PBIS

Discussion in 'General Education' started by YoungTeacherGuy, Aug 27, 2017.

  1. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Aficionado

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    Aug 27, 2017

    Is your school involved in PBIS? If so, to what extent? How's the buy in from teachers, students, and parents?

    Just curious how other districts are doing in terms of PBIS.
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    My current school does not, but the school I student taught at did. I see a lot of bad reviews of PBIS on here, but at the schools where I've seen it used (at least two), it's been fairly successful. Staff and students liked it, and it was no big deal in its implementation. Basically it was run in addition to what classroom management systems teachers were already using, not instead of. Teachers were able to have consequences and rules of their own choosing, but they also gave out tickets for good behavior, especially at recess and lunch.

    Where I student taught, they had assemblies once a month. Teachers chose goals for their classes for the month. For example: This month, we will have a clean classroom floor at the end of at least 15 school days; we will use please and thank you when talking to each other. Sometimes it was very measurable, sometimes it was more subjective. Classes who met their goal were able to spin a wheel for a prize, such as: wear a hat day, bubble gum in class, pajama day. These assemblies were also a time for students-of-the-month to be recognized. Sometimes student leaders in the older grades acted out short plays on character skills such as being kind to others or not bullying. They were fun and positive assemblies.
     
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  4. Sab

    Sab Companion

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    It is, as was the last school I did my student teaching at. I feel like PBIS is pretty vague and can be implemented in different ways...I do believe students need to be explicitly taught how to behave appropriately and all that. I don't believe in rewarding students for doing what they're expected to do. I believe in holding all students to high expectations and think that rewarding them for basic appropriate behavior undermines that and can be detrimental to their self-esteem the same way other meaningless praise can.
    I also don't believe in bribing students to behave or negotiating with them in an attempt to get them to behave well. They should know they're expected to behave appropriately, and if not, there will be a consequence. So I basically choose not to hand out the "reward bucks" the school uses in my own class, though students know they can trade unused bathroom passes in for them at the end of the quarter. Other teachers may use them more, but that's up to them.
     
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  5. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    All of the schools I've ever worked in (including the 10 or so schools I did field placements in during college) have been PBIS schools. I didn't realize it was an option to not do PBIS until I read about it being "new" to some schools on here.

    I started at my current school 5 years ago. We had the supposed "common language" for behavior expectations, but over the past several years we've gotten further and further away from that in favor of giving each teacher freedom to do their own thing. I can see wanting to do that as a classroom teacher, but as someone who works with multiple grade levels, it's difficult when everyone is not on the same page. We used to have a "paw" system that we used for rewards. Kids would turn them in for water bottles, t shirts, etc. The prizes were the same every year and the kids didn't seem phased by that at all. I honestly was very (pleasantly) surprised by how much kids bought into wanting to get the paws, even in the intermediate grades.

    The great majority of teachers did use the paws, but there wasn't a lot of buy in for the system as a whole. We have tons and tons of severe behaviors and we keep hearing about how consequences aren't effective. We have a new P and AP this year and teachers were really hoping that would change. One of the first things our new P said was that research shows consequences don't change behavior.

    We have new "common language" and "common expectations" this year and our admin has been making sure it's been enforced across the building. I honestly can't believe the difference it's made already. I'm certainly not complaining, but especially given the severity of our behavior problems before, I can't believe how well the kids are buying into it especially because there aren't really consequences in place to keep them from not following the expectations. I've always taught with my door closed because the hallway has always been a zoo, but this year it is truly silent. We're only 3 weeks in, so I'm wondering if we'll see more issues later as kids realize there isn't really anything keeping them from doing whatever they want. We've also switched from "paws" to "tickets"- kids earn the tickets and then there is a drawing each Friday with one winner from each class. This means the average kid will win 1 time per year (if that)- I'm also wondering if the excitement for the tickets/drawings will wear off once the kids realize the prizes aren't guaranteed like they were before.
     
