Reading Program Set Up...

Discussion in 'Fifth Grade' started by BreezyGirl, Jul 23, 2015.

  1. BreezyGirl

    BreezyGirl Companion

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    Jul 23, 2015

    This is my first time with my own class. Excited!

    I'm working on my yearly LA overview. I know what and how I will address the oral and writing portion. This is more a question about the many reading set ups out there.

    Here is my plan...

    Silent Reading:
    I have always had reservations about sustained silent reading just to have the kids read for 30 minutes a day. Most classrooms I subbed in did this after lunch and it was more of a quiet time. I never saw the benefit as kids would wander, talk, just sit there. I am thinking I am going do the required 30 minutes of silent reading (it is in our provinces objectives) but turn it into a Reader's Workshop. That way they have their reading but now it serves a purpose: mini lesson on a skill/strategy and a few times a week a quick written assignment done in a notebook.

    Classroom Library:
    I'm coming into a room with almost no books. And what's there is dated. I scored 50 books which I'm excited about! I will continue to look for all kinds. But for now I am thinking of creating a library with all levels: grades 3-7 as long as the interest levels fall into the 5/6 category. I'm not going to level the books but rather will keep track of who is reading what during Readers Workshop. Then I can assess the students and make suggestions on books if they are at too high or too low of a level. My outcome is to have kids enjoying the books without too many rules. However... I do have books like The Weather Fairies that I wouldn't want being used for the workshop. I was thinking I could put a little red circle sticker on those types and explain that these are no goes for the workshop. Of course I would give a good explanation as to why and depending on reading levels some may be able to use them.

    Novel Studies:
    I would like to do 3. The last one being an independent novel study. We don't have class sets so I was thinking I could do the reading. I could add the skills and strategies that we are learning in the workshop too. Has anyone done it this way? As of now, I am thinking of the books: The Miraculous Journeys of Edward Tulane, Tuck Everlasting, and Number the Stars.

    I am waiting to assess the class to see about guided reading groups. I know the kids from last year and the majority are at level. I just want to make a positive reading environment where they don't see it as a chore.

    Any input would be very much appreciated! I'm still in the set up phase. Oh. And I have a 5/6 split but only 5 Grade 6s.

    Thanks! Sorry this was so long.
     
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  3. phillyteacher

    phillyteacher Comrade

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    Jul 28, 2015

    I highly, highly recommend a couple different books (quick reading) that may be helpful:

    1. The Book Whispere, by Donalyn Miller. This is all about independent reading and setting up students for success with that, also building in skills mainly through independent reading and shorter mentor texts. It is EXCELLENT!

    2. The Daily Five, by Gail Boushey & Joan Moser. This is very trendy right now but the ideas are really good so don't let the trendiness turn you off to it. It is about the structures/ routines within which you do guided reading, independent reading.

    3. I know you said you've got writing figured out, but I also really love Notebook Know-How: Strategies for the Writer's Notebook, by Aimee Buckner. It's all about the writing portion of things.

    My plan for my 5th grade class this year (I'm new to 5th grade, a couple years into teaching) is to more or less use The Daily Five as my routine/ structure guide, incorporating stuff from The Book Whisperer into the reading portions and using the strategies from Aimee Buckner for the writing portions. Guided reading is also part of the plan.
     
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  4. BreezyGirl

    BreezyGirl Companion

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    Jul 28, 2015

    Thank you so much! I will look for those books today. I have read a lot about The Daily Five, but never thought about putting it in action.

    On a side note... I love Philly! :)
     
  5. themilocat

    themilocat Rookie

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    Jul 31, 2015

    Silent Reading (or Free Reading) is my favorite part of the day! For most of my students, it's their favorite part of the day, too! I tell my students from day 1 that the only way to become better readers is to read...a lot. I don't make my students read certain genres, levels, or lengths. I allow them to read I Spy, graphic novels, and world record books. My students love to read and the 20 minutes they get in reading class is usually not enough for them.

    Of course, I do have some students who struggle, and who can't stay focused at the beginning of the year, but by January, there's no problems. I set the expectation that they need to be reading during the Free Read time. At the beginning of the year, I read while they read, then I eventually start working in some conferencing time.

    Last year, I tried book clubs for the first time, and it was a big hit with my students. They loved being able to pick their group's book, reading schedule, and being in charge of their group's discussion.
     
  6. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    Aug 28, 2018

    I love this idea! Can you share how you incorporated the club into your classroom as far as schedule and setup? Did they meet daily? Were they required to read on their own time too, not just in school, etc?
     

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