Quit rather than be non-renewed--what now?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Kenz501, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    I'm open to it, but right now I don't really know where to look for those jobs.

    Shouldn't that be the principal's responsibility? It's not like I took the job and failed on purpose you know. I was fairly upfront about my problems during the interview, and they still hired me. If they thought I could do the job, isn't that on them?

    It's not like I was a vet and killed someone's pet or was working as a nurse and made someone sick. I understand the gravity of messing up in those professions, and I would expect a proper mentorship program to be in place to keep those mistakes from happening. Doctors have to do residencies after all, so why not have something in place to make sure teachers have the training they need? It's fairly well known that a lot of teacher preparation programs don't really deliver what they promise, after all, so doesn't that make sense?

    That said, though, I'm grudgingly accepting that perhaps teaching, or at least what I've been trying to do, isn't for me. Way to make things way more complicated than they need to be, society. If there's truly no room for error, the teacher preparation programs should be required to make sure teachers know how to do the job before passing them.

    Thanks for the advice, but is there like a career counselor's forum or something someone could direct me to?

    These conversations, although truthful, are getting kind of discouraging.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  2. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Here's a start:

    https://www.indeed.com

    Just type keywords like "library" or "museum" or "administrative assistant" into the search bar.

    If you're hungry enough for it, you will find something.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  3. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    Starbucks has a pretty different hiring process than say, McDonalds. Starbucks is looking for people with strong people skills and communication skills. McDonalds is more open to hiring a broader range of candidates. I still think you should try places like McDonalds. You need a job and an income. You can't be picky.
     
  4. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    I can try to apply again, but I've been fired, let go, whatever you call it, from a McDonald's before. My supervisor told me that I was not "McDonald's material," which I think was either mean or harshly truthful, as when I worked there, I had a lot of trouble keeping up, mostly because they expected me to do things they didn't train me for. The video training there is good; too bad employees had to bend the rules to keep up with orders; I'm not good at rule bending, and fast-paced environments sometimes leave me very confused.

    Yeah, I thought I couldn't afford to be picky, either, but I did turn down truck driving school, and that would have been a very good income. My dad thought it was too dangerous, though. I would probably opt for that before fast food, though, because I don't want to risk being embarrassed in front of the kids I work with, for one thing.

    Being picky might pay off, though, if I find jobs I can actually do well. The freelance writing gig is decent. It's just that I need about eight more jobs like this one to make a living.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  5. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Were you? You tell us that you don't communicate well. Maybe you only think you are clear about your problems. Isn't not being able to clearly communicate your needs one of the big issues?
     
  6. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Driving a truck is very dangerous. You need to be constantly alert. You need to anticipate what will be happening all around your rig. You must be perfect in all weather conditions. You can't lose focus for long periods of time. There is also no way to train you for every circumstance you will come in contact with.

    Then there is the social side of driving a rig depending on where you do it. If you are doing long hauls and pulling into truck stops, there are issues with unsavory others looking to con the naive.

    Are you willing to work a rig that has known problems? Many trucking agencies don't want you saying anything when the brakes are going bad and the rig is out of disrepair.

    If you can't make snap decisions on your feet, you really shouldn't be driving a big rig even with training. Double check if you do go that route that you don't owe them the money if you wash out. Some of these schools are scams.
     
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  7. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Well, look into writing for a tech company or some other company. Those jobs are out there and update a resume tailored to writing that includes the gigs you have done.
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    A bad year can set a student back for the rest of their lives. It can change their self-confidence and how they approach the remainder of their education. A bad year can cause a student's difficulties to go unnoticed and cause them to be seen as a problem of behavior in the future rather than an educational need.
     
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  9. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    No. That's true. What happened was I started to get scared after I got the position and started having problems. I had poor insight, so I wasn't sure if it was me or something they should have trained me for. Hanging out on the teaching forums didn't really help that much, either.

    I was supposed to take these complaints or concerns about my job performance to the curriculum planner, but I had no idea how to contact her, and no one would give me that information, maybe because they didn't have it or need it? (the principal even told me there was no curriculum planner--I'm guessing now that she meant at the school, but I took her literally) Yes, there was a disconnect between what I needed and what I was being given.

    No, I don't think it was altogether my fault, as (1) the principal knew I was trained in another state and was not familiar and did not know how to use the state curriculum guide, (2) I mentioned having autism (I waited to do this after I was hired but I still mentioned it), (3) I mentioned my disorder presented itself as a communication problem.

    I guess I expected them to be able to give me what I needed. I didn't see it as an issue until I started working there, to be honest. Going into it, I thought they were going to give me everything I needed to be successful as a new teacher, and everything was going to go well for once. Yeah, that just doesn't happen in the real world apparently.

    It was a harsh lesson, but I think it's at least taught me how to be my own advocate. I still think it's because they didn't train me. I can't see how anyone could come in and know what to do without being trained, or at least made familiar with the state curriculum guide, and they did have all of those resources available, but it took me a few months just figuring out who I needed to get in touch with to answer those questions. I didn't continue to ask my coworkers or my supervisor because it was like they were unaware this resource existed, or I was worried that not knowing would somehow be seen as a poor reflection on me, because I have a habit of seeming less knowledgeable than I really am, especially when I'm confused.

    It was middle school, so the students were only with me for about an hour or two each day, not the whole day, so they were exposed to plenty of "good" teachers that year, too.

    If it's such an issue, though, why don't they give the teachers better training? It's really hard for me to agree that I'm somehow "defective," and I think this is where this argument is going. I agree there's a problem with the system, though; if we're supposed to be as skilled as doctors, nurses, lawyers, etc. why aren't we given that level of training? Why does teacher preparation just tell us that all we have to do is know our subject, pass a test, and observe a classroom for a month or two? I'm not disagreeing that the students deserve good teachers; I'm saying that the teacher candidates deserve adequate training.

