Post Interview calling/feedback

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by TeachCafe, Jun 11, 2018.

  1. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Companion

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    Jun 11, 2018

    I had an interview May 31st that I thought went really well. It was for an ELA position at an elementary school in my dream district. I was shocked to get the call because I didn't apply for the position but I did give my resume and info to the principal at the district job fair months ago. It was just the principal and 2 specialists in the interview.

    They were writing down everything I said and it didn't feel awkward. I had an interview last year and I knew halfway in that they were just being courteous but that I didn't get the job. But I could tell. With this interview, I honestly felt it went really well. No weird vibes, nothing fake, just goodness.

    Now it's June 11th and I haven't heard anything. The principal told me I'd hear back either way and I belived her because a friend of mine use to work for her years ago and said she was one of the best and most solid principals she'd ever worked for.

    So....what should I say in a call? I did an email followup the next day. I don't know if I truly have the gumption/balls to ask but I want to be like "if I blew it, PLEASE tell me what it was and what I can improve on"

    It's SO hard to get into this district and I got an interview and now.....nothing. I was depressed thinking about my current school but now I'm just feeling lost about this interview. I'm trying to build up the courage to simply resign because I hate my district and school right now and do not want to be stuck for another year. My health was horrible, more gray than ever and just all around thinking I need to leave education. I somewhat dropped out of my masters because I could barely function to go to work and be around my "team", admin, students, and just the whole building.
     
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  3. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jun 11, 2018

    Next time, ask for a timeline of when you should hear something by so that you don't have to keep waiting/worrying. Around here, it's very common to get an offer within the same day, so if I didn't hear anything after a couple of days I just assumed I didn't get the job.

    If you feel like you need the closure I personally would feel a lot more comfortable emailing instead of calling. I would assume at this point that you didn't get the job, but I wouldn't say that in the email. I'd say something like, "I really enjoyed interviewing with your team on May 31st. I am looking for an update about the status of the job. Has this job been filled? If it has, is there any feedback you can give me for future interviews?" Alternately, you can leave that last sentence off, wait and see if you get a reply back, and if you do get a reply, reply back and ask for feedback.

    IMO, many admins aren't allowed to provide feedback per HR. They're afraid that whatever the principal says could be misconstrued as discriminatory. It doesn't hurt to ask, though. I did work for one P that did give feedback when interviewees asked.

    I would also keep in mind that not getting the job doesn't mean that you "blew" the interview. They simply felt like someone else was a better fit for their team/school. I've been on many interviews that felt really comfortable, but I ultimately didn't get the job. I've also been on the side of being the interviewer many times, and that really helped me see that more comes into play than the candidate's interview.

    We're often looking for someone that will bring new strengths to the team. For example, a few years ago when we were interviewing for my teammate one of the candidates came off as very strong, but she appeared to have all of the same strengths as me. Unfortunately for her I already worked there. We ended up hiring a candidate that we felt had the complete opposite strengths and weaknesses as me so that we could compliment each other.
     
    bella84 likes this.
  4. pommom

    pommom Comrade

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    Jun 11, 2018

    I would move on and focus on other schools. If they really wanted you and didn't want to risk losing you, they would have called by now.
    I know how you feel. I had a great interview today and would be surprised if i didn't get it.
    Keep in mind that you will have more competition at the schools with a good reputation.
     
    czacza likes this.
  5. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Companion

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    Jun 12, 2018

    Thanks! In the back of my mind, I know it doesn't mean I "blew" the interview it's just a discouraging feeling. Not hearing anything when it was one I really wanted is making me still hang on to a tiny bit or hope and faith.

    That's a good insight to how interviews operate albeit a not good way of going about it IMO. They always ask what you feel are your strengths but once you're actually in the classroom, with whatever their curriculum is, the school atomosphere, the team, the group of students, your strengths and weaknesses may change. So that lady who seemed like you in an interview just may have been your opposite as a teammate and teacher.

    I'm very what you see is what you get because I really can't act to save my life so I can't put on a persona. I just scale back my energy when need be in an interview so if that's the case then I wish the teachers had been in the interview.
     
  6. CDOR79

    CDOR79 Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2018

    I agree with the previous post- I think your best bet is an email if you need/want “closure” and a sure answer.

    Good luck!
     
    whizkid and BioAngel like this.
  7. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jun 14, 2018

    Two things jumped out at me as I read your post. In general, schools today are challenging workplaces on several levels that have been extensively discussed elsewhere - to survive, teachers must be able to work with "icky" people who often don't deserve to be called professionals. You also mentioned your inability to act to save your life and that you "can't put on a persona". Whether they are in an interview or in the classroom - like it or not - effective teachers must be able to apply affectation at times to impress their audience. Your difficulty in both of these critical areas may help explain the deleterious effect on your health and your equivocation about continuing in education.
     
    whizkid likes this.

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