Positive Behavior Management Ideas?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Pre-KPrincess, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. Pre-KPrincess

    Pre-KPrincess Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2008

    Help! I am driving myself nuts trying to come up with an innovative positive behavior system. I've done different things in the past but have never been happy with any of them... color change, sticker charts, etc. They all seem too time-consuming and complicated. I want something that is non-punitive, quick, simple, and self-managed. The only thing I can come up with that I like the best is to give the children these large plastic gems when I see them exhibiting desireable behaviors which they put in a jar or treasure box and then when it fills up the entire class gets a treat... popcorn party or something. The only thing is I'm not sure how to communicate their behavior to parents daily. I tried to take Ms. Levin's advice and forgo the systems all together but the parents seem to really harp on how their child behaved that day so I kind of feel obligated to do something. Please share your systems and how you communicate it to parents. Thanks a bunch!
     
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  3. lauriloulou

    lauriloulou Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2008

    I would explain to the parents why you are forgoing the system. It seems like a lot of work to me, and I guess I don't know how much I buy into rewarding children for behavior when it is the expectation. Problem solving is the key and that is where I want to spend my time. I think parent education on focusing on the kids rather than their behavior would also encourage them to do the same. Does that make sense? Becky Bailey's Conscious Discipline was just recommended to me and I plan to read it to help in this area as well. Good luck!
     
  4. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    I have used Conscious Discipline for 4 years now and love it!

    -I started using the program after I heard 4 boys bragging how they all got their cards switched from green to yellow together!!

    -No stickers, charts, red cards, green cards, yellow cards, class treats for good behavior.

    -It is quick, simple and totally self-managed.

    -I have no behavior reports or logs to send home.

    -It takes a me a few weeks to build the sense of community with a new class. But once things are in place, discipline is a snap.
    Last year I had a child with self-regulation problems. He started the class a month after the rest. He would act out then look for attention/approval from the class. It took a couple of weeks before he settled in. It's amazing how the class self manages. They will tell each other, "That was hurtful!" or "Stop distracting me." while on the carpet. There is also minimal tattling.

    -I love how everything is immediate and verbal and the program lets the child verbally make a choice about his own behavior.

    - The best part of the program is the sense of community. My classes are really close. By the end of the year when someone gets hurt, several children will run and ask, "Are you all right?" When a child has intentionally or unintentionally hurt someone, they will do the same.
     
  5. Pre-KPrincess

    Pre-KPrincess Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2008

    I'll have to pick up a copy of the book. In the meantime, how does it work? Is it like a reverse, positive spin on the traditional color change system? They change their color when they're making good choices? What do the colors mean? Is there a "reward" that coincides with certain colors?
     
  6. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Aug 9, 2008

    Pr-KPrincess- Conscious Disipline is an entire philosophy not just a system. I am writing this from memory. I may be leaving out a component, simplifying, or paraphrasing incorrectly.

    1. The class is a community and respectful to each other.
    2. Behaviors are either helpful or hurtful (there is no gray area)
    3. Everyone has jobs, and the teacher's job is to keep everyone
    safe.
    4. The purpose of class rules is to keep us safe.
    5. When a child needs to decompress he needs to S.T.A.R.
    Stop, Take a deep breath, and relax
    6. Children's concerns are addressed. Tattling is not ignored but
    addressed and resolutions are modeled.
    7. When a child hurts someone verbally or physically. The "hurter"
    does not just say "Sorry" and run off. The "hurter" makes sure
    the injured child is okay. The hurter is asked "Was that hurtful
    or helpful." If the child cannot answer helpful, we discuss
    the action, the antecedent and helpful ways to deal with it.
    8. The injured child is also addressed. I make sure he/she is okay
    and discuss the antecedent and ways of dealing with it.

    Here is a common example.
    When a child is being distracting on the carpet, I will stop and
    say, "James, you are distracting me and the class. When I am
    talking, what should you be doing?" James answers, "Listening."
    I'll say "James, John is missing out on the story because you
    are talking to him. Are you being hurtful or helpful?" John
    answers, "Hurtful." "How can you be helpful?" "Listen on the
    carpet." I ask, "Would you like to move to a chair so you can l i
    would you like to listen there on the carpet?" He answers, "I
    would like to listen here on the carpet." I say, "Good," and
    and continue. If this happens again, I will say, "James, I
    thought you wanted to sit and listen on the carpet.
    Why don't you move to a chair and listen there.
     
  7. Pre-KPrincess

    Pre-KPrincess Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2008

    Oh, ok, that sounds very much like how my classroom operates anyway. I guess I'm just looking for daily communication to parents about behavior and a visual/concrete "system" or better yet, a way out! They seem to be hung up on it... the first question always being "were you good today?" And I'm concerned that parents may compare notes and wonder why all of the other teacher do color/sticker charts but I don't. So it seems like the best solution is parent education. Just explaining myself.
     
