Running Records

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Roobunny, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. Roobunny

    Roobunny Comrade

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    Nov 23, 2012

    Don't think poorly of me, but I have yet to do a running record on any of my students. I guess I didn't realize I was supposed to be doing them until I was in a training on Tuesday.

    We did IRIs at the beginning of the school year, which we received no training on how to do them - just the bare bones (i.e. have students read the sight words to determine what passage they read, then as they read the passage time them for 1 minute to determine fluency. Do a wpm count, then ask them comprehension questions related to the passage).

    I feel like such a horrible teacher, but honestly I've been given no training on how to do anything. I feel like every time I think I am "getting it" I am thrown another into another downward spiral.

    Running records look awfully complicated. Furthermore, the training I went to delved into meaning miscues, semantic (I think??) miscues, and visual miscues. :dizzy:

    I guess my question is: How do I find the time to administer a running record? I do not have an aide and the only time I would be able to do anything like this would be during literacy workstations, but that would mean giving up small groups in order to do RRs. HELP!
     
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  3. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Fanatic

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    Nov 23, 2012

    Running records do take away from literacy instruction, but they provide so much helpful information to guide your instruction. It's a bit of a catch 22. See if you can do a shorter small group session and then do 1-2 running records on your students while they finish up their workstations. Also, if your students do silent reading that's a great time. I manage to do them on my grade 1s regularly, but I do have to sacrifice some instruction time to do it.
     
  4. Roobunny

    Roobunny Comrade

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    Nov 23, 2012

    How often do you do RRs? I could do half of my students during silent reading (We have a scheduled DEAR time every day), however this time is only with our homeroom class so I would have to figure out how to work in my non-homeroomies.

    My small group instruction is only 15 minutes, so I am not sure how I can cut that back any further...

    What do you use for your RR template? I am very daunted by the whole thing...it makes me a bit anxious - all those symbols and brackets and now the MSV thing we learned on Tuesday...:unsure:
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Phenom

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    Nov 24, 2012

    I don't do running records. We have to do DIBELS every 2 weeks. For me, that is plenty of data. I know where my students are reading just by what they are showing me in reading group anyway- how fluent they are, what type of cues they are using, etc. Personally, I feel that we spend so much instructional time testing...I wouldn't add in anymore unless I was specifically required to, or if I wanted to see something specific for one student for some reason.

    Is someone telling you that you have to do them for every student, or just showing you how to do them as a tool? Unless you're required to turn something in for each student, I would just choose a few students that you're concerned about and just start with RR's for them. As for a template, I'd go with whatever they used in your training.
     
  6. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 24, 2012

    So, a few general thoughts and a few more specific ones. First, there may be a larger issue, which is your preparation to teach reading. Typically, part of being trained on how to teach reading includes an assessment component, which would include a reading inventory, running record, or error/miscue analysis with DIBELS or similar - basically, a chance to examine multiple components of the child's reading behavior. I guess I'm wondering if you are just unfamiliar with the IRI specifically, or with reading assessment more broadly, or even more broadly with reading instruction as a whole? The reason I ask is that if you are struggling with the whole package, you may want to consider some more in-depth training such as taking more coursework, doing some pretty hefty reading, or seeking out an in-depth PD course. If you're just confused with the running records, that is a much more specific problem - still has a lot of moving parts and will probably require more than reading a few posts on AtoZ, but more management than not having a handle on the whole process.

    More specifically in terms of your time question, it seems like you've got some ideas. The main idea is to find independent work for the rest of the kids to do (whether that be centers, independent seatwork, etc.) while you work individually with each child. Sounds like I'm just repeated what others have said in this area.

    In terms of frequency, there is a difference between a more involved reading inventory, running record, or thorough error/miscue analysis and just collecting some updated ORF (oral reading fluency) data via DIBELS. In terms of the full package, I'd do it once at the beginning of the year, and then as needed after that (e.g., if you don't know what a child is struggling with, if your instruction isn't working). However, as waterfall mentioned, your informal observations of each child's reading skills during small group time will give you enough information from session to session as to the child's growth with specific reading skills.
     
  7. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Nov 24, 2012

    We use running records monthly with most students and weekly or biweekly with our struggling readers (not daily). Using your silent reading time is a great time to work on running records. Anyway to switch classes with your team teacher for this time once or twice a week?

    Do your students read in your small groups? If so, you can take a running record as they are reading. Just note what mistakes they are making and how they are correcting mistakes.

    You can use a variety of things for a template. I often use a copy of the text I will have a student read. Then I can just mark on the text. You could also just write on a blank piece of paper (mark down each mistake that they make and what the actual word is).
     