  6. Teacherhere

    Teacherhere Companion

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    I worked at a school that used PBIS and it was not popular by the teachers. The parents did not understand it. I felt students were confused on what was expected. Administrators seem to love it because it removes a big burden off their shoulders to not exceed these disciplinary numbers. Then they go dancing around patting themselves on the back because expulsions and suspensions are down when in reality they have done nothing more than lower the standards. It seems to be a system to put the blinders on and ignore the reality of the extent of problems facing schools.
     
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  7. a2z

    a2z Phenom

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    If teachers did not like it they probably didn't buy into it making it a system that wasn't really implemented.
     
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  8. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I have seen the system implemented both positively and negatively.
    The entire staff must buy in to help the program succeed. Some teachers react negatively because they feel they must change classroom behavior plans that have worked for them. Many administrators seem to think the plan is their opportunity to shove discipline problems on the teachers. PBIS does not solve all woes, very often it just adds too many layers of interventions before actually dealing with a definite problem.
     
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  9. Teacherhere

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    I agree, and by doing this what is the point? Why do it? District politics?
     
  10. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    Setting expectations, creating a school culture to meet expectations, supporting kids to meet those expectations all sound good to me.

    Its sad to know that sometimes adults can be a bigger impediment to success than students. I realize we are all overburdened by inititives that come and go, but PBSIS is an easy thing to do.
     
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  11. Teacherhere

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    What if a teacher already has those bases covered on their own? Would you still force PBIS on them?
     
  12. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    If an entire school is moving toward a common theme how else would you expect me to answer this question?
     
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  13. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    I'd make the case that PBIS would then just be a simpler transition for the teacher, but still important as it's not just about the underlying principles but coordinating the specifics across the school - for example, how do bus drivers and cafeteria workers respond to behavioral incidents? How do administrators respond to escalated classroom behavioral incidents? Somehow these things need to be coordinated. PBIS isn't the only way to do it, but simply having a great classroom-level system doesn't do it either.
     
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  14. Backroads

    Backroads Enthusiast

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    We just started it. I have heard stories (one of my friends uses it at her school and they have to have parent volunteers all the time watching the kids and handing out tickets just to stay "consistent" on awarding good behaviors), but I'm trying to be positive.

    All we have done so far is set up very specific expectations for everywhere in the school. I'm just fine with this.

    But I don't think I could handle having to stop my lesson just to hand out tickets or buy prizes I can't afford.
     
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  15. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Sounds as though different school systems experience varying levels of success, owing to the way PBIS is implemented.

    I've seen PBIS used to shower proper behavior with rewards while negative behavior is either ignored or pacified with rewards. I suppose consequences were being put on a back shelf that teachers and administrators could focus more time begging wayward children to control themselves to even the slightest degree. "Have some candy because you did not hit anyone today!" is the direction I've seen PBIS lead us. On paper, administrators can claim discipline is improved, but only because less is being documented. All of which is to say I doubt I've ever seen PBIS (or any discipline system) implemented well.

    I cannot fathom children saying please and thank you. Must be nice to work someplace like that.
     
  16. Teacherhere

    Teacherhere Companion

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    PBIS is a politically correct system that lowers the standards for kids then compares them equally to that of more affluent areas. Districts love this "equity not equality" phrase. I personally think it is garbage.
     
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  17. Teacherhere

    Teacherhere Companion

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  18. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    PBSIS is just a tiered system for social and emotional learning.

    For example, I heard a number of things above about prizes and rewards. That's not a requirement.

    Here is our state initiative website: http://www.njpbs.org/index.html
     
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  19. a2z

    a2z Phenom

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    That is common place in our local schools. Even those students called "entitled" or "problems" use manners most of the time.

    The funny thing is no matter how good a school is and how good the kids are, the negative is the focus and always extremely bad. The difference is in some schools bad is being assaulted on a steady basis and in another the horrid students forgot to write their name on the paper.
     
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  20. Teacherhere

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    I am just glad the military doesn't use a PBIS type system. We would have a bunch of nancy boys walking around.
     
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  21. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    So schools should function like the military?
     

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