Pre-K Daily Reports

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by RedFox, Jun 4, 2007.

  1. RedFox

    RedFox Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 4, 2007

    Hi, I'm just curious what other Pre-K teachers include in their daily reports.

    Thanks in advance!
    Annie
     
  2.  
  3. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    2,700
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 4, 2007

    Do you mean a daily report that is given to parents? If so, we don't do them for the Pre-K kids. We do them in the infant, toddler and Young Pre School (the 2s) room but not in our 3-5 Pre School age room. We do have a one page sheet for the week where for each day we write down one thing we did in the morning with the kids and one thing in the afternoon. This sheet hangs on our "parent board" and when the parents pick up the kids they see it. Also, our weekly lesson plans are posted in a place where the parents can see them so anyone who wants to is welcome to read them if they want a bit more info about our week. We do daily art projects and they get sent home with the kids the following day. And any type of writing we do with the kids gets sent home as well.
    Having said that, if I were to suddenly have to start sending home daily reports to the parents I would include the following:
    what the art project was
    what books were read at circle time
    what science activity we did
    and a space for any additional info I'd want to write - for something special that happened that day (like today our cacoons hatched and the moths came out - I would write that on it).
     
  4. RedFox

    RedFox Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 4, 2007

    Thank you for sharing that information.

    Right now we're currently sending out a daily sheet that includes what we did during morning meeting (basically who the calendar helper & weather person were), the stories we read throughout the day, math, literacy, science, fine motor, gross motor, small group, and large group activities. It really seems like a lot of information, so I was hoping to get an idea of what types of information other classrooms are sending out. I am new to this class, and mostly curious if this is typical.

    Thank you!
     
  5. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2007
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jun 4, 2007

    This is based on a center i worked in several years ago. The last place I worked in only had reports for infants - two's class.
    Name
    teacher/s name/s
    Circle One:
    I ate all of my lunch today/I ate half of my lunch/I did not like my lunch
    Circle One:
    I had a good day/I was in time-out for_____
    My favorite thing today was: (fill in 1-2 activities)

    Additionally, the lunch and lesson plans are posted in the hall and in the classroom.
     
  6. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    2,700
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jun 4, 2007

    One tip I can give to make your life easier with this type of a form is that as much as possible make up your form and have options to circle. So let's say for fine motor you have always one of the following: legos, puzzles, Lincoln Logs, Tinker Toys or Pegs. On the paper have those 5 things written and then each day just circle whichever one you did that day. Or if 4 are pretty common but there are a few other things you do then write out the 4 and have a blank space for the days you do something different. Make sense?

    I did this when I was the 2s teacher and it made filling out the forms so much quicker b/c most days I could do a circle for most of the activities and just have to handwrite a few things. We always do a tactile which is either rice, water or playdoh. So on my sheet I have written:
    Tactile: rice water playdoh
    then I just circle the one we did that day. Much quicker then having to write the word "playdoh: or "water."

    So I would suggest to take 2 hours or so to make up a computer form with as much pre-filled as possible and only write what you can't do as an easy circle. Like the name of the child of the day you'd write in.

    In my personal experience most parents give the daily sheet such a quick glance that anything you can do to make it quicker to fill out is really worth it. They still get to find out what happened during the day but hopefully you can spend less time writing it out.
     
  7. lilkidteach

    lilkidteach Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2002
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 4, 2007

    I do not send home a daily report. I send home a Weekly Newsletter. It tells that parents the basic activities we are going to do that week, Important Dates and anything else I want them to know for the week. I know only about half my parents read these so if I sent them every day it would be a waste of time.

    I do send home daily reports for a few children with behavior issues. These are much more specific for these children however.
     
  8. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Messages:
    7,794
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 4, 2007

    I send home a weekly newsletter and it lists the basic art/story for the day and anything special that we are doing. Daily, I write on a white board and it is very brief, basically a repeat of the activity and I add anything else that might be of interest. Honestly, not many parents take the time to read it so I could write that we blew our noses all day and no one would know the difference!! They are in such a hurry to pick up their child and go home that they almost have nervous break down every night!!!
     
  9. Myname

    Myname Comrade

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2006
    Messages:
    321
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2007

    We have our daily reports prewritten out with some spaces to write in what changes. Eg. Our special kid for the week is always blank or the the theme line is always blank so we just write that in.

    we have a spots too circle as well. how long they napped.

    We have space at the bottom where we write in and personalize it. Eg.
    Emily loved playing with blocks this morning. She did hit another child today while playing and we talked about that. She loved to help her other friend with a puzzle.This afternoon she enjoyed playing with a friend in the dress up area.
     
  10. RedFox

    RedFox Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2007

    I was under the same impression - that parents appreciated receiving the information, but didn't pay too much attention to it.

    I got word today that shortly before I started in the classroom (I have worked summers at this center, just graduated from college and took a head teacher position, so I'm new to the classroom, not the center), parents were raising concerns with the director about the type of activities that were related to math specifically.

    I like the idea of creating a sheet in which I circle the activities that we did. Since I am new to the room, I am still going through closets and shelves discovering all of the different games and activities we have. By creating a form like this, even if I didn't use it to give to the parents, it would help me get a better idea of the options that I have for each 'subject area'.
     
  11. RedFox

    RedFox Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2007

    And THANKS! to everyone for their ideas! I appreciate it :)
     
  12. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2002
    Messages:
    6,125
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2007

    Like a lot of other places, we don't send daily sheets home foro ur older kids. Infants and Toddlers do, and our Beginner (2's) room sends a sheet home until they're potty trained, then they don't do it any more (their room uses it mostly to keep track of potty training, so that's the policy they've adopted). ALL classes, though, fill out a 'here's what we did today" dry-erase sheet that we hang either outside the door or on our parent board, plus have lesson plans posted weekly. Sometimes our "daily review" sheet is REALLY short, other times it's more involved. Typically, it's what we talked about at circle, what book we read, and what the two guided centers were, plus anything else of interest... a couple of sentances. Mine also always includes what letters we're doing for the week so they know what to bring for show-and-share on Friday.
     
