RICA video option

Discussion in 'Other Tests' started by Sarah Ramsey, Aug 29, 2017.

  1. Sarah Ramsey

    Sarah Ramsey New Member

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    Aug 29, 2017

    I have failed the RICA more times then I can count. Has anyone done the video assessment? If so what can you tell me about it.
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Aug 30, 2017

    It was reconfigured a few years ago, but I think the passing rate still isn't very high.

    How close have you come to passing? What are you seeing on your score reports? Is the pattern of plus marks across the five domains pretty consistent? What about the case study and its comments?
     
  4. Sarah Ramsey

    Sarah Ramsey New Member

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    Aug 31, 2017

    This last time my results were
    Planning +++
    Word analysis +++
    Fluency ++
    Vocabulary academic Lang +
    Comprehension ++
    Case study ++

    Score was 213 need a 220 to pass
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sep 1, 2017

    Pretty close, then. Nice score on word analysis (though you do still have a little room for improvement there - the scorers don't care where in the test one picks up the points to pass, so improving in an area of strength works as well as shoring up an area of weakness).

    What are the three components of fluency? Why do we care about fluent reading?

    If you got ++ on the case study, there should have been at least one diagnostic comment following it: you could have come up short on identifying a strategy, or describing the strategy, or explaining why the strategy would help, or any combination of the three. Which was it?

    Tell me about the domain "vocabulary, academic language, and background knowledge". What do you think each of those means?
     
  6. Sarah Ramsey

    Sarah Ramsey New Member

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    My case study said I needed improvement in describing instructional strategies and activities. It is hard because you are limited words. My guess is that I need to use more RICA vocabulary.

    The three components of fluency are accuracy, automicity and prosody. We care about fluency because it improves comprehension.

    Vocabulary: Words that students know or need to know to increase fluency and comprehension .

    Academic language: Words that are generally learned and spoken in a classroom setting.

    Background knowledge: Previous knowledge a student brings into the classroom about a subject. This could be accurate or inaccurate knowledge so the teacher needs to be careful and make sure that the preconceived knowledge is accurate.
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sep 2, 2017

    If you find that you're running out of space on the case study, you're working too hard. It's not an essay, and the scorers don't expect polished prose. What they want to see is competence, in the form of the technical terminology that allows fellow professionals to convey content in fewer words than are required to explain to, say, a kid's anxious parent. "Describing instructional strategies" is a frequent issue for takers of RICA. You don't have to spell out everything about what a KWL chart is and how it works, but you do need to give examples of what goes on the KWL chart for the specific situation in hand.

    Good start on fluency - as far as it went. Tell me about accuracy, automaticity (make sure you spell that correctly in the test: that's a technical term) and prosody. Let me see some examples.

    Good start on vocabulary, academic language, and background knowledge, as far as they went. Let's see examples for each, please.

    (Examples... are you seeing a trend here?)
     
  8. Mr.A721

    Mr.A721 Rookie

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    Jan 7, 2018


    Just curious, since I am in the same boat as yourself, did you ever take the video option? I really want to pass the RICA, but I'm always within between 7-10 points from passing. At this point, I believe I want to explore a different avenue of passing this SINGLE EXAM to receive my MS Credential!
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 8, 2018

    What are you seeing in your diagnostics, Mr.A721?
     
  10. Mr.A721

    Mr.A721 Rookie

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    Jan 8, 2018

    Score with 213
    Domain I ++
    Domain II ++
    Domain III ++
    Domain IV +++
    Domain V ++
    Case Study ++
    *Describing Instructional strategies and/or activities.

    Score with 212
    Domain I +++
    Domain II ++
    Domain III +++
    Domain IV ++
    Domain V +++
    Case Study +++
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 8, 2018

    Good job improving on your case study and Domain III, Mr.A721. The ++ both times in Domain II is problematic, though: Domain II accounts for fully 1/3 of multiple-choice points.

    Domain II is Word Analysis. Can you list each of its aspects? How does each come into play with the following word? (Think about different grade levels here.)

    springlike​
     
  12. Mr.A721

    Mr.A721 Rookie

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    To my understanding, Domain II is phonological and phonemic awareness, concepts about print, letter recognition, and the alphabetic principle, phonics and sight words: terminology, concepts, instruction and assessment. CVC, CVVC, CVCe, etc. Dipthongs, consonant blends, vowel digraphs, decoding. What else am i missing?
     
  13. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 9, 2018

    Not too bad for a start. But what are you missing?

