Respect

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by TeacherApr, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    Nov 3, 2010

    How do you teach respect?

    My 2nd graders are disrespectful. That is 98% of them. The degrees vary however. You have some that don't look at you when you are teaching, turning around bothering others, playing with things in their desk, and talking to someone next to them. I could deal with it if it was only 1 or 2 or even 3 students displaying this behavior but I am having to stop teaching every 30 seconds (not exaggerating) to make sure students are paying attention. I'm tired of "lecturing" them. I've come to a point where I think the word respect needs to be taught but how do you teach it, especially when they aren't being taught it at home!
     
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  3. Dynamite Boys

    Dynamite Boys Companion

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    I'm having this same problem with my 6th graders. Well - with one period of them anyway. After asking a mentor for advice today I think what I'm going to do is discuss with them what respect is and what it is not. We'll do an "Above the Line" and "Below the Line" bulletin board. Above the line behavior is respectful in the classroom - Below the Line behavior does not belong in the classroom. When behaviors are happening that are not respectful, I can just point to the line. No guarantees something like this will work, I'm just willing to try anything!
     
  4. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Well, we work with respect in Bible class. I do an entire unit on neighbors, and what it means to be good neighbors and kind and respectful. I continuously emphasize and make comments about being good neighbors that even my students will say, "so and so is a good neighbor". Of course, I don;t think you are teaching in a religious school, so I am going to guess you can't go that route. Can you make a language arts unit out of it perhaps? I think it is something that really needs to be looked at. This is why I love teaching Bible, because we get to go through all of the character traits and you can really see the difference in the kids who are being taught it.
     
  5. Leatherette

    Leatherette Comrade

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    Nov 3, 2010

    Have you read Teaching With Love and Logic? That could help - it talks about specific ways to interact with children to increase the level of mutual respect. I also think that every adult in a child's life needs to value and teach respect. But you can't control that, can you?:rolleyes:

    You know what really gets me? Kids who don't say hi back to you when you greet them - this is not my students, but other people's students - they don't understand that they need to respond to adults other than their teacher.
     
  6. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    Well, I get how to control a handful of kids when they are being disrespectful but when you have 10-15 kids at one time doing it while you are teaching and the 30 seconds later you have 10-15 more kids it gets frustrating.

    The environment is a "joke" when it comes to character counts. We have the posters and then told we don't have the money to implement the program. I don't need money to implement any program, I just want to know what the lessons are so I can teach it!!!! grrr sorry I'm really frustrated.

    I'm intrigued by above the line/below the line. Could you go into more detail with that?
     
  7. Momma C

    Momma C Comrade

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    Have you thought about student contracts. Some teachers at our school have students and parents sign learning/conduct contracts. They actually do a lesson or two on what the contract means - it also spells out consequences. Our teachers also bring in the fact that a contract is a legal and binding agreement. Second graders are not too young for this. It has helped our teachers/students tremendously. You may have to periodically "review" the contracts with your kids. Lots of luck!!
     
  8. TeacherApr

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    So, do this for all 26 of my problem kids? ; )
     
  9. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Nov 4, 2010

    I think in a case like that you might have to implement some sort of systematic management. Our school now uses "SLANT" from the book Teach Like a Champion and it's amazing how well it works. Sit up, listen, ask/answer questions, nod, track the speaker. All I have to say now is "I'm waiting for 3 people" and everyone is sitting up straight, paying attention-they don't want to be one of those people I'm waiting for.

    In my opinion you can't teach respect. It has to come from an invested interest in them caring about you as a teacher and in what you are teaching. Maybe some type of role-playing activity where you are the student and one of your knuckleheads is the teacher. Act like they are acting so they can see firsthand how disheartening it is. My kids are always interrupting me and we were playing a game the other day where the students were giving each other adding problems. They kept interrupting him and I said "welcome to my world!". Now this kid really understands how annoying it is.
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 4, 2010

    I can't begin to know how you actually teach respect in school.

    Our kids seem to have it by the time they get to us. It's never been a big issue.
     
