Police involvement when students assault teachers

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Caesar753, Apr 29, 2017.

  1. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I teach in one of the largest school districts in the nation. We don't have these types of facilities to my knowledge. I've never even heard that term before.
     
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  2. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    I want to say I've stumbled across the term. Don't know how common they are. My last district had a couple of "behavior units" scattered about for geographical ease, and they pretty much just seemed to be a non-inclusive classroom for those with severe emotional/behavioral issues, but nothing terrible distinct from any other classroom.
     
  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    We do have a couple of "behavior schools" where kids go after they've been expelled from their neighborhood schools. Usually placement in a behavior school is temporary and the kid ends up back at the original school within a few months.
     
  4. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    I want to say ours weren't so much expulsion as referral and need based. Not expelled, just couldn't be in a normal classroom despite accommodations.
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    That makes sense, and it may be similar to what our district does now that I think about it.

    I assume the teachers at those schools receive additional training. I wonder how much and in what form.
     
  6. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    I agree with that. It's better than "don't report assault."
     
  7. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    A buddy taught in one. It was quite intense, an assortment of special classes.
     
  8. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Cohort

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    I understand the school to prison pipeline, but if a child assaulted me, I would not hesitate to call the police. For issues such as attendance, drugs, etc. I believe that schools and teachers must find a solution to allow kids to stay in school.

    I am going to student teach at low-income school with a majority of students of color. If a student assaulted me (or another student!) and my admin not call the police in fear of ruining a child's life, I would throw a fit. Teachers need to be able to go to their jobs like anyone else-- knowing that if someone assaults them, the police will handle it. If teachers are expected to just "handle it", I would leave in a heartbeat.
     
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  9. MrTempest

    MrTempest Companion

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    I agree police need to be involved when students are engaged in criminal acts at school. Sweeping it under the rug does not teach kids life lessons that their actions have consequences. Additionally, I have taught in two districts with very different practices when involving the police. At the school were police were less likely to be involved you saw a lot more fighting and kids doing drugs at school. In an environment like that a tone is set that students can do stupid things and get away with; over and over again.
     
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  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Cohort

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    Yes, but there is a balance because we do not want these kids to go to jail instead of school.
     
  11. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    However, giving kids the impression criminal behavior will be tolerated pretty much guarantees the school-to-prison pipeline. These kids get mixed signals, get into the adult world, and realize that no, society will not tolerate crime.

    By all means, add preventive strategies to stop the behavior, but don't take away the consequence.
     
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  12. msleep

    msleep Rookie

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    A lot of this has to do with parents wanting their children in inclusion classes. Each student's situation is different, but this is putting a strain on the teachers. There are also more students with disabilities being labeled and it puts a financial strain on the districts.
     
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  13. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    We have school resource officers (SRO) on every campus for various reason. It really isn't a bad system. I think it is more in case someone comes on campus that shouldn't than who is supposed to be on campus. But anyway. If students were to assault a teacher, yes the SRO would be called. More than likely, I would press charges.
     
  14. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    If a small child, perhaps kindergarten age, were to attack me, I'd likely just call someone to take the child away. Or let the child know in no uncertain terms the behavior would not be tolerated. I can be convincing. It's happened. I know it will happen again. I do not feel threatened by someone just three feet tall, and don't see the need to blow such a situation out of proportion. After all, we have a number of emotionally handicapped children in my school. I can be understanding enough not to make their situation worse when the threat isn't substantial, after all.

    If an older child attacked me, someone large enough to pose some threat, I would press charges, and the administration could go to hell.

    If an older child attacked me, and I felt a genuine threat to my personal safety, I would take any and all steps necessary to defend myself.

    I will not allow anyone to hurt me. Will. Not. Happen.
     
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  15. anon55

    anon55 Comrade

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    How are the interests of anyone else served by not reporting an assault to the police? Teachers are expected to be like Jesus and turn the other cheek to abuse? Low pay is not enough of a sacrifice? Think about it. The kid doing the assault needs to get some consequences now so that they don't continue down that path and get worse. The rest of the class and the teacher deserve a safe environment, period.
     
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  16. anon55

    anon55 Comrade

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    Agreed, but the balance has gone WAY too far in the direction of leniency. I'm sure every person on this site can tell a story of a student whose behavior is out of control and not enough is done about it and it just keeps getting worse. If a student lays their hands on me, I'm pressing charges. No question about it. Being assaulted or harassed is not in my job description and I wouldn't care if any admin pressured me not to press charges.
     
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  17. RussianBlueMommy

    RussianBlueMommy Comrade

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    I have yet to reveal this on here, but I have 100% first-hand experience with this. A couple of months ago I was working in the "worst of the worst", (I work at a Continuation/DAEP School) and was in the "ISO" (isolation room), it's like the ISS for the disciplinary school. Anyway, this kid was outside the door disrupting class and I asked him to stop. He pinned me, between door and frame- bruised my knee and ribs. He now has Aggravated assault against a public servant charges pending. I go to court soon...

    So YES, I filed charges against the little felon. He needs to learn, and would be doing him a disservice to just let it go. I was physically assaulted and injured.

    Admin is AMAZING and in fact has been with me through the whole process. The principal even went so far as getting me all the info I need (name, address, etc) for the report. They paid me for days off, and will pay me on my court day. I'm very blessed to be with this group of admin & supportive teachers.

    Yes, involve the police especially with older ones. If it's intentional and deliberate, this kid was 14 and had prior issues and probation officer. He needs to go away for a long, long time. But he won't.

    Teachers should be able to feel safe in work, and I didn't feel safe for awhile after that.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2017
  18. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    The association does not just work for the teachers; a violent student is a danger to everyone, including other students.
     
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  19. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    I think it depends on the area. We have more parents begging for betyer services than we do those begging for inclusion. The disability and services also hss a lot to do with what a parent asks for. If yhe pull out services are no better than glorified baby sitting for certain disabilities the parents beg for inclusion.
     
  20. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    There's a case in my neck of the woods involving attempted murder by teenagers. Currently the court is deciding whether to keep them in juvenile or push them to adult court.

    What's interesting and applicable here is that one of the arguments being made for one of the boys is that his ADHD affected his ability to judge the situation and make the right choice (this was planned and premeditated murder attempt, but hey). Therefore staying in the juvenile system would be best for him.

    I do realize there is an awful lot of ADHD or autistic people in prison.

    No real conclusion I'm making here, just sharing some musings.
     

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