapse, and they want to place you in a position for which you were certified at the time of hire.
     
  14. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    I can see why that would happen. Choosing a candidate isn't just about the immediate need, it is often about the total benefit to the district or school. By allowing a certification to lapse you just became less valuable to them. It may be that while weaker for the immediate position the hire allowed more flexibility for the district. By allowing certifications to lapse, that benefit is now gone.

    To me it is no different than an employee in a different profession telling the company they will not change positions because they don't want to use specific skills. IT would be a good example of that by saying they won't program in a certain language that they listed on their resume.
     
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  15. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    ,
     
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  16. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    I would like to see information, yes I am lazy with this and don't want to research, the cost between using long term subs for positions vs subs or teachers. It may actually be a financial benefit to not hire full-time teachers. If the school isn't a "high performing" school, it may be a strategy to keep positions open both financially and for a good reason the school is not performing.
     
  17. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    .
     
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  18. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    .
     
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  19. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    I'm not saying it is a good strategy, but I believe that is part of the problem we are seeing with districts that have "shortages".

    You are right that it is not in the best interest to the students, but if the district believes that the student's ability to do well is controlled by their family's income then how would bringing on a full time teachers at a greater cost really benefit the student or the bottom line. The argument about family SES means teachers are almost completely irrelevant. So, in tight financial times, why not hire based on budget because the students will not succeed either way.
     
  20. otterpop

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    "The teacher shortage emerged in the wake of the Great Recession, when school districts cut their staffing as funding dried up."

    "Teachers are earning almost 2 percent less than they did in 1999 and 5 percent less than their 2009 pay, according to the Department of Education. "

    Although pay is a contributing factor, I disagree that the shortage is only due to pay issues. We do have a shortage in my area.

    I often think about leaving the profession. I don't know that I will actually do it, because I enjoy actually teaching, but the bureaucracy of it really bothers me. It's unfortunate that the recession came at a similar time (right before) other changes that started to be implemented in US schools, such as Common Core and standardized testing at a federal level. It makes it harder to see the root cause of the shortage.

    Poor pay is one thing. Rightly or not, teachers for decades have been willing to put up with low pay because they liked what they were doing and they felt like they were making a difference. Now, teachers of grades as young as kindergarten are preparing students to fill in bubbles on standardized tests. When students don't do well on tests that aren't developmentally appropriate anyway, the teachers get blamed. There's less parental support and behaviors are worsening as consequences are being taken off the table. On top of all that, most teachers are working overtime because the jobs they are asked to do should often be the jobs of two professionals (a teacher and an aide, a teacher and an intervention specialist, or even just two separate teachers if class sizes are high). This isn't the case everywhere, I'm sure, but it does paint an ugly picture for someone making future career choices.

    Personally, I wish there was less focus on teacher pay and more focus on what else is causing teachers to leave the profession. There are definitely states/areas where pay needs to increase because the wages are not livable, but teachers would still feel spread thin if pay were to go up.
     
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  21. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    I can honestly say, I don't remember a time where there wasn't a "teacher shortage".
     

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