  8. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Nov 24, 2012

    We have about one a month for each child. I can do a few during reading workshop, but I don't do them every day during reading workshop, I try to focus on conferences and listening in at that time. What I do is listen in on one child's reading while the kids all read the book at the same time during guided reading. With some groups I have one student come over and do a running record, then call the rest of the group for a lesson. With my highest readers (I usually have a few male or to early second grade levels) I only listen in for part of a book, around 100 words. I use the template from Marie Clay's observation survey, but there are lots on the Internet.
     
  9. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Fanatic

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    Nov 24, 2012

    I use a running record kit - PM Benchmarks, which comes with levelled texts that I use to assess.

    If you don't have a kit, Marie Clay has a blank running record form you could use with any text.

    Worst case scenario, get a blank piece of paper.
     
  10. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Nov 24, 2012

    I teach pre-first, and e actually don't start running records until January. Once you get started doing it, it will make more sense. The data from running records is very helpful, and it allows you to visually see the progress the kids are making, which is nice.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 24, 2012

  12. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Nov 24, 2012

    I did 3 (exactly 3) running records during my certification training. My district doesn't "do" running records, although I have begged for 5 years now for the materials with which to do them for my class. Instead of running records, we do DIBELS benchmarking, and biweekly progress monitoring for any students who do not score at or above benchmark (I do it about every 4-6 weeks for those who did benchmark). In addition, my kiddos read sight words orally to me each week, and are tested on comprehension. I know it's not the same as comprehension concurrently with oral reading, but its better than nothing. We do oral reading/comprehension activities at my teacher table, at least with my medium & upper groups. My lowest group is too busy working on decoding, nwf, and struggling through phrases and sentences.
     
  13. Roobunny

    Roobunny Comrade

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    Nov 24, 2012

    EdEd,

    I will be the first to admit that sometimes I feel like I am groping blindly in the dark. As a first year teacher, I know I have a LOT to learn. I did a lot of reading over the summer, but it was hard to know exactly what to focus on since I had no idea what to expect. The majority of the reading I did was on literacy workstations, which wasn't something I should have spent so much time on.

    I think I was under the impression that I would receive more training before being thrown into the classroom, which didn't happen. I didn't even receive my reading and writing resource books until 9 weeks into the school year and by that time I had no spare time to read through them...needless to say it's been a tough year thus far.

    I created another post on her about how I don't feel like I am growing as a teacher and how frustrating it is to experience that feeling. I know I need more in-depth training across the board, but I feel like there is not enough time for me to get that training until summer.
     
  14. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Nov 24, 2012

    In reading, we are required to do AIMSWEB monthly on tier 1 students, and weekly on tier 2 & 3. It's actually quite easy. I do them during a round or two of Daily 5. We have to do them on Wednesdays...not sure why except maybe everyone knows that's it's test day.

    In math, all students monthly on the 15th.
     
  15. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Nov 24, 2012

    Deep breaths! :hugs: Reading is super complicated. I don't feel like I had even a surface understanding of it until this year (my 2nd year). I am really excited to do some more reading over the summer and really assess those student errors correctly. I'm even thinking of going back to school and getting my reading endorsement.

    I use the Fountas & Pinnell BAS kit to assess reading levels, but others have mentioned blank templates here that you can use with any book. You don't HAVE to use all those symbols either. I usually just put a dot over words read correctly and circle the ones they miss and record if they did a substitution or just needed help sounding it out. You can go back and analyze later. Find what works for you.

    Also, they still take me forever. :blush: I have 12 kids and it took me weeks to finish haha. But I am a tiny bit faster than last year! My mentor did our whole second grade class in a week. She was really intuitive and fast.
     
  16. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 24, 2012

    Well, the most important thing is that you realize that and you are willing to learn. As you can see from a variety of other people, you're not the only one to go into teaching feeling unprepared in some areas. To me, the singular difference between great teachers who start unprepared and those who start unprepared but are chronically ineffective is an attitude of continuous improvement - realizing that, no matter how many years in you are, there are still things to learn and improve on. It seems like you already have this attitude, so I'm sure you'll do fine.

    So, it sounds like you've gotten some decent info about conducting ORF/running records. What other areas do you think you need help with? Anything we can help with?
     
  17. Roobunny

    Roobunny Comrade

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    Nov 24, 2012

    FourSquare - I am so glad I'm not alone. Reading is super complicated... more so than I ever thought it would be.

