Posting the standard every day

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Sep 2, 2018.

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  1. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Love it! Helps them focus their mind on what they're doing for the day, probably allows their brain to start bringing up prior knowledge, and in general, gives a structure for their brain to retain the information around.
     
  2. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    This is fruitless. He's hearing but not listening. How unfortunate.
     
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  3. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Let me give you a little help on how to not make it into a public versus private debate. See that word after "when" and before "middle". Yeah, just cut that out of there, and then you won't need the stuff before the first comma either. Easy game, huh?
     
  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I have a Single Subject teaching credential in math, which certifies me to teach math for grades 6-12. I’ve also had considerable success teaching younger students, though I cannot teach in an official capacity as I’m not certified to teach the lower grade levels. This does not stop parents requesting me to private tutor them, however, and their math skills become noticeably enhanced thereafter. That’s what I base my comments on. I’ve been private tutoring for almost ten years and have a very large clientele base.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2018
  5. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Correct. I meant comment. I thought I saw two question marks.
     
  6. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    And I have a degree in math, K-8 Cert, and a secondary (4-12? or 6-12? I forgot haha) endorsement for math, which allows me to technically teach high school, like you. That said, I know that my experience has lended itself moreso to elementary, so I know that that is my strength and area of expertise. I've tutored a couple high schoolers and written high-level math competitions, but again, my experience (especially within standards/curriculum) is mainly elementary.
     
  7. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Let me show you how you are: When I first meet a client, I ask them to show me how they have been taught to do something before I show them my methods. I shake my head if I see them trying to solve a problem using the tedious and ridiculous algorithms they were taught in public schools because it’s very time consuming and they are only solving it the way they memorized to do it. They actually don’t understand what it is they’re doing. I, personally, don’t use ever use Common Core Math instructional methods.

    Get it now?
     
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  8. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Well, I’ve never had transfers from private schools who were taught this stuff.
     
  9. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    :beatdeadhorse:
    (They really need to get rid of these smileys...it's a bad temptation.)
     
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  10. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    No. Common Core consists of standards, not instructional methods. They are different entities. I’ve taught with many sets of standards during my years in education. Not a single set of standards ever included a particular instructional method. Common Core is no different.
     
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  11. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I feel so bad, haha. I just am responding to people misinterpreting my posts. They should all be read an explicitly stated. I mean what I say and say what I am.
     
  12. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I know Common Core is a set of standards. I should have more careful when my words with I said “Common Core Math instructional methods.” Would it be more proper to say instructional methods as outlined in various Common Core Math texts?
     
  13. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    So???? If you don't want to make it public vs private, why even mention where they are transferring from?
     
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  14. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Because I’m addressing primarily public school teachers. Though, it is not necessary to say where they have transferred from, but it’s still incredibly frustrating for my colleagues and me because we constantly have to undo what some students were taught and bring them up to speed. It’s a lot of work and they should have mastered the material they previously learned wherever it is they came from, public or private.

    College professors and universities are saying the same thing: High school students are woefully unprepared for college-level writing and math. Something has to change, and that something starts when they are in elementary.
     
  15. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    I would leave Common Core out of it completely. It is a math text aligned to Common Core standards. The methods these texts choose to teach the standards are not all the same. If they were all the same then there wouldn’t need to be so many choices in textbooks.
     
  16. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Oh, I see. I think my confusion with the labeling is that the textbooks that my school uses (for different subjects) all say “aligned or adapted to CCSS” and use methods I learned in my earlier youth, but the texts that I despise merely say Common Core and not adapted to Common Core. That’s why I thought the instructional methods were specific to Common Core. Does that make sense?

    For example:

    https://www.amazon.com/Common-Core-Math-Grade-7/dp/1629502375

    https://books.google.com/books/abou...BAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button
     
  17. Joyful!

    Joyful! Habitué

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    Since we are completely off topic, by very nature of a student transferring to a different school that would mean they moved their home and thus came to your school or they weren't connecting with their education and teacher at their previous school, so they came to your school. That said, private schools receive students who are woefully unprepared from public schools and it is our job in the private sector to help them get where they should go. Conversely, I know of certainty that private school kids arrive at public schools woefully unprepared for their new public school, and it is up to the public school teacher to help get them where they ought to go. Sometimes we are receiving the students hoping that whatever wasn't working in school 1 will go better in school 2. I think we do a disservice to all teachers when we make the circular firing squad.

    You like Common Core, someone else doesn't. You hate lousy methods that someone else holds dear. Someone else despises the methods that you find to be amazing. Instead of being divisive and sniping at one another, can we just enjoy the beauty of diversity in education. Obviously, we each have an education and philosophy and set of experiences that helps us as we form our daily strategy with our students. That doesn't mean it is the only way to help students come to a full understanding of math or reading. It just means that someone who loves their class gives it all they have, day after day, and finds things to reach their students.

    I am a private sector teacher who has great admiration and respect for the public and charter sectors. I feel they accord me the same respect. We can be different AND effective for OUR students. I like everyone to share what they do because I can learn from that, but it is not enjoyable to read that you/they/someone is the only authority with the only true educational successful classroom. You are working with your kids. I'm working with mine. At the end of the day, if they can all read, write, communicate, add, subtract, multiply and divide and if they all know how to be kind, even if the other person isn't like them, then we should all congratulate one another.

    I say this with regard and respect, but hasn't this gotten a little less than supportive? Let's get the discussion back on track.

    I'm required to post objectives. I do so. I reference it every class period. I don't know if it helps students or not, but I know that if it helps one, I'm glad it did!
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2018
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  18. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    These two examples are not textbooks. They're both teacher workbook resources (ancillary materials) that have nothing to do with district-adopted materials.
     
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  19. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    And that’s why I’m suggesting that you do your research before forming an opinion, future. Your experience tutoring elementary students clearly hasn’t given you enough information to make an informed opinion.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2018
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  20. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    This is fair. I referenced these texts because when I asked the elementary students and above to get out their textbooks, they produced those books only and said that’s all their teacher uses. This happened each time I tutored these students and so I thought that’s what the texts must be after many repeated incidences of that. I wasn’t given any other information than that and so I had no other frame of reference.
     
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