School board seeks to own student, teacher created materials

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Mrs. H2O, Feb 7, 2013.

  1. Mrs. H2O

    Mrs. H2O Rookie

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    Feb 7, 2013

    From the Washington Post:

    What do you think of this proposal?

    I know that if you are an employee of a company, anything you create as part of doing your job for that company is considered their property.

    However, this has never been the case in education. Should it be? (Personally, I'm not a fan. It seems as if the school board is trying to get a bigger piece of the pie, so to speak...)
     
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  3. chebrutta

    chebrutta Fanatic

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    Not a fan. First, I've already had trouble with my lessons being used in lower grades. Second, what about the kid who enters an art or writing contest ands wins a cast prize? Does the school district get the money?
     
  4. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    The difference between the company owning the rights and a school district owning them is that when you work for a company you are doing tasks to benefit them. In education; it is about doing tasks to benefit the students (or so we say). And the student work, they are not "owned" or employed by a school, this should have no merit.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Unknown in K-12, maybe, but increasingly standard in universities: I know of at least one system whose contract with adjuncts specifies that the rights to all works created while one teaches a course belong to the university.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I think it stifles creativity.:2cents:
     
  7. JustMe

    JustMe Guru

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    :tired:

    So stupid.
     
  8. Mrs. H2O

    Mrs. H2O Rookie

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    This is exactly what I was thinking.
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    frstrtdteacher, what do you intend by this?
     
  10. JustMe

    JustMe Guru

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    From the article: "Board Chair Verjeana M. Jacobs (District 5) said she and Vice Chair Carolyn M. Boston (District 6) attended an Apple presentation and learned how teachers can use apps to create new curricula. The proposal was designed to make it clear who owns teacher-developed curricula created while using apps on iPads that are school property, Jacobs said."

    When a district is spending time trying to collect on things I designed for my classroom and students using their precious iPad, well, it's time I look elswhere. That's just absurd.
     
  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    If this happened in my district, I just wouldn't create anything for my students. We'd only use materials that were created by the textbook company. Sad, probably not what's best for students, but necessary.
     
  12. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    I couldn't agree more. If I lost the rights to distribute my work as I choose then I would stop creating new lessons. If I stopped creating new lessons I'd quit my job.
     
  13. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    What do I think? WHAT DO I THINK??? I think it is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard! God, what is the world coming to?
     
  14. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Aficionado

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    Feb 8, 2013

    I create a lot of materials at home on my own time so I definitely do not agree with this.
     
  15. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Phenom

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    Or you could say "Oh, I created this on the side for my brother-in-law. Not for the school. Just happened to bring it in today..." :whistle:
     
  16. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Fanatic

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    If they REALLY want to own all of my lesson materials, they can come to my classroom, go through ALLLLL my files and make a copy every darned thing on their own time. Meanwhile I'll be sure to have backup electronic copies at home.
     
  17. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    I once went to a "training" offered by my district. The presenter had us choose different standards from the common core standards and write lesson plans for them. I'm thinking, okay, we'll write them up and then we'll get feedback and/or discuss how to improve from there. As the day went on, things just seemed... off. I finally figured out that he was going to collect our work, put it together, and publish it as a resource for other teachers! All without telling us! Needless to say, my motivation and effort stopped at that point.

    I think I would've given some effort if a) he had told us this up front and b) he would include our names as contributors.
     
  18. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    That's not appropriate, Rox. I hope you ratted him out to whoever at the district engages presenters.
     
  19. TeachTN

    TeachTN Comrade

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    Think of the websites that exist where teachers can share their materials with other teachers, some for free, some for a price. As a new teacher, I have enjoyed using these sites for ideas or to outright grab the material to use. Some teachers are doing quite well with selling their materials; this would end if the districts own the materials.

    I agree, this would definitely hurt creativity, there is no motivation to create materials if they just go somewhere else.
     
  20. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Could they even do that if it isn't in their contract?

    As for student work, they are not employees, so the district should have no ownership.

    I'm also on the fence of the legality of some of it. Technically, we are salary. But, if the materials are created at home, outside of contract hours, could they legally 'own' them?

    Obviously not a fan! Well, unless I get a pay raise for my efforts!
     
  21. HeartDrama

    HeartDrama Connoisseur

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    Feb 9, 2013

    Would this mean that teachers can't use lesson plans they created if they were to change schools or districts?
     

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