PBIS

Discussion in 'General Education' started by YoungTeacherGuy, Aug 27, 2017.

  1. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Aficionado

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    Is your school involved in PBIS? If so, to what extent? How's the buy in from teachers, students, and parents?

    Just curious how other districts are doing in terms of PBIS.
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    My current school does not, but the school I student taught at did. I see a lot of bad reviews of PBIS on here, but at the schools where I've seen it used (at least two), it's been fairly successful. Staff and students liked it, and it was no big deal in its implementation. Basically it was run in addition to what classroom management systems teachers were already using, not instead of. Teachers were able to have consequences and rules of their own choosing, but they also gave out tickets for good behavior, especially at recess and lunch.

    Where I student taught, they had assemblies once a month. Teachers chose goals for their classes for the month. For example: This month, we will have a clean classroom floor at the end of at least 15 school days; we will use please and thank you when talking to each other. Sometimes it was very measurable, sometimes it was more subjective. Classes who met their goal were able to spin a wheel for a prize, such as: wear a hat day, bubble gum in class, pajama day. These assemblies were also a time for students-of-the-month to be recognized. Sometimes student leaders in the older grades acted out short plays on character skills such as being kind to others or not bullying. They were fun and positive assemblies.
     
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  4. Sab

    Sab Companion

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    It is, as was the last school I did my student teaching at. I feel like PBIS is pretty vague and can be implemented in different ways...I do believe students need to be explicitly taught how to behave appropriately and all that. I don't believe in rewarding students for doing what they're expected to do. I believe in holding all students to high expectations and think that rewarding them for basic appropriate behavior undermines that and can be detrimental to their self-esteem the same way other meaningless praise can.
    I also don't believe in bribing students to behave or negotiating with them in an attempt to get them to behave well. They should know they're expected to behave appropriately, and if not, there will be a consequence. So I basically choose not to hand out the "reward bucks" the school uses in my own class, though students know they can trade unused bathroom passes in for them at the end of the quarter. Other teachers may use them more, but that's up to them.
     
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  5. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    All of the schools I've ever worked in (including the 10 or so schools I did field placements in during college) have been PBIS schools. I didn't realize it was an option to not do PBIS until I read about it being "new" to some schools on here.

    I started at my current school 5 years ago. We had the supposed "common language" for behavior expectations, but over the past several years we've gotten further and further away from that in favor of giving each teacher freedom to do their own thing. I can see wanting to do that as a classroom teacher, but as someone who works with multiple grade levels, it's difficult when everyone is not on the same page. We used to have a "paw" system that we used for rewards. Kids would turn them in for water bottles, t shirts, etc. The prizes were the same every year and the kids didn't seem phased by that at all. I honestly was very (pleasantly) surprised by how much kids bought into wanting to get the paws, even in the intermediate grades.

    The great majority of teachers did use the paws, but there wasn't a lot of buy in for the system as a whole. We have tons and tons of severe behaviors and we keep hearing about how consequences aren't effective. We have a new P and AP this year and teachers were really hoping that would change. One of the first things our new P said was that research shows consequences don't change behavior.

    We have new "common language" and "common expectations" this year and our admin has been making sure it's been enforced across the building. I honestly can't believe the difference it's made already. I'm certainly not complaining, but especially given the severity of our behavior problems before, I can't believe how well the kids are buying into it especially because there aren't really consequences in place to keep them from not following the expectations. I've always taught with my door closed because the hallway has always been a zoo, but this year it is truly silent. We're only 3 weeks in, so I'm wondering if we'll see more issues later as kids realize there isn't really anything keeping them from doing whatever they want. We've also switched from "paws" to "tickets"- kids earn the tickets and then there is a drawing each Friday with one winner from each class. This means the average kid will win 1 time per year (if that)- I'm also wondering if the excitement for the tickets/drawings will wear off once the kids realize the prizes aren't guaranteed like they were before.
     
  6. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    If teachers did not like it they probably didn't buy into it making it a system that wasn't really implemented.
     
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  7. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I have seen the system implemented both positively and negatively.
    The entire staff must buy in to help the program succeed. Some teachers react negatively because they feel they must change classroom behavior plans that have worked for them. Many administrators seem to think the plan is their opportunity to shove discipline problems on the teachers. PBIS does not solve all woes, very often it just adds too many layers of interventions before actually dealing with a definite problem.
     
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  8. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Setting expectations, creating a school culture to meet expectations, supporting kids to meet those expectations all sound good to me.

    Its sad to know that sometimes adults can be a bigger impediment to success than students. I realize we are all overburdened by inititives that come and go, but PBSIS is an easy thing to do.
     
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  9. AlwaysAttend

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    If an entire school is moving toward a common theme how else would you expect me to answer this question?
     
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  10. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    I'd make the case that PBIS would then just be a simpler transition for the teacher, but still important as it's not just about the underlying principles but coordinating the specifics across the school - for example, how do bus drivers and cafeteria workers respond to behavioral incidents? How do administrators respond to escalated classroom behavioral incidents? Somehow these things need to be coordinated. PBIS isn't the only way to do it, but simply having a great classroom-level system doesn't do it either.
     
