real life example of pyramid

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by amyt682, Aug 28, 2006.

  1. amyt682

    amyt682 Comrade

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    what are some real life examples of pyramids...i'm drawing a blank
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aside from the ones in Egypt?

    How about the food pyramid? You can find it on the side of just about any almost-helathy cereal.
     
  4. paperheart

    paperheart Groupie

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    What are you using it for? I'm not sure if you want specific names of ancient pyramids or like the food pyramid like Alice suggested.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    The other question is, are you looking for examples of pyramids in what passes for the Real World, or are you looking for three-dimensional models of pyramids, or both? (There are different kinds of pyramids, of course.)
     
  6. amyt682

    amyt682 Comrade

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    three dimensional examples...i have solid wood examples of cylinder, rectangular prism, sphere,etc but not a pyramid...i was trying to think of something I could bring in to show instead of showing a two dimesional one from a piece of paper...
     
  7. Doublescoop

    Doublescoop Companion

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    a prism?
     
  8. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    A prism isn't a pyramid. A prism has bases that can be congruent triangles or rectangles or hexagons or whatever, and the faces between the bases are rectangular or parallelogramic - so a Droste chocolate pastilles box is a hexagonal prism. A pyramid has one base that can be a triangle or rectangle or hexagon or whatever, and the faces are triangles.

    Here are a couple of incredibly cool Web sites that might help. The first one is full of the most astonishing paper models...

    http://www.korthalsaltes.com/
    http://www.mathsnet.net/geometry/solid/nets.html
    http://www.learner.org/channel/courses/learningmath/geometry/session9/index.html
     
  9. SpecEdTeacher

    SpecEdTeacher Companion

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  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Depends on when you were taking Praxis...
     
  11. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    You could build one..... We had to build a Dodechohedron for our final "teacher math class" at UW-Madison-- I can let the secret out now (years later---well NOT THAT MANY YEARS)-- I was totally wasted when I was building mine in the hallway of my dorm drinking vodka/peach puker/OJ--- I think I got the best grade of my three "Math For Teachers" classes on that one...
     
  12. Ann2006

    Ann2006 Cohort

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    You're cracking me up!!!

    And double holy crap to Teachergroupie!!! I bow to you , oh math wonder!!!
     
  13. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Nope, nope: the math wonders are over posting about CSET Math. I'm just a pretty good explainer.

    As to the dodecahedron, assembling one while plastered in the dorm sounds about right...

    In case you wonder, and not that you necessarily do: deca- is Greek for 'ten' (you knew that), do- is for 'two', so a dodecahedron has 10 + 2 = twelve sides. Best easily available example of one that I know of is one of the weird dice used by people who are into role-playing games. For that matter, one of the gamer's dice is a regular pyramid, with a triangular base instead of the familiar Egyptian-pyramid square base.
     
  14. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Wow you learn something new everyday. All I know is it had triangles and squares and some other shape--- and it took a lot of cutting, glue, cardboard, and well vodka...
     
  15. Ann2006

    Ann2006 Cohort

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    OH STOP all of you!!! I guess not...the thread topic is pyramids!! LOL
    I scrolled back up to look!
    Bye!
     
  16. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oh, okay: I thought you were talking about a regular dodecahedron, each of whose twelve faces is a pentagon.

    What you are describing is a very different kettle of Stoli. Could be the rhombicosidodecahedron, which has twelve faces which are dodecahedra, 30 faces which are squares, and 20 faces which are triangles. And would indeed be a bear to make. There are downloadable paper models for these and LOTS of other polygons on this site: http://www.korthalsaltes.com/
     
  17. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I seem to have scared Ann off. It's not easy, being the resident geek <snif>.
     
  18. SpecEdTeacher

    SpecEdTeacher Companion

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    WAIT A MINUTE
    when i was in middle school we were learning about egypt and we made pyrmaids on shoe boxes using sugar cubes...i think it had something to do with burials, but thats not the point. can you make a pyramid?
    oooooor a real life example...building blocks (which can probably be found in your pre-k or k classes) have those triangle blocks that are pyramids...or what about coffee filters.
    i think i might just be reaching here...im posting my weird ideas so that someone may read them and come up with something thats actually good. good luck!
     
  19. Ann2006

    Ann2006 Cohort

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    :) HEE HEEE,....I'm still secretly reading!!!!

    I don't think you are a geek...not that there's anything WRONG with that.:)
     
  20. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    With sugar cubes, a smooth-sided Egyptian-style square pyramid's going to be a little tricky: some of the sugar cubes will have to be trimmed. You could certainly make a Mayan-style stepped square pyramid.

    The triangle blocks in pre-k and k classes aren't pyramids, if you mean the ones I think you mean: they're prisms, because the triangular faces don't have any common edges. In a pyramid, each triangular face has two common edges with other triangular faces.
     
  21. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Yeah maybe it was more complex...
    Okay so I lived in a "learning community dorm" (of 800 + people) anyway it was crazy fun at times and one of the crazy things we had was a scavenger hunt and well one of the things on the lsit was to create the state capital of wisconsin using dorm mashed potatoes and our building which looked like a Chicago Housing project out of cheese... the post about sugar cubes reminded me about that..

    Yeah MATH For teahcers-- all three of the classes SUCKED--- Majorly! One we had a fantastic teacher who told us "I'm not good at explaining things" Well then I am glad you are teaching my class--- Writing 3-4 page papers about math wasn't my thing---
     

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