PreK Funding

Discussion in 'General Education' started by callmebob, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Feb 12, 2013

    Not trying to get political, but what do you think of the idea of trying to make Prek financially available to all children?
    I have a hard time understanding the reasoning for this when there is not enough money for k-12 right now.
     
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  3. mathmagic

    mathmagic Habitué

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    Feb 12, 2013

    Not a full thought-out post...but more of a fleeting thought -- with both the Common Core raising the standards much higher and this raising the bar for funding much higher, perhaps even if it doesn't reach those points right away, it at least is forcing some progress towards that general direction. In both cases, that progress is a positive thing.

    Much like the suit in WA State about the underfunding of education. While it may take numerous years to reach (or maybe it won't ever quite reach) the adequate funding levels, it forces discussions about it, and it will slowly add more money to the system.
     
  4. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    I am all for it as long as money is not cut from K-12 spending to make it happen.
     
  5. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Money keeps getting cut from K-12 so that is currently underfunded. Not sure where the money would come from for this. And even if we did have the money for it, I don't think it should happen. Some responsibility needs to be put on parents in our society. Instead we just keep taking the responsibility off of parents.
     
  6. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Feb 13, 2013

    I may be biased being a Kinder teacher, but I can tell you any money spent on Pre-K programs is well-spent. We can tell day one which kids didn't attend any kind of program before and they often start off academically behind.

    I've heard the argument before that it's the parents' job to teach them at home, I think that's putting way too much faith in parents. Many don't know how or what even to teach their kids.
     
  7. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    This is true even of educated parents. When my child went to a very good pre-k program, one of the intake questions was, "Does he know how to use scissors?" My response, "Uhhh....I have never given him scissors, so I don't know." I went on to tell her that I didn't think a 3 year old would even be capable of using scissors. The lady looked at me like I was an idiot. ha ha.
     
  8. swansong1

    swansong1 Maven

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    Feb 13, 2013

    We already have it in our state. Definitely makes a difference in the readiness and social experiences of our K students.
     
  9. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Oh totally. I didn't mean that the parents weren't capable, just that many have no idea how stringent K standards have become. They think that if they know their colors and shapes they are ahead of the game, and that's just not the case.

    I have a lot of first-time parents and it's all so new to them-they ask me all the time, what can I do to help them learn to read, I just don't know how to help them.
     
  10. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Feb 13, 2013

    Why should tax payers pay for what parents should be responsible for? Either they should be teaching the kids these basic things at a young age themselves or they need to be able to pay for preschool themselves. yah it is putting a lot of faith in parents, but hello, That is a parents Number 1 job.
     
  11. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Fanatic

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    The cost of pre-school is so small compared to the costs later on to society. It costs $40,000/year for a prison inmate and only about $4000/year for a pre-schooler for a year. How do they decide how many prisons to build? Those in the prison business admit that one of the best indicators is to look at 5th grade reading test scores.
     
  12. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Feb 13, 2013

    Well, I have a totally biased opinion b ecause I teach pre-k for a parent participation program and then work at a private preschool in the afternoon. I am NOT for universal pre-k. Besides the private considerations, these are some of my observations:

    Public pre-k in my district - 1 teacher to up to 32 kids
    Private pre-k - 2 teachers for 18 kids in my school, 1-12 allowable legally

    Public - elementary teacher given half year contract who may have absolutely no early childhood experience but they are licensed teachers.
    Private - early childhood training - degree of education varies

    Public - lots and lots of worksheets and whole group time due to ratio
    Private - more play-based, hands-on, developmentally appropriate

    Public - grouped with older kids after school and are exposed to things they aren't ready for
    Private - with their own age range

    Yes, all kids should have an enriching preschool experience. Should everyone be pressured to do the same program? I don't think so.

    There are so many wonderful, thoughtful, intentional programs that provide children with great educational opportuntities that are different from public school - more art, music, etc. etc.

    Should we take away money from the public schools? Probably not. Should we raise taxes to fund it? Definitely not.

    Should 4 year olds be in full day, 5 day programs? Imo - no. They will be in "school" soon enough.

    Should we bump the curriculum down because of the pressure of standards, etc.? Definitely, not! It isn't developmentally appropriate to expect 4s and early 5s to do kindergarten work. Some can - some with start the cycle of feeling like failures.

    :2cents: You asked! :lol:
     
  13. passionateacher

    passionateacher Comrade

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    Feb 13, 2013

    That's funny, I was the same way. My daughter started K knowing all letters and sounds and by the 3rd week of school she was starting to read. BUT she had NEVER used scissors before! I just didn't even think about it! I thought that was something you learned in K!:huh:
     
  14. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    I guess I just don't see the difference between taxpayers paying for a Pre-K student and a 2nd Grade student. It's all about educating the child the best we can. We do have programs here in the public schools where it costs the parents a fee-but then you will only get the kids there who can afford it. Usually it's the ones that can't afford it that benefit most from the head start early childhood education provides.
     
  15. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Feb 13, 2013

    Very good response scmom. Thank you for your input.
     
  16. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Where is the line drawn. It needs to be somewhere. Right now that line is drawn at Kindergarten or approximately 5 years old. Prior to that, parents are responsible for the raising and care of their child financially. Why can't we keep it that way.
     
  17. MikeTeachesMath

    MikeTeachesMath Devotee

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    Feb 13, 2013

    Leaders in countries like Sweden, which are WAY ahead of us in just about every way possible, have the exact opposite mindset.
     
  18. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Feb 13, 2013

    They don't think that parents should be responsible for their own children?
     
  19. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Feb 15, 2013

    Our district has cut funding from Pre-K turning it into a half day (2.5 hours rather than 6 hours). This is the second year and already you can see the kids are suffering.

    We have more K and 1 students up for retention this year than ever before. (about 35 Kinders and 40 first graders) because they have such a poor foundation.

    Pre-K is about more than just coloring and having fun, it helps the kids learn expectations for school and the basics that seem so simple, like counting, writing, learning the alphabet, etc.

    Prior to cutbacks, a student could not pass K and go on to first grade unless they were able to read on grade level. That rule was changed immediately because they'd be holding back at least half the K class.
     
  20. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    Feb 15, 2013

    If the kids are not in a free pre-K program, they'll likely be placed in a daycare, which means parents won't have more time to teach their kids. I'm not sure I understand why people think not providing free pre-K will force parents to teach their children the basics. :confused:
     
  21. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    No, they think it isn't developmentally appropriate to teach kids to read until age 7. Hmmm....much of Europe waits to teach reading and their literacy rates are higher....
     

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