    (a) You're missing, or at any rate not demonstrating here, a sense of how this information is organized. You begin with phonological and phonemic awareness, and that's fine, except that all you do is name them before charging on to concepts about print, letter recognition, the alphabetic principle, phonics, and sight words; then, after a period, you drop in CVC, CVVC, and CVCe without etc. without any indication of how they relate to any of what you've already written; next, you bundle "dipthongs" (misspelled), consonant blends, vowel digraphs, and decoding all together as though they were the same thing.

    (b) You're missing structural analysis. Structural analysis (which I'd rather see called "morphology") deals with how a word can be broken down into its morphemes, or units each of which has a meaning. Dogs", "fishes", and "elephants" share the inflectional morpheme -s which indicates 'plural', though it's pronounced differently in each word (and, yes, "elephant" is a single morpheme). "Goodness" and "kindness" share the derivational morpheme -ness that makes a noun out of an adjective, and derivational morphemes as a whole come infor a good deal of attention once kids have gotten reasonably fluent with the inflectional morphemes.

    (c) You're missing my second question. Try again: let me see you apply these concepts to the word "springlike".
     
  14. Mr.A721

    Mr.A721 Rookie

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    Jan 9, 2018

    Sorry, diphthongs.

    Anyway, did you mean when you asked "springlike," as a derivational morpheme? Or something else? Perhaps I don't know much about this whole domain, which probably why I didn't pass this exam on the multiple occasions. (even though I do get testing anxiety when I get my palm scanned or have to have my picture taken, etc BEFORE the exam.) Or maybe someone can give me a topic to study instead of the books I've already used in Zarrillo and Schipper Books, which did improve my scores, but still haven't passed the exam yet. :(
     
  15. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 10, 2018

    First, let me deal with the test-taking point. If you get the flutters, but they go away once the test actually starts, you don't have test anxiety: you have a fairly normal pre-performance adrenaline rush. (The best test takers I know get that: there's always that nagging fear that finally THIS is going to be the test on which all the people who think I'm a genius will finally figure out that I'm a fraud.) Remember the feeling, though, because this is what some of your students will go through on every test for the whole test, complete with the bad voices in their heads trilling "You're so stupid, you can't even do this", and it will be up to you to help them learn to recognize that voice and to tell it kindly but firmly to lay off, already, so they can think.

    Now, back to RICA itself.

    "Springlike" isn't a derivational morpheme. It's a word. You're correct that it contains a derivational morpheme: what is it, and what makes you think so?

    But I chose that word because pretty much any component of word analysis can be illustrated using it. By the way, I very much like that you named phonological awareness and phonemic awareness in that order, since some key elements of phonological awareness have to be in place before phonemic awareness is even possible (though new aspects of phonological awareness kick in with older kids). Think about what kids of different ages need to be doing as regards word analysis. How could you use the word "springlike" with each age/stage?
     
  16. Mr.A721

    Mr.A721 Rookie

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    Jan 10, 2018

    Well for me, perhaps "Springlike," contains the words spring and like. And in terms of different ages, I believe lower elementary students need to understand the syllabic rules, differences between hard g and c and soft g and c, and need to master sight words to become fluent readers. Whereas upper elementary need to follow syllabic rules for words containing multiple morphemes/ multiple syllabic words or students have to recognize a word's root to decipher the words containing multiple morphemes. Again, maybe I am wrong or just need a better strategy to tackle this test, as I don't think I'm doing terribly on the multiple choice, but rather not doing so well on the short answers of domain II and IV and case study.

    And hopefully that's the case with the testing, although I've been getting those feeling the last few times I've taken the exam, so I'm not so sure at this point.
     
  17. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 10, 2018

    Well, I can tell you that you struggle to answer a question as it is asked. I asked you to show me what word analysis on a variety of levels would have to say about "springlike". You strayed from "springlike" after your first sentence. Try again, please.

    The golden rules of success on constructed response: Figure out what the question is asking and answer THAT, first and foremost. If you have side comments, fine, but save them for the end of the answer, AFTER you've stated and supported your answer to the question that was asked.
     
  18. Mr.A721

    Mr.A721 Rookie

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    To HOPEFULLY answer your question, for "springlike," particularly for upper elementary graders, I would have them split the word into two by showing the student how to isolate a word in context (e.g. Springlike becomes spring like) Once I'm certain that the student in question can see the word "like," in isolation, I'll ask them to pronounce the first word "spring," in isolation. Once I hear the student correctly state both words in isolation, I'll then ask them to say the words together. Hopefully that is what you were looking for. And if not, could you provide me an example of how I should structure the response?

