Real-Time Data in Math Instruction

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by JimG, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Dec 16, 2017

    We will be 1:1 starting next semester. I am exploring ways to use this to get real-time feedback from students before, during, or after instruction. Does anybody have ideas or resources that have worked for you?
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2017
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  3. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Dec 17, 2017

    I would recommend integrating authentic activities that utilize the math concept and de-emphasize algorithmic only activities. I would especially integrate STEAM activities. My thinking is that not only does research support such integration, but it would provide more authentic discussion of the math concept, process, and self-evaluation/meta-cognitive skills. (Concerning the "A" in STEAM, I wonder if often arts integration is neglected in math problems, yet math is integral to the arts, such as how notes on the European music scale are formed; along that same line, why well-tempered tuning is preferred--an interesting experiment would be to compare the scales of toy electronic pianos and actual pianos since often you can't play an interval of a third on a non-well tempered toy piano; perspective in 2-D visual art; mixing paints or other chemicals; etc.).

    On obtaining oral feedback from a student, I use three techniques that work quite well. I speak reflectively with the student. After a student's response, I repeat their response with an indication for the student to elaborate. An example conversation might proceed as follows. Shannon: The difference in the sunflower's growth is 3 inches. Teacher: You measured the plant last week and today and found the difference is 3 inches? Shannon: Yes. Last week, it was 6 inches tall. Today it is 9 inches tall. Teacher: And you found the difference by.... Shannon: I subtracted 9-6 and the difference is 3...etc. Sometimes reflective responses are more productive in eliciting a conversation than direct questions, which often produce single answers. Another technique I learned at a workshop is to use "because" statements rather than "why" questions. Asking "why" sometimes shortens the student's answer or causes a freeze in answering, but reflecting the student's statement and ending with "because..." elicits a more detailed response. I do find (with elementary students) that sometimes I need to continue the "because" statement a couple more times before the student begins to open up with more detail. Another technique I personally find productive is to answer a question with a question, scaffolding to meet the student's current level of understanding. That way, rather than me just supplying an answer and moving on, the student continues to investigate and experiment at her/his own level of understanding.
     
    futuremathsprof and mrsf70 like this.
  4. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Dec 17, 2017

    I appreciate the feedback. All of those are outstanding suggestions for effective practices.

    I am looking specifically for technology resources to where every student can use their device to answer a question (multiple choice OR open ended) and that allows me to instantly see their responses from my device or project them on the screen.
     
  5. sportsguy

    sportsguy Rookie

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    Dec 21, 2017

    The best I've used is the real-time analytics through IXL. Basically it's a screen of your class that shows their current SMART score (generated by the number of problems they've answered correctly) and how they've done on the last 5 questions.

    I assign students standards to work on and if the student misses multiple questions in a row, their name will change to red my monitor and I will then give them the one-on-one support they need.
     
  6. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Dec 21, 2017

    Thank you for your reply. It has sparked my curiosity.

    As far as I am aware, in order to get reports for each student from IXL, it requires a subscription. However, anybody can do up to twenty free IXL problems per day without a subscription. Perhaps I could use this feature in conjunction with some other software to project the IXL problems and have students respond with their devices. The question then becomes what would the other software be.

    The only thing that comes to mind right now is Google Forms. I have never created a Google Form before, but I will play around with it to see if I could rig it to work in this way. Does anybody know of other software where students can input responses and it would give me the data? It could be something as basic as just giving four options A, B, C, or D and then giving me a chart showing how many chose each type.
     
  7. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Dec 21, 2017

    Google forms would be the most straightforward way to get the type of data you're looking for. There's also a game/card set I've seen online a few times that does something similar, but it only requires technology on the teacher's part - it's called "Plickers".

    But Google forms for sure would give you quick data and tell you who answered which choice.
     
  8. sportsguy

    sportsguy Rookie

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    Dec 21, 2017

    Yes, you need a subscription. Not sure of pricing. The district usually picks up the tab as they always seem to find funds when you're wanting to implement their programs. The subscriptions are well worth it.

    It sounds like you're looking for something that is more along the lines of "Here's a problem kids, do it, I want to see what percentage of you get it right." If that's the case, just download SMART Notebook. There's assessment software built-in where you insert questions, give the students a code, and they go to a website and type in the code and do your assessment.
     
  9. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Dec 21, 2017

    Your summation pretty much hit the nail on the head describing what I am looking for. We use Active Inspire instead of SMART, but I will look to see if they have something similar.
     
  10. Waterborne

    Waterborne Rookie

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    Dec 28, 2017

  11. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Google Classroom you can post questions within eliminating the need for forms. You could also post the link for forms in classroom if you are set on forms. Classroom will also limit your need for photocopies.
     
  12. mrsf70

    mrsf70 Companion

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    Dec 29, 2017

    Socrative allows you to do quizzes, quick check, exit tickets, etc., if you have one-to-one capability. It works on cell phones, as well.
     
  13. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Dec 29, 2017

    For those that use 1:1 devices for actual graded assessments, how do you combat cheating via screenshots?
     
  14. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Most people think rampant cheating is gonna happen. It doesn’t happen any more often than with pen and paper. With computers, there’s actually a paper trail.
     
  15. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Dec 29, 2017

    Do you have data to support this?

    It’s really easy to press alt-print screen and share a screenshot with other students. Short of getting IT involved after the fact to look into a user’s history, how do people combat this?
     
  16. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Does Socrative require a paid subscription?
     
  17. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    No study’s, just using 1:1 type system for years.

    Are you using chromebooks or pc laptops? On PC’s, its easy, on chromebooks, its not that intuitive which is usually a hurdle. I assume if you’re talking about pictures they would be inserting into google docs. You can simply look at the revision history when they submit it to you. If they are doing more than that behind your back, you should probably pay closer attention.
     
  18. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    It also seems like you’re talking about formative assessments that don’t count. Be clear on that, and there’s no incentive to cheat anyway.

    Keep in mind with socrative, and other quick question formats, most teachers fall into the trap of using very low level questions.
     
  19. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Dec 29, 2017

    I started the thread off referring to formative assessments. In the post where I brought up cheating, I specifically referred to graded assessments.

    We use Chromebooks. When a screenshot is captured on these devices, the image is auto saved to the user’s Google Drive. It could then be accessed later by the user from any device with internet access and shared with anybody.

    Say a student is taking a test on their device in class. Say the teacher watches this specific student’s screen for all but five seconds in class. That is all the time it would take to do the process outlined above and then later share answers with students who have the class during a later period. No amount of “paying closer attention” could eradicate this threat.

    So those that administer graded assessments that the students complete on their devices, what other safeguards do you put in place?
     
  20. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    You shouldn’t give graded assessments if you don’t feel capable of controling it. Again, there’s nothing to stop this kind of cheating with a pencil and paper either.

    If the test is something that requires so little from your students that they can memorize a response based on a screenshot, it’s probably a waste of students time taking it and your time grading it.

    If you want to be hated by both IT and other teachers for giving them more work, approach admin and request they set up special assessment portals https://support.google.com/chrome/a/answer/3273084?hl=en
     
  21. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Dec 29, 2017

    Thank you for responding to my request for a specific method with that link. I will ask our IT department about those options.
     

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