Rules and Discipline

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by jennstarr12, Aug 11, 2008.

  1. jennstarr12

    jennstarr12 Companion

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    Aug 11, 2008

    I am trying to come up with a set plan for classroom rules and discipline. This will be my first year teaching K although I did do my student teaching in a K class last fall.

    We had 4 rules which basically were no running in school, keep hands/feet to yourself, no yelling and be nice to others. they weren't worded exactly like that =) and for discipline my co-op teacher used sad faces on the board next to their names and for each sad face the child had to sit out for 5 minutes of playtime. i dont really like this idea and was thinking of using a chart with colored cards like the green, yellow, red instead.

    so anyway, I would love to hear what classroom rules you establish with K and what your discipine plan is. Thanks!!
     
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  3. kidsalot

    kidsalot Comrade

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    Aug 11, 2008

    During the first week of school I have the children (with guidance) come up with our classroom rules. We first discuss why we need rules(to be safe, to learn....) Typically they are:
    Kind words
    Kind hands
    Safe feet
    Listening ears
    Have fun and learn
    I make up a poster board with the rules and pictures then the children, my aide, and I sign the bottom. I tell the children this means they promise to try to follow the rules. As for discipline plans I don't have a set plan I follow. I do use the red, yellow, green light system for the whols group. I also have a tree of kindness where the children add leaves as they are "caught" being good/making good choices. Word of caution try to phrase your rules in the positive- I always avoid the words "don't" and "no". Good luck!
     
  4. lilygirl

    lilygirl Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2008

    Kevin knows the rules

    I am using the book "kevin knows the rules" by molly dowd to introduce my rules this year. The rules are similar to the ones you have listed, and the book is adorable with great illustrations to model the rules for your students. It comes with a matching poster as well. Good luck on your first day!!
     
  5. kidsalot

    kidsalot Comrade

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    I'll have to check Amazon to see if i can find that book. This year i have 25 students so I know it will be challenging. Most of them are boys!!
     
  6. prinjess82

    prinjess82 Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2008

    This is my third year teaching kinder. I have found that having the kids come up with rules at the beginning of the year helps them claim ownership over them. I usually read a story about an unruly classroom or student...and then we discuss appropriate behavior and what kinds of rules we need to have a nice classroom. You guide them by asking questions like" How do we treat our friends?" "What do we do if someone is talking?", etc. Here are my usual rules.
    Possible Rules:
    Treat your friends with respect.
    Keep your hands, feet and other objects to yourself.
    Raise your hand and wait to be called on.
    Take care of your classroom and supplies.
    Listen (do not talk) when someone is speaking.
    Work quietly and do your best work.
    Follow all school rules.


    As far as a discipline system, I do the green, yellow, orange, red. I have mine on a color coded yardstick and everyone starts their clip on green . Yellow is a warning, orange is a time out and teacher talk(to discuss behavior), and red is a note home or principal visit (depending on the severity or frequency). At my school we send home behavior forms every day with their "color" for the day.

    I try to avoid class consequenses. I instead offer individual and class incentives. We use keystone at my school so I give my kids paper keys when they are doing well (can use tickets). They write their names on these keys and put them in a jar. On Fridays I draw keys and those kids get to choose from my treasure box. The student witht he most keys each week becomes my "star of the week." The class as a whole can also be given "class keys" ..the winning class becomes the "star class" and gets a banner. I have also heard (and will probably try this year) doing a jar of marbles as a class incentive. you have two jars, one is full of marbles, one is empty. Whent he class does well or gets a compliment a marble is moved to the other jar. But if they get a bad report or have trouble marbles are removed. If all the marbles get transferred to the other jar they get a party or other prize.

    Ok..enough rambling..good luck!
     
  7. little317

    little317 Groupie

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    Aug 11, 2008

    Here are my rules:
    Helping Hands
    Looking Eyes
    Listening Ears
    Quiet Voices
    Walking Feet

    I have a rocket ship behavior chart and they have to get to the moon. Each day of good behavior means they move up one level of the ship. When a student reaches the moon he or she can go to the treasure box. Some kids only take a week, others....it takes longer. I don't like giving prizes too often and for trivial things. They know they have to work really hard.

    Here is a picture. Scroll to the right to see the moon.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. little317

    little317 Groupie

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    Oh and we have a school wide plan too. Each class can earn Eagle Bucks for good behavior outside our classroom. They can earn these Eagle Bucks and trade them in for class rewards like Hat Day, Extra Recess, indoor game time, Movie and Popcorn, Face painting, Lunch with our Principal and our Eagle the school mascot.
     
  9. jennstarr12

    jennstarr12 Companion

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    Aug 11, 2008

    I definetely plan to discuss the rules as a class, that was somehting we did during my student teaching semester also. I really like the way your rules are worded =) and the idea of signing the bottom except i dont know if all the kids will be able to sign their names on the first week!
     
  10. jennstarr12

    jennstarr12 Companion

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    that is very cute =) i would like to use somehting like that!
     
  11. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Aug 11, 2008

    If you plan on using the red, green, yellow, I once saw a really good idea in a first-grade classroom. The teacher made traffic lights simply by cutting out a black rectangle for a background, and then gluing on green, red, and yellow lights. Each circle had a piece of velcro in the middle and the children moved their name along the lights (they each had their own small light).
     