  11. MrMarblesTI

    MrMarblesTI Rookie

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    This gets to me too. In the past, I've said hello and allowed the kids to "get away with" not responding. Now, if I say hello to a kid that I know who doesn't respond, I stop, call their names and say "Johnny, what do you do when someone says hello to you?" That usually gets them.
     
  12. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    Same here...!!!!

    Or I'll ask them a non academic question "Were you running in the hall?" and they stare at you... :mad:and I"ll ask it over and over again and they still stare at you....gah!
     
  13. 3Sons

    3Sons Connoisseur

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    Nov 4, 2010

    There's nothing inherently Biblical or religious about being a good neighbor, and I really don't see why she couldn't teach it pretty much exactly the way you do, but without the Biblical references.

    If the kids bring the lesson home, parents can supplement with their own interpretation of whatever tradition or reasoning for their values they choose.
     
  14. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Nov 4, 2010

    Let me start by saying my post isn't addressing the OP's post.

    I wonder if actions such as this might be a carry over from what we now teach our children. Do not speak with any adult you do not know. Do not go in their house, do not go in their car, do not go up to them if they speak to you. Basically, we teach them do not trust strangers. Stay away because you never know when they may be dangerous. If the crossing patrol wants you to go to the car, don't go. If the janitor wants you to go alone with him for something, take a buddy or do not go.

    I wonder how these mixed signals confuse our children.
     
  15. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Nov 4, 2010

    The behavior you described does sound frustrating, but very normal for that age. What you described does not sound like intentional disrespect, just young children - you will have to choose 3-4 most important rules, talk about them, post them in the classroom, then enforce them and model the behavior you want.

    I have a student who so constantly interrupted I was about to come unglued! I had to have several talks with him about waiting his turn to talk. Finally he and I came up with a signal I would give him if he was interrupting - the signal means "You are interrupting, it is not polite, I will not talk to you until you raise your hand." It worked!

    It is a long hard process to get from a big class the behavior you want, but it will happen if you are consistent. I second the Love and Logic, but I recommend you get the videos - they changed so much about my classroom management, made me a much happier teacher, allowed me to understand kids better, and gave me tools that almost totally removed frustration/anger from my daily life!!
     
  16. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    Thanks for that reassurance!
    I did a lesson about respect today and it went rather well! They were so engaged and motivated to do the activity after our discussion. Step 1 though....and a baby step...heh
     
  17. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    Nov 4, 2010

    We try and deal with the definition of Respect in the classroom.We set up behavior that helps the class to learn as opposed to behavior that keeps the class from learning. We call them class helpers as opposed to class cheaters(cheats the class out of learning)We need to reinforce who is being a class learner and why and occasionally,I hope, why someone is cheating us from learning.
    Try Respect or Disrespect role plays.
    Examples:
    You raise your hand to answer a question as opposed to calling out while other are raising their hand.
    A classmate pushes you out of line and takes your place.
    A friend borrows your markers and returns them with two missing.
    Have children make up some of their own ideas for respect and disrespect to act out.
     
  18. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Nov 4, 2010

    Second graders are notoriously chatty! They're just starting to get used to being social and having little friends and gossip and such. This may not be the best method, but what I do is identify the problem kids or the ringleaders that rile the class up. Last year, I had a really tough class because there were about 5 main little boys that would get everyone goofing off and acting up.

    I sort of made an example out of them. I would stop my lesson and call their parents in front of everyone. THose boys kept losing their recess. When they acted up with the manipulatives, they would lose them.

    Two of them stole candy from my desk so they did not get to participate in the special Art project that I had ordered from a speciality store for the class.

    It didn't happen overnight, but the class gradually got better because they started seeing the ringleaders getting punished and realized it wasn't worth it.
     
  19. Momma C

    Momma C Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2010

    Do it with all of your students. :thumb:
     
  20. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    I'll take this suggestion too!

    I have decided that we are going to focus on respect as a class for the month of November.
     
  21. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Best of luck to you. I think roleplaying is a great, entertaining way to reach and teach children positive behaviors.
     

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