Severe/Profound Classroom Schedules

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by inhisgrip20, Jun 20, 2008.

  1. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Jun 20, 2008

    Hi Teachers,

    I teach students with severe/profound intellectual disaiblities. This is my 4th year. I want to try a different classroom schedule this year. If you teach a similar group will you please share your classroom schedule/activities. I'll start:

    7:15 – 7:30 Arrival (in gym until bell rings)
    7:30 – 8:00 Breakfast/Pledge and Morning Announcements
    8:00 – 8:30 Bathroom/Self-help Skills (toothbrushing)
    8:30 – 9:00 Circle Time
    9:00 – 9:30 Morning Work (pre-academics/fine motor skills)
    9:30 – 10:00 MeVille to WeVille lesson
    10:00 – 10:30 Bathroom/Prepare for lunch
    10:30 – 11:15 Lunch in Cafeteria
    11:15 – 11:30 Bathroom/Self-help Skills (toothbrushing)
    11:30 – 12:00 Leisure Skills
    12:00 – 12:30 Work Boxes/Independent work
    12:30 – 1:00 Story and Art Activity
    1:00 – 1:30 Specials (Music/Art/PE)
    1:30 – 1:45 Snack Time
    1:45 - 2:00 Bathroom
    2:00 – 2:15 Pack up and Departure

    Of course this schedule changes slightly on days we have PT, OT, Speech, and Community Trips.

    What is a typical schedule in your classroom?
     
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  3. Ghost

    Ghost Habitué

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    Jun 20, 2008

    My schedule was nearly the same, except I never used times.
    Mevilleto Wevill (what is that???)

    arrival/coats/breakfast
    announcements/pledge/aerobics
    toileting
    am circle & calendar
    group math lesson
    individual math lessons/independent work stations
    sensory activities
    toileting
    recess/lunch
    toileting
    p.m. circle
    group reading lesson
    individualized reading lesson/independent work stations
    leisure skills
    snack/toileting
    fine arts
    music/singing/story time
    toileting
    pack up/PM announcements/departure

    Does that help?
     
  4. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Jun 20, 2008

    MeVille to WeVille - - Is that the name of your social skills lesson? That's awesome!!
     
  5. franny

    franny Rookie

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    Jun 20, 2008

    I know this is getting off topic but how do you use MeVille to WeVille in your classroom? Do you use it for social skills? I went to a website about it and it said it had activities that focused on:
    Reading activities.
    * Vocabulary and word wall activities.
    * Writing activities.
    * Creating books.
    * Art projects.
    * Games.
    * Brainstorming.
    * Relationship building.

    It doesn't say the sole focus is social skills but is that part of it? Are there lots of areas the program covers that are too hard for your students, like for example writing activities?
     
  6. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Jun 20, 2008

    Thanks Trinda... I've thought of adding an afternoon circle time too, but I always run out of time. What types of activities do you do during your afternoon circle? My morning circle consists of calendar, weather, attendance (identifying their picture/name), identifying body parts, and a few other things.

    MeVille to WeVille is a curriculum developed by AbleNet for the elementary level. It's a literacy program that integrates, reading, writing, speaking, listening and augmentative communication. There are 3 different units.... Me, My Family, and My School. We're required to use this curriculum in my county.
     
  7. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Jun 20, 2008

    Hey Franny, Yes that's accurate. It includes activities for each of those areas during for each section. All of the materials are already created for you and come with the curriculum, you just have to make copies for your students. The lessons are very simple. The first unit is all about "Me"... so the students "write stories" using picture symbols, about themselves and different things, they make posters describing themselves, they play games using their names, work on simple concepts such as boy/girl. Many of the activities are a little high for my students with more profound disabilities and I find that I still have to adapt alot of the materials to suit them. But it does have plenty of good ideas and starts building basic literacy. If nothing else it gives plenty of opportunities for my students to communicate using their assistive devices.
     
  8. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Fanatic

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    Jun 20, 2008

    The Meville to Weville sounds interesting. I'm going to check it out. My schedule includes:
    8:30-Morning work/Circle Time
    9:00-Specials or Health
    9:30-snack/sensory time
    10:00-Language Arts/Individual work/Speech
    11:00-Lunch
    11:30-Hygiene (toothbrushing) and Leisure
    12:00-Math
    12:30-Special or OT/PT
    1:00-Game time or group activity
    1:30-Science or Social Studies
    2:00-Classroom Jobs/prepare for dismissal
     
  9. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Jun 20, 2008

    Meville to Weville sounds cool! I am going to have to check it out.

