Requesting extra supplies for kids who won't have them...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ecteach, Jul 22, 2013.

  1. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    Jul 22, 2013

    Someone who teaches 3rd grade told me that she always puts more supplies than she knows the kids will need on her supply list. She said she does this so that she can give some of the extra supplies to the kids who won't have any.

    Do any of you do this? I think I'd be rather upset knowing that my child's supplies were given to another kid.

    This brings me to my next question...
    How do you handle supplies in your classroom? Do you have the students turn in everything that they bring into you, and then divide them up, or do you have each student keep his/her items in his/her own desk?
     
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  3. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Jul 22, 2013

    I wouldn't do that. I also can't choose my school supply list. My principal has ours down to bare bones and has for years due to the economy.
    The only thing I plan on collecting for community supplies is pencils.
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Aficionado

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    Jul 22, 2013

    I ask for more than I need with community supplies like Kleenex. Because I know some kids won't bring in any.

    I would never do it for individual supplies. But I don't take up individual supplies either.
     
  5. raynepoe

    raynepoe Companion

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    Jul 22, 2013

    From a parent's perspective it really annoys me. When my son was younger he had some fine motor difficulty, so I bought the supplies I knew worked well. For example, Fiskar scissors, Crayola crayons, pencils that sharpened easily, and markers that could be left open a little longer. When I went into the classroom and saw they used communal supplies and the stuff I bought wasn't in his tables shared area, it really annoyed me. I was a full time student, and it was a bit of a stretch to upgrade his supplies. So the next year I labeled everything with a sharpie and his materials stayed with him.

    As a teacher I am probably going to share some of the student supplies, because it makes sense that if I have 12 kids with scissors, I shouldn't go out and buy another 8. I will try to be sure that the students have access to the supplies they brought in though....
     
  6. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Aficionado

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    Jul 22, 2013

    I think parents should expect that a lot of supplies will be shared in the younger grades. If they don't with their first kid in kindergarten, they soon learn!

    I personally would be MORE annoyed if I knew that the kindergarten teacher had to spend even 10% of her time handing out supplies to the right kids or playing detective for items that "went missing."
     
  7. bella84

    bella84 Connoisseur

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    Jul 22, 2013

    I always put a note at the bottom that requested extras as donations for those students whose parents may not be able to afford them, and I did actually have a few parents who brought in extras at open house. I never upped the number of required supplies though. That seems a little sneaky.
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jul 22, 2013

    I wouldn't mind bringing in extra supplies for students who didn't have them, but I wouldn't want to be tricked into doing so.
     
  9. thirdgradebuzz

    thirdgradebuzz Comrade

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    Jul 22, 2013

    I think it is to be expected that items like pencils are to be shared. I collect pencils for community use unless they are a "fancy" kind with designs, etc.

    I keep gallon bags in the cabinet labeled with the students' name for the rest of their extra supplies, and I pass the bags out every couple of weeks for the students to get refills of what they need. I also keep extras on hand for students who don't bring in the basics. The school provides me a budget for these.

    I don't ask for more supplies per child than they will actually use, except for tissues. (2 boxes per child) Some years that is more than enough, some years I have just about run out before the year is over. It just depends on how many of the students actually bring them.
     
  10. mkbren88

    mkbren88 Comrade

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    Jul 22, 2013

    I teach Kindergarten and we have community supplies. I let parents know that the supplies are used in that way upfront, and requested at Meet the Teacher for the larger things of glue sticks because we use them a lot. I had some really great parents who went above and beyond and we are pretty well stocked with crayons, pencils, and glue sticks for the rest of the year.
     
  11. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Fanatic

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    Jul 23, 2013

    I do not do community supplies and would never assume that parents 'expect it'. I would never give one student's supplies to another. Each child brings in their own labelled supplies. Anything they don't need to store in their desk - mainly extra pencils, highlighters, erasers and glue sticks - are stored in large, individually labelled zip-loc bags. This way when a student needs a new eraser they are already on hand at school. At Christmas I send home notes about which supplies students need to replenish. I've never had a student bring nothing and I often supplement with the extra supplies we have in the office.
     
  12. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Jul 23, 2013

    I don't have too much on my supply list, but the kids are asked to buy markers, crayons, colored pencils and glue sticks. I snag a bunch of extra when they are on sale and make a small community bin of each.

    Each student keeps his/her own supplies and if a child doesn't have them then I let them use some from my community buckets.

    In the summer you can typically get Crayola markers for .50, crayons for a quarters, etc. It's easier that way.
     
  13. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Fanatic

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    Jul 23, 2013

    If items will be shared then I think the parents need to know such as having a note on the bottom of the supply list. It is not another parent's problem to supply items for students who's parents can't/won't buy them.
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 23, 2013

    Glue sticks, pencils and post its are the only things from my supply list that I collect....I find the kids waste these items the most and it's better for me to manage when kids run out.
     
  15. chebrutta

    chebrutta Fanatic

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    Jul 23, 2013

    I have two lists - what the kids need to bring every day, and my wish list. The wish list is communal things.

    For students that simply can't afford supplies, my school provides them with a backpack stuffed with basic items. I find a way to replenish them as the year goes on.
     
  16. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Jul 23, 2013

    Exactly. Be up front with me and I'd be happy to purchase a few more pairs of scissors or half a dozen rulers.
     
  17. a2z

    a2z Aficionado

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    Jul 23, 2013

    I think it is awful to take advantage of those that do buy supplies. Not everyone supplying the entire list really has the extra money in the budget to purchase supplies for others. Many are cutting out other items in their family budget to afford the list of supplies given for all of their children.

    Even letting families know that extra of certain supplies would be nice, you might end up getting hundreds of extra pencils but no extra markers or glue sticks.

    I don't think there is any easy way to handle the situation where some kids don't have supplies except to get an organization to support the school and have their volunteer services provide for the kids that brought none.

    Practices such as that make parents lose trust in the school. Lies by omission are just as bad as out and out lies.
     
  18. geoteacher

    geoteacher Cohort

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    Jul 23, 2013

    As a parent, I would have been upset to know that the teacher 'padded' the supply list to provide for students who didn't bring any. I don't mind making a donation, but I like to know that is what I am doing.

    On the subject of communal supplies, both of my children had teachers who subscribed to this philosophy, and they hated it! They would bring Crayola products, etc. to school to use, and then when the time to use them came, they would end up with cheap stuff. I do understand sharing glue sticks and some basics, but I don't think everything should be communal. Just my two cents...
     
  19. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Phenom

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    Jul 23, 2013

    That seems sneaky and dishonest.
     
  20. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Jul 23, 2013

    This discussion seems to come back each year with feelings always being very divided. I understand the ease of logistics for the younger grades using communal supplies. It seems like the replies from parents here are opposed to that procedure. I had one "reluctant" learner of my 2 boys and it really helped his enthusiasm about school to pick out his supplies. I was a SAHM and we really scraped together money for sneakers for growing feet as well as the school supplies. If I found out my kids weren't using the supplies I purchased, I wouldn't be happy.
    Maybe others could share their strategies for making individual supplies work. The ziploc idea sounds good! I also think it's a great idea to ask for donations - as long as parents know they are donating for class use.
     
  21. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Jul 23, 2013

    I know some kiddos are rough on their crayons where others use them very cautiously and protective of their crayons/markers/pencils. I think the community thing is tough. I taught 1st and we didn't have community things. Looking back...glad we didn't because we had a big break out of pink eye towards the end of the year. I'm glad each child had their own supplies to deal with...one less thing to wipe down.
    If you like someone said use a wish list... if you get extras hey at least you'll have them for the rest of the year...
     

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