    I went through a legitimate accredited teacher preparation program in my state. I did not attend a fly-by-night for-profit college, and I did not just get an alternative master's degree. I studied how to be a teacher for around six years. Not once during the course of my studies did anyone give me much of an indication that something was seriously wrong. If my problems were bad enough to impede students' learning and this isn't something I'm going to learn on the job, why did they let me pass? They wouldn't do it with a doctor, you know!

    I feel cheated now that I feel like I have a better understanding of what happened. I get that it's not a good idea for me to keep taking jobs I don't know how to do, but I also think the whole system is unfair. It makes no sense to get licensed for a job you can't do; the schools that grant credentials to obtain such licenses should be charged with a crime maybe.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  10. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Then commit. People manage job hunts while working forty to sixty hour weeks.

    If you aren’t working, just what is taking up your time that you can’t commit to looking for a job?
     
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  11. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    I do work; it's freelance writing. It just doesn't pay very much. It's a "content mill" type job.
     
  12. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    My comment had nothing to do with you specifically. It had everything to do with the fact that you don't see the seriousness of what one bad year could mean in the life of a student. I would say the same thing to you if you were deemed the best teacher on the planet and made the same comparison comparing the job of a vet or a firefighter.

    So, you deciding where this argument is going is wrong.
     
  13. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Maybe it just goes to show the poor quality of teacher training in this country or the rampant grade inflation of colleges to keep the money flowing into their programs.

    But you got the same as the others who manage to get by on how they were taught.

    I've known people in other professions who did well in college but couldn't handle the job because the job required skills you can't teach easily in college classrooms.
     
  14. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Then work 70 hours a week between freelance gigs and job searching until you find that full time job. The rest of us have to do things like that when in tough situations.
     
  15. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    Look, even if college didn't teach me what I needed to know, why did I pass my internship if I really can't teach? I didn't take one internship; I took two--one for my bachelor's and the other for my master's. The one I took for my master's hired me as one of their co-teachers shortly after I graduated. If the school did a bad job of training me, why didn't they at least catch it while I was doing my internship? I agree that something went wrong here, but I'm not exactly sure what it was.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  16. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    I agree. It just feels inefficient if not impossible to search for and find good jobs. That's one reason I really wish I were getting more assistance from vocational rehabilitation. I wanted to work while I was still in college, but I eventually gave up on the job search. I couldn't even secure work study positions--I was either too scared or the interviewer felt I wasn't qualified. When I finally got a job as a substitute teacher, I might have felt like I accomplished something.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  17. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Maybe no one trained them to catch your problems
     
  18. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Because maybe your inadequacies were hidden by the support you received. Working with someone who can fill in your gaps is much different than being able to do a job independently. You were also mimicking the procedures and patterns of your mentor teacher rather than doing things on your own.

    An internship of any kind doesn't guarantee that you can function without a full time support available. It means that under supervision you can do certain things and that only depends on the quality of your mentors.

    Seems you might make a great aide or even a co-teacher when the other teacher is willing to pull you along for the ride. You might thrive in that school environment where you get stuck with a co-teacher so many others would absolutely hate who dictates how and what you will do in the classroom rather than let you have the reins and be creative.
     
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  19. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    But...putting that into a different context--in K-12 the educator is obligated to the student, and if the educator does not properly do his/her job, the educator is deemed "defective," right? Allow too many incidents of this to happen, and the whole school gets labeled, loses some funding, and has to be restructured.

    If that's the deal, why aren't colleges, which are responsible for training the teachers who teach the kids, held to much higher standards? I would be happy with this, actually, because it would mean that if I were trained in such an environment, I would be unlikely to fail. Plus, my boss would have a more positive opinion of me because of the positive reputation of teacher training, and s/he would probably be more likely to work with me and try to train me, instead of just writing me off as a "diploma mill graduate" which isn't true, but I felt like maybe that was the way my boss was viewing me.

    It's all a process, though. You don't start out knowing how to run a classroom; you have to work under a teacher who knows what s/he's doing first. Working under a teacher who has taught for years and copying her procedures and methods is a great strategy, and I do not understand why it isn't a mandatory part of the teaching internship.

    ------
    I realize there are malpractice suits that can be made against doctors, nurses, and others, and I would imagine that keeps even those who feel unprepared from hiding what they don't know; at least I would hope so. Maybe I should have pretended I was in a vet's office instead of a school and point-blank asked for a lesson planning demonstration. I was just too afraid that would have made me look incompetent. I didn't want to embarrass myself, and I realize that "it's about the kids," so teachers who have trouble doing their jobs probably wouldn't be much of a priority anyway. After all, if a nurse or doctor revealed that s/he wasn't confident, I would hope the hospital's focus would be on finding another doctor or nurse, not helping the one who needed more training! :nomouth:

    Let me think about that for a few minutes and get back to you...

    I guess I mean I wasn't give the steps to follow. See, it's not "common sense" to me what questions to ask to learn things, and I think it would have helped to have a list of questions, a set of goals, a list of learning targets to accomplish in so many weeks. I've already admitted that I sometimes have trouble wording my questions, and I'm also shy around people I'm not familiar with. I didn't feel like we were on the same page, usually.

    Neither my cooperating teachers nor my supervisors really knew what to do about these problems I had. I guess I was hitting all of the learning targets they set for me, and they didn't have anything else to tell them what was wrong. I'm not sure I knew I was autistic at the time, so...
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  20. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Feb 10, 2019

    Do you know what is less efficient in obtaining a job than searching for one?
     

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