    I teach in a moderate/severe setting, but the class right next door is severe/profound. Our S/P teacher was out on FMLA for 6 months this school year, and I ran both classrooms.

    7:00 Breakfast
    7:30 Hygiene/Bathroom
    7:45 School Wide Morning News Television Program / Pledges
    8:00 Circle Time (Calendar, Social Skills Songs, Weather, Counting, Alphabet, colors, months, days, etc.)
    8:30 Story (varies from book on tape, group activity, teacher led, etc.)
    8:50 Bathroom
    9:00 Rotation 1 (half work on independent work stations- to include fine motor, pre-academic, vocational, independence skills, half work on IEP goals activities with paras and teacher)
    9:30 Rotation 2 (switch)
    10:00 Bathroom
    10:10 Leisure/Sensory break
    10:20 Specials (Music/Art/PE)
    11:10 Hygiene/Bathroom
    11:20 Lunch
    12:00 Recess
    12:30 Bathroom/Hygiene
    12:40 Phonics/Handwriting (varies for each kid.. some are working on pre-writing skills such as hand-eye coordination, some are doing tactile letters, etc.)
    1:00 Afternoon Lesson Rotation
    Monday- Language Arts Focus
    Tuesday- Math Focus
    Wednesday- Science Focus
    Thursday- Social Studies Focus
    Friday- Daily Living/Cooking Focus
    1:45 Bathroom/Hygiene
    1:55 Leisure/Sensory Break
    2:10 Snack
    2:20 Backpack/Pack up
    2:30 Bus
     
  10. franny

    franny Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2008

    Okay, I'm veering off topic again, hope you don't mind. To all of you who teach social skills, do you use a particular program/curriculum or do you have a good resource for the lessons you do? I have a new class just one year old and I sorely neglected direct teaching of social skills this past year. I've never taught a class of students with moderate cognitive disabilities before this year and am just not sure how to go about teaching social skills. We indirectly worked on them through the course of the day but I know that I am expected to teach social skills as part of my curriculum. Help!
     
  11. franny

    franny Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2008

    Teachersk and Trinda, could you give me some examples of your independent learning activities? I desperately need to have some independent work for the kiddos who are waiting their turn for direct instruction on IEP goals with me or a para. This past year, I just let them choose from our choice time menu activities like computer (academic stuff), read independently in reading corner, puzzles, etc., when not being worked with directly. What kinds of independent tasks do your kids do?
     
  12. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Jun 21, 2008

    Hey Franny, I know your last question was directed toward Teachersk and Trinda but I thought I'd jump in too. My kids may be a little lower functioning than yours but for independent work I have my students do work boxes. I'm sure you've heard of the shoebox tasks but here are lots of great examples you can make yourself:

    http://www.blaine.wednet.edu/bes/class/Klemmt/html file/workjobs.html

    http://members.aol.com/Room5/tasks.html

    http://www.preschoolfun.com/pages/teacch work jobs.htm

    http://www.tasksgalore.com/Taskofthemonth.htm
     
  13. Ghost

    Ghost Habitué

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    Jun 21, 2008

    I love using Skillstreaming for Early Childhood. The pictures are perfect for my kiddos.
     
  14. Ghost

    Ghost Habitué

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    Jun 21, 2008

    I had 3 drawer storage boxes from WalMart at each work station and a different activity in each drawer. One was for LA, one for math, and one for what the kiddo really needed to work on. A couple of the higher kids had worksheets. Most had file folder games. I'll find the website in a bit that helped me. I had a lot of hands on activities--sorting (snack tray with the items to be sorted in the dip area), fine motor (clothes pin activities, sorting coins and putting in containers through the slot, peg board, lacing, tracing stencils, coloring pages based on their interests, etc.) You can check online for shoebox tasks, TEACCH work tasks, independent work tasks, work jobs, or file folder games. A lot of the autism sites have good pictures. I can't find anything since I moved my stuff home or I'd send you some pictures. Hope it helps! Oh, PM circle was a lot of repetition: afternoon weather, review fine arts schedule for the day, graphing lunch choices, social skills, and usually a quick art activity.

    www.preschoolprintables.com fantastic work station ideas and many are free to print I hope this posts---it's deleted itself 4 times now!:unsure:
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2008
  15. franny

    franny Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2008

    Wow, thank you so much inhisgrip! I get the idea now. I just have to come up with more academic based tasks, most of those tasks shown in the links you posted are too easy for my kids. I just have to figure out what to focus on and how to present it. But thank you, those links helped me get some ideas.
     