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  11. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    We just started it. I have heard stories (one of my friends uses it at her school and they have to have parent volunteers all the time watching the kids and handing out tickets just to stay "consistent" on awarding good behaviors), but I'm trying to be positive.

    All we have done so far is set up very specific expectations for everywhere in the school. I'm just fine with this.

    But I don't think I could handle having to stop my lesson just to hand out tickets or buy prizes I can't afford.
     
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  12. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Sounds as though different school systems experience varying levels of success, owing to the way PBIS is implemented.

    I've seen PBIS used to shower proper behavior with rewards while negative behavior is either ignored or pacified with rewards. I suppose consequences were being put on a back shelf that teachers and administrators could focus more time begging wayward children to control themselves to even the slightest degree. "Have some candy because you did not hit anyone today!" is the direction I've seen PBIS lead us. On paper, administrators can claim discipline is improved, but only because less is being documented. All of which is to say I doubt I've ever seen PBIS (or any discipline system) implemented well.

    I cannot fathom children saying please and thank you. Must be nice to work someplace like that.
     
  13. AlwaysAttend

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    PBSIS is just a tiered system for social and emotional learning.

    For example, I heard a number of things above about prizes and rewards. That's not a requirement.

    Here is our state initiative website: http://www.njpbs.org/index.html
     
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  14. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    That is common place in our local schools. Even those students called "entitled" or "problems" use manners most of the time.

    The funny thing is no matter how good a school is and how good the kids are, the negative is the focus and always extremely bad. The difference is in some schools bad is being assaulted on a steady basis and in another the horrid students forgot to write their name on the paper.
     
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  15. AlwaysAttend

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    So schools should function like the military?
     
  16. AlwaysAttend

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    Should we have them clean the floor with toothbrushes when they don't meet those expectations? Last I checked, that's corporal punishment.
     
  17. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I disagree. There's a price to pay for everything. Sometimes the price is cheap, like everyone adopting a common theme and language. Other times, the price is too high.
     
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  18. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    That would be more effective and yield better fruit than what we have now.
     
  19. AlwaysAttend

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    What's wrong with the fruit we produce now? Are todays children any worse academically than the students we produced 50 years ago or are they just assessed differently? (I honestly don't know enough to answer this).

    Or are you speaking behaviorally? That problem is more attributable to parenting than school discipline.
     
  20. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Companion

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    Military discipline might be good. Not in all cases, but a kid who vandalizes the school should be expected to clean it off and make the repairs. I have yet to see PBIS work well. I believe we need to have expectations, but at the high school level, kids should know that the expectation is to come to class and behave appropriately.
     
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  21. AlwaysAttend

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    Other countries are setting the bar higher on scoring well on tests. These students don't always do well in their new environment. There have been articles written about these students seeking out professional companies to edit or write their papers.

    There have also been articles written about a lack of creativity and that China was actually looking to the American education system to foster this skill.

    No country is perfect in how it prepares and there are positives and negatives with every solution.
     
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  22. AlwaysAttend

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    Should know and actually understand are two different things.

    The types of problems you see in school are equated to the population you teach. I work in an upper middle class district at this time and the bathroom sink was ripped off the wall at least 4 times last year. Clearly they should know that's wrong, but do they understand that maintainace will need to repair this and the taxpayers will need to fund the repairs?

    This has nothing to do with PBSIS.
     
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  23. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    China has been trying to Americanize its education system for decades as, while they certainly testing high, the results don't match the efforts. Compare runner-up Finland and their educational values.

    China has to fight thousands of years of culture. We don't have that.
     
  24. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    I've never worked in a US school so my viewpoint may be limited, but if I was to theorize about what might be worth changing, it wouldn't be militarizing schools. I would say it might be worth considering less standardized tests, less scripted curriculum and ensuring that teacher evaluations are not tied to things like test scores.
     
  25. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    I've worked in 3 different places, none had scripted curriculums. School districts don't want to pay for them. Most pay their teachers to write curriculum in my area.

    It's hard to say we need less standardized tests. They take it once per year in most grade levels. They don't force you to teach to it, I've never worked in a school that did. Just a few weeks of questions formatted like they might see and teaching how to use testing tools.
     
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  26. Always__Learning

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    As I said, "worth considering." While you may not work in a state that uses scripted curriculum, it seems far more common in the US that in other nations that score higher. I really can't imagine why standardized testing would need to happen once per year. Moreover, in some states scores on standaridzed tests impact things like teacher evaluations and salaries so teachers do feel pressured to "teach to it". So again, not be all and end all, but "worth considering."
     
  27. AlwaysAttend

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    It allows us to determine what schools/states prepare students better than others as education decisions are made at the local level in most cases.
     
  28. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    AlwaysAttend, I actually don't believe in comparing schools/states to each other. I do believe in comparing schools to a standard we want schools to achieve. I think that standardized tests are necessary to evaluate schools. I am not convinced that justifies annual tests. In most Canadian provinces, students participate in standardized tests a few times during their K-12 education rather than annually and I do think that is sufficient to evaluate schools.
     
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