  8. CarolinaTeach

    CarolinaTeach Rookie

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    Aug 9, 2008

    I have an owl theme in my classroom. This year I made a BB with a tree. Each child will have an owl picture with their name and their photo on it. All the owls will start on the ground each day. When I catch my "owls" making smart choices their owl will move up to the tree trunk and then to the leaves (this is the top level of 3). This behavior plan is visual and focuses on catching the kiddos making appropriate choice. "Owls" that are in the leaves at the end of the day will earn a sticker.
     
  9. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Aug 9, 2008

    Pre-K Princess- It sounds like you have everything handled! "If it's not broken don't fix it."

    You are right color/sticker charts are a lot of work.

    Also, some view color charts as punitive and humiliating to the child because his/her "bad" behavior is posted for all to see.
     
  10. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Aug 10, 2008

    If you feel the need to do color changes or something, I can tell you what my friend does in her classroom.

    We all have a stoplight system in our rooms here (it's mandated by our ECE dept.) Three circles, green (means you're following all the rules), yellow (warning zone) and red (stop what you're doing!). We all have 3 tagboard circles cut out in the appropriate colors and laminated (mine are attached with painters tape so that they hang like a stoplight). I write each child's name on a clothespin and they all start on the green circle every day. Misbehaviors mean that the kids have to move their clip - I make them do it themselves. The red circle has consequences attached.

    Anyway, my one teacher friend takes this one step further. In the very front of each kid's BEAR book, there is a blank monthly calendar. She uses Bingo dotters to stamp each date with the appropriate color to represent the level of behavior the child exhibited each day. She says it takes only a couple of minutes, and she does it at pack-up time as she's handing out the kids' BEAR books, anyway. A kid who has gotten to the red level has to wait until last to pack up so that he/she can have a conference about behavior with the teacher.

    In the past, she has just done the Bingo stamp on the child's hand, but she likes the calendar system better for two reasons: It provides a history of behavior issues if needed, and if a child has been absent, that space is empty, so she also has a pretty visible attendance record to present parents with. She has a population that has attendace issues.

    I haven't found a need to add the calendar aspect to my own classroom, so I don't know how much work it really involves.

    Kim
     
  11. k.contreras

    k.contreras Companion

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    Aug 10, 2008

    I too am looking for a visual for the parents (especially). I have also found that students would sometime hide their behavior sheet for the week from their parents if they had bad behavior. I like the idea of the Owl bulletin board, but I am still unsure how to show that to my parents. All the other teachers use the green/yellow/red color system but it is sooo time consuming. Anybody have any simple behavior sheets/plans they use in their class that they wouldn't mind sharing. Thanks!
     
  12. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Aug 10, 2008

    In our kindergarten room the children earn "gold coins"== play money-- and there is a prize bucket that had inexpensive prizes from oriental trading in it. Each prize cost a certain amount of "money"--all in multiples of 5 coins. the children get coins for random acts of kindness, completeing assignments without complaint, having a good behavior day etc--whatever the teacher wnats the child to improve in is rewarded. At the end of the week or month-- usually weekly at the beginning of the year and then monthly after a while--the teacher allows them to "shop"- and theycan spend their coins for prizes or save them toward a bigger prize. It really seems to work because they see others getting coins and they want one too, and it is self rewarding
     
  13. HopToad

    HopToad Rookie

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    Aug 10, 2008

    well i just want to say that i just started coming to the forum and that ive been browsing. I think that this thread has really helped me with some great ideas!! I just started at the daycare Im at and although the kids are great..the last teacher didnt really work with them, so ive needed some ideas on how to help me getting them excitied! Thanks :)
     
  14. msj

    msj Companion

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    Aug 11, 2008

    A K teacher I know sends a little note home each day that says..."Sara had .... an Excellent day today.... a fine day today.... trouble following our classroom rules." She just checks one. It also has the rules listed, and she just checks which rules the child had probelms with if she needs to. I personally don't send anything home. Some parents will ask and I just tell them, but I generally have small classes.
     
  15. tgi1515

    tgi1515 Comrade

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    Aug 11, 2008

    I do 1 2 3 Magic in my room. We practice all the classroom rules and when someone makes a poor choice I count them "that's 1", if the behavior continues I count them again "that's 2". If it continues I say "that's 3, take 4 minutes in timeout" - 1 minute for each year old. Not much comment after that. When the timer dings, they can go back to their spot, if they are ready to follow classroom procedures again. (I may try adding the helpful or hurtful vocabulary to my system to see if it works. Sounds great.)

    If a child has NOT been in timeout that day, they get some sort of happy face sticker to wear home on shirts. (I have circles and hearts with faces on them right now, but have had others):):love:

    I've told the parents to look for the sticker every day and ask about them. Occasionally, the stickers fall off, but the students usually want their parents to see them and take care of them. I send home Thursday folders and have a "behavior" check list in the front for each week. If there were problems, I check them off and make comments if necessary.

    Between the daily stickers and weekly folder, it doesn't take long to let the parents SEE the behaviors of their child.

    I do send home a note or call if there is a special problem, but it's not common.
     
  16. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Aug 11, 2008

    I use 1-2-3 when I want child to do something-- and when I need them to stop doing something I use 3-2-1. They quickly learn the difference and it usually stops them or gets them going pretty quickly.
     

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