  16. franny

    franny Rookie

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    Thank you Trinda!
     
  17. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Jun 21, 2008

    Franny, what types of IEP goals, state objectives, pre-academic skills, etc. are you trying to work on with your kids? My kids work at their independent work stations for up to 30 minutes independently and it's amazing. I worked them upwards from five minutes all the way to thirty minutes by gradually increasing their work periods. It's very helpful so we can focus on the 1:1 instruction of IEP goals with the other rotation of students, AND the kiddos are reinforcing previously learned skills from their IEP or our thematic units daily!

    Let me know what types of things you are working on - and I can recommend some independent tasks. It sounds like your kids might be in the functioning range of my moderate/severe classroom - where they can do more than put in, take out, stack, etc. I can share some of my task ideas with you. Sounds like they could probably even do file folder tasks - you should get a Carson Dellosa book of file folder tasks. I have one on the first grade level and it's great with all subjects!
     
  18. franny

    franny Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2008

    Well my kids are all over the place so I will try to consolidate as much as possible. In Reading, I have some who are working on identifying letter names and sounds, some who are working on sight word reading (Edmark), some who are learning word families, some who are working on reading fluency, and some on comprehension (fluent readers who don't know anything about what they just read).

    In math I have some who are learning to recognize numbers, count and identify quantity up to 10, some to 20. I have some who are working on Touch Math addition and subtraction, some are doing single digit, some double digit. Some are working on identifying coins by name and value. I have one kiddo doing Saxon Math at the grade 2 level so he works on fractions, telling time, reading a thermometer, money skills, graphing, ordinal numbers, etc.I have tried to do some Saxon at the lower levels for my other kids but it gets too hard too fast.

    In writing I have some who are learning to write their first and last name, some are learning to write/spell word family words and sight words, some who are learning how to write a sentence. Some are just learning to write a letter when given the sound or name of that letter.

    Those are just my goals, of course thay all also have fine motor and speech goals as well.

    Thanks for offering to help!
     
  19. franny

    franny Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2008

    Inhisgrip, I am so sorry that I've used your thread to ask about so many other things! To make up for it I will post my schedule but it's not nearly as full as yours so probably not that helpful. Anyway here goes.

    Arrival
    Choice time /morning jobs/bathroom
    Morning circle- calendar/weather
    Snack- social skills
    recess with K-2
    Math- all students break into small groups with me and my paras
    except for a few who do choice time until it is their turn for
    math.
    Lunch/recess with K-2
    Choice time (while I take my lunch break my paras are alone with the
    kids)
    Reading/Writing- again, all students break into small groups with me
    and my paras except for a few who do choice time
    until it is their turn.
    recess with K-2
    Group games, art, or cooking
    afternoon circle- songs
    home

    Choice time activities include computer, book corner, writer's workshop, puzzles, games, dramatic play area, stringing beads, geoboards, and dolls.
     
  20. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Jun 21, 2008

    READING
    Sight reading:
    -index cards that have pictures paired with words; lower functioning students match two like cards, middle functioning students match a word/picture card with a word card, higher functioning students match a word card with a picture card. Cards can be placed in a basket all shuffled up - student's task is to paper clip them, clothes pin them, or put them in library card pockets in a book (let me know if you need clarification).
    - Handmade story books with picture cues to help with words; lower functioning students velcro a card with a sight word on top of a greyed out sight word, higher functioning students have to fill in the blank with the appropriate word (velcro cards) -- visual cues can be used to help in this process.

