Recess Issues

Discussion in 'General Education' started by mathmagic, Nov 6, 2017.

  1. mathmagic

    mathmagic Connoisseur

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    Nov 6, 2017

    There have been a myriad of issues happening at recess - most (if not all) of them being choices that start appropriate but begin to cross the line into not being appropriate/safe/someone begins to become uncomfortable with a situation. This is the first year it's been coming up more than even just regularly, and so I'd love any advice in how to approach this (whether towards the whole class, or the individuals that come up).

    To note, I've done some whole-class lessons around the "wise" / "not wise" choices (including the gray area in between, and how to identify that it's starting to cross that line), we've talked about being assertive and sharing with someone what we want them to stop doing and why we need them to stop doing it, and I've had a ton of individual conversations about those choices. I don't want to brush it off (not at all), but rather want to build their independence in handling those situations, as well as trying to quash the number of unwise choices that are happening. Any thoughts?
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Nov 6, 2017

    Have you and your students discussed or heard of Kelso's choices? I believe students are usually taught to choose two, and if they still have an issue talk to a teacher.
    [​IMG]
    On another note, my school is having big problems with recess behavior this year also. It seems to me that students are becoming more dependent on adults to solve problems, and have fewer of their own problem solving skills. I think adults these days are often more likely to be the problem solvers too.
     
  4. mathmagic

    mathmagic Connoisseur

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    Yes - there's a poster up in my classroom. That's a good piece to remind my students that are coming up to me a bunch, though...thank you for reminding me of that!

    I'm thinking of having them do some acting in class for different situations, so they can get practice being assertive with the "talking it out" or "telling them to stop".
     
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  5. Backroads

    Backroads Enthusiast

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    Nov 6, 2017

    Our counselor did a couple of lessons on this. I love these techniques, but it's still a pain in the butt to get some kids to use these. I muse that once upon a time we became so focused on protecting kids that now we find ourselves playing catch-up on getting kids to solve their own problems.
     
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  6. svassillion

    svassillion Rookie

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    I agree completely. And it can be tough to tell kids to work it out on their own because then you risk getting a parent complaint that you're not helping students solve issues which ends up leading them to label the other student a bully without even knowing what truly happened.
     
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  7. Obadiah

    Obadiah Habitué

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    Nov 10, 2017

    I'm reading that this is becoming all too common, that kids are self centered and unsure how to socially cooperate. I wonder if in many cases they are imitating the adult world. Yesterday was a prime example. I was in the right lane of a business district, the car in the left lane was barely ahead of me, just up ahead was road construction in the middle of the road, and a speeder zoomed right between us! Later, I was roaming through CVS, and a husband and wife were "discussing" which product she would buy. The husband was yelling at the wife because he didn't hear her say which product she was picking up to put in the cart, (and why she had to even say it, I don't know).

    Perhaps a game I played might help. Put a special politeness rule on the board each week and the students find ways to incorporate that rule during the week. I had a student choose the rule from random from a box.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 10, 2017

    Unless a teacher is supervising recess, I wouldn't be giving up my non-contact time to teach about recess behaviors. Seems like these concepts could be taught within regular class time. Maybe see if the guidance counselor has time to co-teach about choices.

    Also, coming inside to play with toys seems like a reward for bad behavior.
     
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  9. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Fanatic

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    Nov 10, 2017

    Do you ever do recess duty? We had to do it regularly (at least once a week) and when there were lots of problems happening, I always switched my 'zone' so I could be in the same space as my students. Our psychologist always says that in order to truly coach some students, it has to happen 'in the moment'. So when conversations and problem solving in the classroom weren't working, I did it during recess. It was also very interesting to observe what was actually happening vs. the stories and complaints I was hearing.

    When my students came in upset about recess my first question was, "So what did you do about it?" 9 times out of 10, the issue had been dealt with - either by another teacher or the kids solved it on their own. So then I always said, "Great. It's solved, let's all move on."
     
  10. mathmagic

    mathmagic Connoisseur

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    Nov 10, 2017

    I don't have recess duty, but I do occasionally spend time at recess interacting with students. Recently, I've taken several of the recesses and tried to nonchalantly watch the interactions taking place between the groups of kids where issues have popped up, so that I can get a more true idea of the leaders, the followers, and which kids truly are making the wise choices or unwise choices.
     
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