    By the way, I'm not having a wonderful week mentally or physically, so if I don't answer the question to your specifications, I apologize. But this is what I deal with time to time, especially when I know I have to take life changing exams (RICA)
     
  19. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 10, 2018

    Hugs to you on your week. You've got some good content - definitely potential to pass this thing - or I would put less time into pushing you to be better.

    SPRINGLIKE
    Phonological awareness, early (pre-reading): Two syllables or claps. Rimes -ing and -ike, onsets spr- and l-.

    Phonemic awareness, early (pre-reading): "Springlike" begins with the same sound as "sing". Isolating phonemes: s, p, r etc.. Diphthong "long I", one of the four phonemic diphthongs of English (the other three, and spelling is immaterial here but I daren't use the International Phonetic Alphabet, are "ow", "oy", and the underdiscussed "long U" as in "pure"). Weird sound "ng" at the end of "spring". Isolating the phonemes of "like": /l/, long I, /k/. Isolating the phonemes of "spring": /s/, /p/, /r/, something like short i, "ng". Manipulating phonemes: realizing that "like" and "lack" and "look" and "lick" and "luck" and "lake" are different words because the vowel in the middle is different, realizing that "like" with /b/ instead of /l/ is "bike", discovering that str- instead of spr makes a different word.

    Phonics, early reading: "like" has silent E, and that's what makes the vowel long. "Spring" begins with a consonant blend /spr/ - we can hear all three consonants - and ends with a consonant digraph <ng> that spells just one sound "ng"; the vowel is short when a syllable or monosyllabic word ends in a consonant (and that's what's known as a closed syllable). Both "spring" and "like" are phonically regular - kids don't need that term, but what it means is that the earliest learned rules of phonics work perfectly.

    Structural analysis, early: "Springlike" looks like it's made up of two words, but most sensible early readers will leave it at that if they consider the word at all. At this age, "like" is something you do.

    Phonological awareness tying into fluency, later: "Springlike" is pronounced with stress on the first syllable

    Phonics, later: Long I can also be spelled <y> or <uy> or even <igh>, but not before <k>.

    Structural analysis, fourth grade or so: "Springlike" is an adjective that consists of the word "spring" and the suffix "-like". "Like" (the verb) is a word on its own that isn't a suffix, and it doesn't mean the same thing: "-like" and "like" are homonyms (same spelling, same pronunciation, different meanings). "Spring" (the season) has several homophones: "spring" (the coiled object), "spring" (the source of water) and "spring" (a leap up or to leap up); what "springlike" means will be determined partly by context.

    Phonological awareness tying into structural analysis: Some derivational suffixes from Greek or Latin make stress in a word shift (eLECtric vs. elecTRIcity, deFINE vs. DEFinite vs. defiNItion), but Germanic derivational suffixes like -like, -full, and -ness don't.

    Does that help?
     
  20. Mr.A721

    Mr.A721 Rookie

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    Jan 10, 2018

    More than you can know, TeacherGroupie!

    And massive thanks for the hug! I truly appreciate something like that.

    Anyway, to preface my state of learning, I'm more of a learner who needs to see concrete examples before I can say or write on topics I'm really weak on or unfamiliar with. So when you kept the pressure on me by asking me to, "try again," I felt completely flustered as I really didn't know how to answer your question.

    I know you're an amazing teacher, but for me, I don't work well in that type of pressure. (Especially if I feel as though I'm a failure in this specific part of the exam.) I'd rather be shown a correct method of doing something before I put my take on it, if that makes sense? I'm not attacking you, and if you feel that I am, I apologize. But I felt this needed to be stated.

    Once again, thank you!
     
  21. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jan 11, 2018

    Let me recommend doing this on your own as a challenge: pick a word and get specific about how it plays out with these distinctions, and pick words that pose other challenges ("loanwords" might be a good choice for starters). If you have a list of reading words or a stack of reading-word flashcards, use them to scaffold your thinking at first - and if you then find yourself on your next test date with your fingers twitching and your lips moving as you mentally riffle through flashcards that aren't there, chances are very good that the terms will be.

    You might find it useful to go through your list(s) of reading terms and think up one or more examples of each from your experience that resonate with you - if you've student taught or observed, think back on lessons in which some aspect of literacy surfaced (and of course the lessons can be on subject matter that isn't English/language arts), and remember what was happening with the kid(s) involved and how.
     

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