    Word Families:
    -matching books; again, lower functioning students can use cards that match to pictures with greyed out words, eventually you can fade out the grey.. higher functioning students match cards to pictures. For example, a page with a picture of a hat may say _ a t and the student has to choose the correct letter. To simplify - you could put two choices on the top (velcro) -- B or H ? They have to choose the right letter. You can also make it errorless where they just have to take the H from the top of the page and place it in front of the _ a t to spell the word correctly. There are tons of ways to do this!
    -word family book; have the words listed on the page, have pictures that the student has to match to the words. Another variation is to have four to five words from a word family, let's say, -ot, and then the child has to write in the correct beginning letter. Or trace the beginning letter. Or choose between two or three choices. OR again you can make it errorless for the lower functioning, then you can move up to two choices, three choices, etc.

    Comprehension:
    -For simple comprehension activities, I write sentence strips that say simple things. Such as "The boy is sleeping." Then there is a basket of picture cards and they have to match the picture. Surprisingly enough, VISUAL learning is so important - and it seems so simple - but choosing the right card is showing that they are comprehending what is read to them. To make an activity like this one errorless, you can have two sets of cards. Your first set would be several sentence strips with the sentences.
    The boy is happy.
    The girl is working.
    The baby is crying.
    The dog is barking.
    At the end of each sentence may be a colored square (each one a different color). One set of "answer picture cards" could be outlined in the corresponding color. Once you think the child "masters" matching the colors (they are secretly taking in the reading while they are matching the colors) -- you then switch out the color answer cards and give them just plain answer cards (no colored border) -- this is a good progression for comprehension, sight words, etc. I do this color coding with a lot of my grade level vocabulary! The kids match cards to science and social studies vocabulary words and pictures, they start out color coded and then they get so used to which cards go where, they move to the no color coding and are successful!

    MATH
    Recognizing Numbers:
    -simple puzzles that you can get from the dollar store, tj maxx, marshalls, etc. where they are putting numbers in a wooden puzzle, foam puzzle, etc.
    -counting activity may be several butter containers glued to a box. You can vary this activity by not writing the numbers outside of the container, rather putting a popsicle stick hot glued on the side of the butter cups (vertical, so the stick is popping out of the cup) then place a piece of velcro on the top of the stick. You can have a basket of counters (bears, erasers, pen tops, laminated sheets of colored paper, etc.) and then you can switch out the activity for numbers 1-10, 1-20, etc. You place the velcro card (7) on the butter cups (you can do 3,5,6 however many you think the child can span their attention for...) and then it may have butter cups with the numbers 4, 7, 9, and 1 on them. The child would then have exactly 4+7+9+1 counters in their basket. I might not be explaining this well, but the child can look at the task and see that they are supposed to put the specified number of counters in the cups. Also, you can vary this for higher level thinkers by putting a blue 5 on the cup and a green 6 on the cup, meaning the child has to choose 5 blue bears for that cup, or 6 green bears for the other cup, so on and so forth.
    -TouchMath activities could be a little sentence strip book, or file folder book, with different pages. you can write the problems on the pages, and the child has to choose the touchmath answer card to velcro in to the book. You can make these errorless for those just learning, where they have to match the number to the correct answer that is already listed there. Or, each page could have the answer velcroed in a different spot and the child has to move it to the square where the answer should be. Errorless activities are so KEY to exposure for kids who may not ever be able to be independent. So even if you have a kid that's not quite to Touchmath yet, they may be exposed to the addition concept by having an errorless book.
    -Coins: I always do sorting activities. I save TV dinner trays and tape pictures of the coins on the inside. Sometimes higher kids have just the coin names taped on the inside. They have to sort the coins. This is a good skill for math and also a good vocatonal skill.
    -Coin Book - I make little books with ACTUAL coins because this is helpful for kids to feel and see actual coins. Sometimes those fake-o coins work but then the kid doesn't have a clue when they touch real money... I will do variations of the book based on what the child's IEP goal is... sometimes each page says one coin, PENNY, NICKEL, DIME, QUARTER, DOLLAR, and then I have the child velcro the coin onto the right page. You can ALSO AGAIN make this errorless by keeping each correct answer velcroed on the top of the page and they have to "move" it to the "answer" square (rather than placing all of the choices into a basket, where a higher child could choose each correct answer from the basket and place it on the page.)
    -Fractions - Similar to what I've been talking about - some sort of book that has different fractions in it and the child has to velcro the correct answer for what that fraction is. You can make this one interchangeable as well, by maybe laminating it and coloring the fractions differently each time, or by making it an option to velcro your card to the top of the page and the answer is on the bottom of the page, and you can change the order, answers, etc. as the child makes progress or masters the first skills. If that makes sense.

