PD for veteran teachers

Discussion in 'General Education' started by swansong1, Jul 7, 2016.

  1. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    Jul 9, 2016

    OK, now I am wondering what is Home Brewing. I guess I need to do some research!
     
  2. phillyteacher

    phillyteacher Comrade

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    Jul 9, 2016

    I am not really a veteran teacher (going into my fourth year) but I am always looking for content-specific PD - seems like that's harder to find around here.
     
  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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  4. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jul 9, 2016

    Think BEER. Not exactly a great idea for an actual PD, but it sounds like a fun class to me.
     
  5. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Jul 9, 2016

    I think even this would be a helpful PD - ipads *can* be simple, but there are lots of ways to make an ipad and apple TV really useful for teaching that may be more complicated for non-techy teachers. Using them for interactives similarly to a smart board would be helpful; I'm sure there are apps for ipads that work almost the same as a smartboard (though without the large screen interaction).
     
  6. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jul 10, 2016

    Thanks for all the ideas...especially home brewing!!! Too bad it's a religious school that frowns upon that kind of thing :(
     
  7. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Jul 10, 2016

    I think you could use home brewing as an analogy, don't you? All the ingredients not only have to be present, but they must be there in the correct amounts. Then you must provide the right conditions, or nothing happens, and there is always a period of trial and error as the person brewing becomes more confident with the rules and process, finally allowing for more creativity and exploration within the guidelines. Now, I'm not sure you can sell this to your school, but maybe those 3 experienced staff members could take this "training" together. If you can write it up and make correlations to teaching, the school just might pay for the training!
     
  8. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jul 10, 2016

    That's certainly worth a shot!
     
  9. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    Jul 10, 2016

    I was thinking beer but thought that it was something new that I had not heard about. L guess I was really focusing on PD, that one went over my head!:dizzyxx::dizzyxx:
     
  10. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Jul 10, 2016

    Something to think about is PD which is "training" and PD which is "exposure". Exposure type PD is usually a couple hours listening to a person talk about the latest craze related to a specific topic or in general. Handouts are usually provided. Sometimes participants are asked to "do" something with the materials. There is no follow-through, continuation, or on-site coaching/review beyond the initial meeting. Participants are expected to remember what was presented, often months later, then apply it flawlessly into their teaching. An example is a PD meeting I recall advertised as "training" in which the district sent a couple trainers to teach staff how to navigate the desktop when computers were being assigned to classrooms (showing my age here). At least half the staff did not have home computers at the time and majority who had them in their rooms never used them. The training lasted two hours. There was, perhaps, at minimum, 10-15 "skills" demonstrated in rapid fashion (one practice each) to a room full of teachers afraid to pick up the thing in front of them because it was called a "mouse". After the presenters left the most common comment from teachers was, "What was that all about?"

    In short, the topic of PD is certainly important and may initially grab participants. Whether that "grab" is worthwhile, long lasting and leaves participants the feeling of wanting more will depend, for the most part, on the skills of the presenter. There is nothing wrong with exposure type PD as long as participants are aware that's what it is - exposure - and not training.
     
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  11. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Jul 10, 2016

    That is a good distinction, Loomistrout. IMO, I think veteran teachers and myself in particular benefit more from exposure PD than training. For example, I want to be exposed to different POVs, strategies..etc on a system for giving students feedback, as a professional I want freedom to choose, combine, implement what I learned that would best suit my classroom.

    Trainings on the other hand are less about thinking and learning to be a better teacher and are more about compliance and implementation. My experience is when a district has PD trainings, that is now a program that is mandatory in your classroom.
     

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