  13. vannapk

    vannapk Groupie

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    Messages:
    1,301
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2007

    I teach public pre-k so maybe my circumstances may be different, but I send home a weekly newsletter. It includes our birthdays that week, upcoming district holidays, upcoming events, vocabulary words (I teach ESL), special events (picture day etc) and reminders- it varies weekly depending on our needs. A daily sheet would be a huge hassle as I have 22 kids and limited to no assistance.
     
  14. MsWK

    MsWK Habitué

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2007

    We write a daily note for each individual infant. We include a personal note about the baby's day. When I worked as an infant teacher, I had lots of parents tell me that they saved all the notes and made them into albums. I think the key with the notes is to make them really meaningful--to go beyond what a baby ate, when they slept, and what was in their diapers. I would try to really give the parents a window into their child's day--if they did something funny, or were totally miserable, or took 15 steps in a row!

    For our toddlers and twos, a note about the group gets posted daily, and we try to include whatever the children are likely to talk about doing--like if we saw two squirrels eating cheerios in the park, the kids might all still be talking about that, and not necessarily what our math manipulatives were for the day. We also post detailed plans that outline all the activities, and monthly newsletters.
     
  15. Kindtchr

    Kindtchr Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2007
    Messages:
    369
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2007

    This year I sent a daily preschool note with questions to ask the child about their day. ex.: What story did you read? What songs did you sing? What games did you play? I put some answers in parenthesis. Who did you play with? What did you do in art? I do it mainly to help the family have a conversation so the child can not say that they didn't do anything in school that day. It was only 3 days a week and I had the template saved so just had to make a few changes each day. At the beginning of the week I added a box with suggestions for families to talk about that theme or activities for them to do at home. At the end of the week I would add coming themes, events, etc.
    Next year I will have 5 afternoons with 2 classes so I may go to the weekly notes like I do for my kindergarten class that I teach in the mornings. Good luck- hope you have a great year.
     
  16. jenal

    jenal New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 8, 2007

    daily note

    We don't send daily notes for pre-k. The infants, toddlers and 2-year olds get daily notes and everybody gets a weekly newsletter from their teacher saying what has happened this week and what is upcoming for next week.
     
  17. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Maven

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    Messages:
    5,558
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 8, 2007

    (Teacher) Report is a bad word!

    Hi Red Fox,

    When most pre-k teachers here the word 'Reports', we run and hide.:eek: I see you are specifically referring to 'my kind of day' letters to parents. I find that most parents avoid the cubbies, and if you really want them to know something, you gotta tell them. I've been in centers where we wrote notes, and I found it to be a big pain, especially when I had to clean out tons of stuff that never was picked up.

    Weekly newsletters are nice. Post them on the wall for those people who say, "I didn't know that."

    But in general teachers in Head Start and State Pre-K are so busy with attendance, meal counts, home visits, ancedotal records, assessments, and end of month reports...we really don't have time to write another thing.:sorry:

    Sorry to be so down! But we have a lot to write as it is. Too many parents don't seem interested in notes in the box.

    Master Pre-K
     
  18. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2007
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jun 8, 2007

    I wanted to add that another way you can make it easier on yourself is to write in the information on one sheet and make copies. The toddler teacher made her own my day reports and filled in one a day for the week and made copies. Her parents wanted to know what the kids had eaten each day to watch for allergies. She would write it all in on a master copy, make copies, and fill in the info that related to only that child.
     
  19. Mommyof2xys

    Mommyof2xys Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 18, 2007

    I use a daily report in my pre-k class. It is a table that I made up on Microsoft Word. I have 5 rows (one for each day of the week) and 2 columns (homework and behavior). It stays in the child's homework folder all week. I have enough room where I can write a few short sentences, maybe 2 about the child's day, as far as for behavior. In the homework boxes, I give a short description, but this is usually previously written and copied so that I don't have to do that for 18 children each day. I have used it for 2 years with no parent complaints. They find them informative. They also have to sign them each day. I have a few K teachers friends that have used it as well.
     
  20. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Fanatic

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,536
    Likes Received:
    53

    Jul 18, 2007

    I like the idea of making one form and then just circling different activities.

    When I worked in an infant room we sent home daily reports for each child. We had a paper with spaces for what they ate, how long they slept and what activity they did.

    At my current centre we have parent boards, and we write the highlights from the day on a white board for everyone to read. We include any activities, what we had for snack and any upcoming events (i.e. "Bring your bathing suits tomorrow for pool day!").
     
  21. jlj

    jlj Devotee

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,156
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2007

    I can't imagine having time in class to write out daily reports, especially without an assistant in the room! I do a monthly calendar for my class. Each day shows one of the activites planned for that day. Each week I try to show at least one of the stories we will be reading, an art project, science activity, cooking project, field trip, special visitors scheduled (firefighter,etc.) poem or nursery rhyme, etc. One corner at the top of the calendar is a "NOTE:" area where I put short reminders, "be watching for..." etc. The other corner has our birthdays for the month. In the "Sunday" column of the calendar I list our Bible memory verses for the month. In the "Saturday" column I list the skills for the month- specific letters, numbers, etc. I use stickers and clip art all over the calendar to make it more fun and eye catching. I like the monthly rather than the weekly newsletter. This is kept in the children's BEARS books as well as posted on our hall bulletin board. I send reminder notes or calendar changes home as needed.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. gr3teacher,
  2. ally06
Total: 311 (members: 2, guests: 216, robots: 93)
test