    EdEd - I truly want to improve, but it's frustrating because I want it to happen NOW! I know these things come with time and experience and that's what I have to keep telling myself.

    One thing I think I am pretty good at is classroom management...or I could just have a great class, who knows? I also feel very natural in the classroom. I never feel like I don't belong there, although there are some days when I wish I wasn't there ;)

    Another area that I am really struggling with is how to fit everything into my day. My schedule is awful! I have 2 hours to teach my first kiddos spelling, grammar, reading with workstations and small groups, and writing. How is that even possible?? Sometimes I feel like my kids don't get any grammar instruction or we totally blow off spelling rules just so I can get to reading and writing. Sometimes we don't get to reading and/or writing because I've spent the majority of the morning on an anchor lesson dealing with parts of speech. It got to a point where every week I was adjusting my schedule trying to figure out a way to work things in, but I never came to a solid solution.

    Furthermore, on Wednesday afternoons my homeroom kids have a little over an hour for ELAR. And don't get me started on Friday afternoons. My homeroom kids have specials ALL afternoon. They have one 45 minute block of ELAR, which includes the spelling test. So Fridays I usually just give the test, then we do a read-aloud for the pure enjoyment of a good story. We really don't have time for much else.

    Any suggestions on some good books to read on reading instruction? I've read Debbie Diller's Literacy Workstations and have Making the Most of Small Groups. I've also seen others suggest her book Reading with Meaning. I've also read Strategies that Work, but I read it so long ago, I need to revisit the book. Coincidentally enough, when I finally received the reading resource books it just so happened to be the Primary Comprehension Toolkit.

    What about Writing Instruction? DrivingPigeon had suggested a book to use called Getting to the Core of Writing, which is full of lessons. I pull lessons from this book a lot since we had no writing resource books for 9 weeks. We now have Lucy Caulkins, but I've had no time to look through it....

    Also, while I am asking about good books - maybe someone can suggest a good read or some good strategies to incorporate spelling and grammar rules into the curriculum so I don't wind up spending so much time covering these things...

    Thanks!
     
  18. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 24, 2012

    Welcome to education :). Yeah, there can be a lot to cram in! In terms of books on reading, you'll probably get a lot of recommendations to get into the Daily 5 - seems to be a favorite in terms of both reading instruction and management/organization of that instruction.

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Daily-Fiv...e=UTF8&qid=1353802323&sr=1-1&keywords=daily+5

    I would also suggest a book on reading research/strategies more broadly, as opposed to just reading a particular curriculum, as I think it's important to have a foundational understanding of why particular curricula use things they do. It will also help you become a more critical consumer of curricula, and give you the ability to modify curricula if necessary (since you'll know the nuts and bolts of it). Here are a couple of good titles:

    http://www.amazon.com/Direct-Instru...1-catcorr&keywords=direct+instruction+reading

    http://www.amazon.com/Teaching-Stru...2-catcorr&keywords=direct+instruction+reading

    Finally, I'd also suggest getting your hands on a teacher's manual for a reading intervention program so you can see very practical implementations of how to help struggling readers in small groups. A quick trick is just to look at some sample lessons usually available online, and to look at their scope & sequence. So, take a look at sample lessons with SPIRE by EPS for example:

    http://eps.schoolspecialty.com/products/details.cfm?seriesonly=3250AM

    Then, by looking at their scope & sequence, you can get a sense of how that curriculum is structured over the course of instruction.

    I think it's important to emphasize that, in your small reading groups, it's important to do more than just guided reading, if by guided reading someone is referring to reading a book as a small group and processing that text. It's important to explicitly teach, based on student need, phonics, phonemic awareness, comprehension strategies, etc. Carefully look at any small group reading guide and make sure there is a direct instruction component to the program, assuming again you're working with struggling or beginning readers.
     
  19. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Nov 25, 2012

    We have a "Sneak Peak" in August before school starts, where students have a 30-minute time block to meet their teacher and do running records. We have to report running record scores via an online program (Inform) by October 1st, February 1st, and June 1st.

    Since it has been 3 months since I last did formal running records, I am taking time off from guided reading groups this week to do running records. This will take place during my normal Daily 5 time.
     
  20. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Nov 25, 2012

    This entire post just makes me want to crawl into bed and die! :dizzy: There's so much I don't know. Anyway, back to professionally developing myself. :crosseyed I am slowly trying to tackle Fountas & Pinnell's "When Readers Struggle..."
     
  21. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 25, 2012

    There will always be stuff you don't know, but it will certainly get better! One day you'll wake up and realize how much you've learned, and I bet you that day will come sooner than you think :)
     

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