    By the way, I HATE saxon. I never thought Saxon was designed with special ed kids in mind. The pages are hideous, there's so much text, the lessons move too quickly, ick. Haha, off topic.


    WRITING
    Handwriting:
    - www.handwritingworksheets.com --- get a cheapy clipboard and put a velcro piece on the top where you can velcro a pencil. One of the activities can be to do the activity on the clipboard - this can work with many different things. you can print out handwriting worksheets with the child's name on it - these are GREAT for data collection, portfolios, etc. I keep my students worksheets, especially for kids who have a simple, clear cut goal of writing their name. That way, I can show the progression from September to January, etc. by keeping these worksheets that they do from time to time.
    - you can make velcro activities in boardmaker - put a picture of something simple, and they have to velcro the right letter (c for cat, d for dog, basic stuff) -- you can again make these errorless by putting a greyed out answer already there for them to match, or for them to move the piece from the top of the page to the "answer box" and then slowly move them towards two choices for that page, then all of the choices are in a baggie or basket and they have to pick it from all of the choices (usually 5-7, depending on child's ability).
    - puzzles with alphabet letters - these are reinforcing letters, sounds, etc. these are great for independent activities. I'm assuming you have an elementary classroom - because you do want to be sure your activities are age appropriate. puzzles etc. may not be appropriate for an older level classroom.
    - writing also includes fine motor skills, putting pegs in a pegboard, putting items into a container, sorting, unclipping clothes pins from the side of a box and placing them in the box, another good fine motor one is getting a bunch of key cards (old ones) from a local hotel/motel, making a larger hole and having the child put the cards from one side into the other side, then slowly changing it and ending up with just a horizontal line, about a millimeter thick, and they have to get the hotel cards in the slot.
    - writing can also be computer/keyboard activities. there are quite a few typing / learning games for higher kids, and then switch activated games for lower kids. I know that there are several pieces of writing software that are for VERY low functioning kids - and work up to the higher functioning kids by allowing them to write with symbols and pictures. A computer assignment, once the child learns what is expected of them, can also be a good independent activity.

    SENSORY/OT
    -moving jelly bugs (or something else squishy or silly feeling) from one jar to another (something the child might enjoy doing, but is getting sensory input from)
    -filling up squirt bottles (also could be vocational, but is water play) -- I have a station by our sink in the classroom where I put electrical tape at different capacities on several spray bottles (that I got at Costco) and it SAYS the capacity on the tape, so the child is also being exposed to following directions, looking at capacities, numbers, etc. This can also be transferred into using the squirt bottle to water different plants in the school or classroom
    -a tub of rice or sand with hidden toys in it, little cheapy dollar store toys, with a bucket attached to the side for the child to place them all in. You can also step this up a bit by having three buckets, the child has to do small toys, medium toys, big toys. Or red toys, blue toys, green toys. Or even throw in some math - 3 little soldiers in this cup, 8 little soldiers in this cup, 5 little soldiers in this cup.
    - pouring activity - similar to the squirt bottles - but the child is given several containers with lines (and capacities written on the lines for exposure) and a jug or bottle with water (or sand or rice or whatever you think) -- this one can get messy so I only use it with my higher / responsible kiddos
    - clothes pins - putting them on sentence strips, baskets, etc.
    - matching sensory / tactile items. I sometimes get paint samples from the store and will do tactile patterns on them with puffy paint - the child has to match one card to the other. Lower kids can look, higher kids can learn to shut their eyes and have to find the match by feeling...


    Hopefully some of these will be helpful.... this was just what first came to my mind for your IEP goals....
     
  21. inhisgrip20

    inhisgrip20 Comrade

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    Jun 21, 2008

    Hey Franny, no problem... I don't mind being hijacked. It's all great ideas and I love discussing ideas of any sort. :)

    Teachersk - Thanks for sharing so many ideas. Many are too high for my kiddos but I love the sensory/OT ideas. :)
     

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