  12. Rachel0624

    Rachel0624 Rookie

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    Aug 12, 2008

    I am currently going through training for Conscious Discipline by Dr. Becky Bailey. It is WONDERFUL. It uses brain research to help you understand why you react and how kids react to situations. She does not believe that you need any kind of behavior board because it just tears a child down rather that build them up. I have used the traffic light in the past and I can see how this would happen because the other kids go home and tell their parents, "Oh Johnny was at Red again today." I am going to try to not use it this year, we will see how it will go. Dr. Bailey teaches deep breathing techniques for the kids to use instead and has a safe place for kids to go (I guess it is similar to a time out but it is not a punishment to go there, they chose to go there). The safe place has comfy cushions, fidgit toys, doodling pad, picture album with pictures of the students families, and posters of the breathing techniques. I am probably babbling now, check out her website www.consciousdiscipline.com
     
  13. prinjess82

    prinjess82 Rookie

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    Very cool..especially since I do a "star theme" in my room. Silly question...how do you movethe little guys, do you staple them on each day? I may do them on clips of velcro. Thanks.
     
  14. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    In my pre-k student teaching placement they used conscious discipline. I liked it for some reasons, but not others. For example, one boy had very poor impulse control. He would never use safe space (NONE of the kids did), so the teacher eventually made him go there just so he could be taught that it was there and what it was used for. It worked amazingly well for him. The only problem was that none of the kids ever used safe space. I never saw one child choose to go there, even though it was introduced and modeled almost weekly.

    Also, there was no discipline for children who hit, kicked, spit, name called, etc. It was just a conversation about why they did it, what they could have done differently, etc. I think that behavior problems should be talked through, but there should also be consequences. I understand the idea of embarrassment over stop and go lights, but part of me thinks that we baby children too much. It killed me to see kids just kick and hit and apologize and not be disciplined. They should learn how to work through difficult situations, but they also need to learn that there are consequences for inappropriate behavior.

    I haven't read the book, though, so maybe I have a lot to learn!
     
  15. mrs27

    mrs27 Rookie

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    Aug 14, 2008

    I tend to agree with you, although I too have not read the book. I feel like some behaviors need to be handled with a consequence and of course an explaination as well. Maybe I am a little "old school" in my thinking (even though I am a fairly new teacher), but I feel like consequences such as time out get a bad rap these days and yet it can be effective and meaningful for a child. I am a private preschool, but I know the local Elementary doesn't tolerate hitting ect... at all.
     
  16. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Yeah, I understand the whole embarrassment issue, but sometimes I think a child just needs to be removed from the situation in order to calm down and reflect (with guidance, of course). And for some children having to miss 5 minutes of free choice is something that will motivate them to learn and practice proper behavior. I know the motivation should be the desire to treat others well, but they have to learn the behavior somehow, and they'll eventually realize that positive behavior is much more pleasant for everyone.

    I'm just rambling a lot now! :lol:
     
  17. little317

    little317 Groupie

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    I took this picture before I put velcro on. I put velcro on the rocket and little velcro dots on the astronauts.
     
  18. MissB

    MissB Companion

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    Oooo, I haven't read that book, but I've heard of it. I hope to read it soon.

    I follow the Responsive Classroom Approach. I spend the first week talking about the students' hopes and dreams for kindergarten. Then the next week we make a list of rules together (the process takes a few days- brainstorming and organizing the list into a few rules). We don't make the rules right away beacsue i want them to think about the great things we've done in the first two weeks and what we had to do (be kind, take care of materials, keep hands and feet to ourselves...) to have a good time and learn.

    The rules are always framed in a positive way (keep hands and feet to ourselves, instead of no hitting).

    I also have the students sign their names to the bottom. Then I always come back to the rules throughout the year. "Sally, I see you are following our take care of materials rule." So I am always reinforcing the good behavior.

    I use a time out space, but I call it the "take a break" chair. We practice early on, that it's not for punishment, that it is a place to regain control. I teach the students deep breathing and other ways to calm down, so they know what to do when they go there. We all take turns sitting in the time out chair the first few days after it's introduced.

    I don't do a stop light or other system, because I believe that the consequence should be related. And like someone else stated, it is embarassing and takes away children's dignity.
     
  19. Rachel0624

    Rachel0624 Rookie

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    Aug 14, 2008

    That sounds very similar to Conscious Disipline
     
  20. nv1964

    nv1964 New Member

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    Aug 14, 2008

    This is my first-year kindergarten teaching for students within autism spectrum. Although I've been teaching for a while as a resource room teacher/sped., this is my first year being a classroom teacher. To manage behavior, I'm looking for individual behavior charts that could be simple & easy to speak to kids with ASD what rules are expected, and to tell them how they did on a daily basis. Any K-teacher for kids with autism, please share your daily behavior management.
     
  21. little317

    little317 Groupie

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    There is a program called Board Maker that you can use to set up personal schedules for children, make signs that portray the rules, etc. Awesome program! I'm not special ed, but I had a student last year who needed something like this to help him follow directions, know what was coming next.
     

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