School supply shopping

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Aces, Jul 29, 2018.

  1. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Aug 2, 2018

    Thank you so much for pulling those up.

    One of my core tenants as an educator is the idea of empathy. I don't assume a student who comes in not having done their homework (but also having no after school activities) necessarily chose not to do it because they were lazy. Similarly, I don't assume a student who has a cell phone or a nice shirt but doesn't come in with every single supply the first day necessarily has parents who are just trying to work the system.

    Are there some out there who do? I wouldn't be surprised. But I think that's the case for any kind of system. (Look at: Costco return policy, taxes!, etc...)

    Empathy, in part, means to understand what others are feeling and going through. To understand the whole situation. I won't begrudge a kid or family for something when I don't have that whole picture. And really, I think that's why I have so many positive relationships with families, in which sometimes previous teachers didn't: they immediately jumped into assumptions, instead of seeking to understand. Seeking to find a common ground. Being open to ideas that might not actually match one's own.
     
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  2. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Aug 2, 2018

    Ditto.
     
  3. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I grew up poor and almost entirely around poor people, so I know exactly how poor families manage.

    It mathematically does it make sense that items that cost close to $0 are unaffordable, even for people making minimum wage. I’m not going to accept that and I’m not going to accept a ridiculous argument that is tantamount to, “Why not?”
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    The bottom line is that many families don't provide school supplies for their kids. Can't, won't, it doesn't matter. The end result is the same: kids don't have school supplies.

    Now, I've mentioned here before and in real life how frustrating it is to see free supplies wasted by students. My school gives out school supplies during the first days of school, and many of those supplies end up broken and on the floor within moments of their receipt. It's such a waste and I hate seeing it. To me this wastefulness signals that students don't value education. That's the bottom line there, and that's the part we need to change.
     
  5. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    I've always seen this more as a Maslov's hierarchy kind of thing (not exactly...but my best way of explaining it): there's so much else going on in some of their lives, that school, and a silly little pencil, just don't have as much meaning. Part of why I try to make sure, especially for those kids with the more difficult home lives, that school is a place where they feel comforted, happy, enjoying their learning, etc... -- seeing the true value while doing so in such a way that it honors where they're at right now (not saying others don't, by any means, just in case anyone thinks I am!)
     
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  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    This. I agree with this!

    My private school collects all of the unused school supplies at the end of the year and saves them for the 40% of students who attend on financial assistance. The idea is that the parents are already paying tuition, so they’ve already contributed to their educations.
     
  7. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Aug 2, 2018

    I could not agree more with this statement!

    One poster commented that he asked students how much they paid for their clothes. I find that so incredibly insensitive and inappropriate.
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    You grew up around poor people whose families worked in a severely regimented environment - the military - where certain choices would have negative ramifications on your parent's job.
     
  9. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Are public schools not regimented?
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I actually think we have a very similar opinion on this topic.
     
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  11. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Again, you don't address my comment and deflect.
     
  12. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    No, I heard you. You just refuse to acknowledge my counterpoint and “counter” with “deflection!”
     
  13. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    And wouldn’t incarceration or public intoxication or spousal abuse or <insert other nefarious thing if caught> have negative ramifications on someone’s job, regardless if they grew up in a military family or not?
     
  14. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Although I’ve not done this, but why is that inappropriate? People ask other people all the time how much things they’ve bought costs. For instance, I bought a $27,000 Honda Civic last year in June. Many of my students asked me how much it cost, as did some of my coworkers, as did my friends. I also had a student comment on how expensive my shoes looked even though I bought them on sale for $30. Why is that offensive?

    This is something that is commonplace in our society.
     
  15. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Your comment - I know all poor people because I grew up poor.

    My comment - your military family situation is unlike many other poor families because the military has very strong consequences for bad money management and other negative life choices that are beyond what many jobs will keep track of. Military family - ya' know. ;)

    Your comment - about public schools - deflection - then don't other jobs care about extreme crimes?

    You are really reaching to put yourself in the shoes of generational poverty. I can guarantee while you were poor and maybe very poor, your experience is nothing the same.
     
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