School supply shopping

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Aces, Jul 29, 2018.

  1. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,208
    Likes Received:
    1,136

    Aug 2, 2018

    You're an adult. Other adults asked you how much you paid for particular items. As an adult, you could have chosen to either respond to their question or say that you'd rather not disclose that info. Additionally, kids are curious, so that's probably why your high school students asked what you paid for (insert item).

    The poster, on the other hand, asked children how much they paid for particular items. He's the adult in charge; therefore, he should know what is/isn't an appropriate question to ask a kid. Frankly, though, it's none of his business. Plus, most kids have no clue what their parents paid for a particular item.

    Do you see the difference?
     
  2. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1,014

    Aug 2, 2018

    Did I say I know *all* poor people?

    Yay, another military brat! <high fives>

    I am the first person in my family to ever go to college and have “wealth”. Everyone else in my family struggles to make ends meet and does nothing to better themselves or their situations. They are all in the working class and very rarly make above minimum wage.
     
  3. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1,014

    Aug 2, 2018

    I agree it’s none of his business and the students may or may not know the price. That’s fair, but I don’t think he meant it to be rude or offensive. What if he was genuinely curious because he wanted to buy the item for himself? I’ve had students ask me where I bought a shirt, for example, and it’s price because they wanted one. Wouldn’t that be appropriate in that context? Just like I’ve asked students where they bought things and for how much because I was contemplating purchasing the good.
     
  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1,014

    Aug 2, 2018

    I think it would be inappropriate if the student had tattered clothes or they looked inexpensive, then that would be unacceptable. But, if they were wearing name-brand clothes for instance, I *might* inquire how much and gasp at the price just for casual conversation purposes and have a laugh with the student after I commented how I could never afford such a thing on my teaching salary!
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,208
    Likes Received:
    1,136

    Aug 2, 2018

    It's highly unlikely that he was asking because he wanted to purchase the clothes for himself. He has said in several other posts that he solely shops at consignment stores for his clothing. Plus, he said that he knew that his "routine questioning" is politically incorrect.
     
    bella84, a2z and RaiderFan87 like this.
  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1,014

    Aug 2, 2018

    Oh, I didn’t read that.
     
  7. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    1,180

    Aug 2, 2018

    .
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2019
  8. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

    Joined:
    May 5, 2009
    Messages:
    866
    Likes Received:
    182

    Aug 2, 2018

    Wow. We moved from "I just saved money at Wal-Mart and I hope you can too" over to the "poor should pay, rich should pay, school should pay, government should pay, you don't get it at all" conversation.
    Thanks for the tip on the savings. :) Thanks for the reminder that we can all have different views. No matter how you feel, the fact remains that more is needed and often teachers supply it. Right or wrong, I will always keep spare supplies for those who forget their own and for those who run out during the day, and for those whose parents can't/won't supply things for their students.
    I grew up in an upper middle income home, and I recall my parents buying school supplies every year. I don't know if there was a list or if they just loved Crayola products. I live in a regular area (meaning there are lower, middle and upper income homes across the region) that does tend toward making the list of median homes that are higher in price. We have Title I schools, charter schools, and private schools. We are multi-cultural. My area puts out a myriad of supply lists that you can find in the front of every box store and Staples. People arrive in droves and buy out the supplies. People also are encouraged to donate to causes filling up back packs for kids in need. I never recall the school supplying every consumable item. As to paper towels, ziplocks, wipes and other housekeeping consumables, I feel those should be abundant and found in the school's supply closet. No matter who purchases, I do think students need to be taught/reminded that we are to be good stewards of our supplies. I think we need to model that.
    Also, this weekend Staples has their teacher gifts.
     
    bella84 and Aces like this.
  9. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,208
    Likes Received:
    1,136

    Aug 2, 2018

    Go to page 2 of this thread.
     
  10. Aces

    Aces Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2018
    Messages:
    820
    Likes Received:
    429

    Aug 2, 2018

    I have to agree here my school is a regional high school and ewe get students from all over. To be honest I spent close to $700 last year in fabrics and things for the theater department. Out of my own pocket that I didn't and probably won't get reimbursed for. We have a wonderful theater guild if I do say so myself, but it's not because the school focuses too much attention on it.
     
  11. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1,014

    Aug 2, 2018

    I will admit. I kind of derailed this thread...

    Another concern of mine is that this will negatively impact the funding of various school districts. I know some public schoolteachers who pay several hundred dollars for students per year for school supplies because their parents refuse to buy them any. What are teachers and school districts going to do now? Where does Governor Brown think the money is going to magically come from? This is going to add millions and millions of additional costs that I feel are unnecessary. Sure, provide Chromebooks and expensive graphing calculators and rulers for activities, but foot the bill for *everything*? That just isn’t tenable.
     
  12. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,776
    Likes Received:
    522

    Aug 2, 2018

    No, I would still find it inappropriate. When I was speaking about the expensive basketball shoes, my students were showing me the website and were telling me how much the shoes cost. I did not ask and I wouldn't feel comfortable asking.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2018
    YoungTeacherGuy likes this.
  13. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,776
    Likes Received:
    522

    Aug 2, 2018

    I agree 100% with this post. At the beginning of the year, my school gave kids pencil cases, folders and notebooks. Some kids took good care of these supplies while the majority lost them within a week. :( It's a difficult situation and I'm not sure how to have students buy in to their education.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2018
  14. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,765
    Likes Received:
    1,014

    Aug 2, 2018

    That’s okay for you to not feel appropriate doing that and that’s your right. There’s nothing wrong with that. I, myself, have no qualms asking a student if I know them well enough and they are middle class and above. That’s just my personal feeling on that.
     
  15. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,485
    Likes Received:
    1,019

    Aug 2, 2018

    What are you using to determine if your students are middle class or above?
     
    Ms.Holyoke likes this.

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. MissCeliaB,
  2. futuremathsprof
Total: 631 (members: 2, guests: 602, robots: 27)
test