Paying for your own sub?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by blazer, May 11, 2019.

  1. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    I don't entirely understand this.

    It seems to me that it's the equivalent of taking days off without pay.

    At my school, we get X number of paid sick days. If we go over that number, we can take additional time off without pay. That is, they'd calculate what I make daily, and subtract that daily amount from my salary. That's the same thing, more or less, is it not? Only difference is that they are told what that amount is that will be deducted daily.

    My heart goes out to that teacher, however most jobs would work this way.
     
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  4. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Actually, when you think about it that way, the teacher would actually earn money...while most of us just lose all of our daily pay when we go over our sick days (as otterpop said), this teacher is only losing the equivalent of the sub pay and retaining the rest of her daily rate. So, she actually comes out ahead.

    Just playing devil's advocate here...I absolutely think she should not have to worry about this issue while she is recovering. That is just cruel.
     
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  5. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    I can see why it seemed a good idea at the time, and in many ways it's rather appealing. I think this case highlights the more dramatic consequences.

    If I had the power for the district, I'd have set up some sort of catastrophic event plan to hang around for such events. Every place I've worked at had sick leave banks. Not always perfect, but useful.

    It sucks for the teacher, but with budgets being what they are, I can't think of a better option other than quitting or the theoretical catastrophe benefit not in place.

    I've heard lore of teachers paying for the sub no matter the situation or the number of sick days, and if that's true I feel worse for them.
     
  6. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    That is normal here. If you go over your allotted sick days/personal days, then you don’t get paid for that day. It is essentially paying for your sub.
     
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  7. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I think this teacher actually got a really good deal. Anywhere else that I've heard of, if you run out of sick days, you're not getting paid at all. The sub is going to make far less daily than the teacher does, so she's still getting whatever the leftover pay is, even though she's not working. For me, this would mean I would still be netting at least $2,000 per month. I think it's actually generous of the district to allow that.
     
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  8. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    :yeahthat:
     
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  9. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    We are docked our daily rate if out of days. The sub pay is taken out of that amount. I assume the district banks the balance.

    We do have a program where people can donate days, so I doubt it gets to that point often.
     
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  10. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Only in America does getting a disease like cancer have to equal a financial catastrophe. Honestly, I have a pretty thick skin, but a few of the answers here are actually a little gross to read.
     
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  11. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Wow I never realised you were so hard done by. In the UK we get 6 months sick leave on full pay them another 6 months on half pay.
     
  12. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    I didn't realize that. I know the health care system here is terribly expensive and backwards, but the job side of things never crossed my mind. It never occurred to me that not having months of sick leave in the event of serious illness was uncommon, even if there are better alternatives.

    That said, my husband and I have specifically held off on starting a family because of horrible and scarcely existing maternity leave policies. That topic really gets me heated, fast.
     
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  13. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    The life of having non-socialized care.

    I lean conservative-ish, but I like the idea of socialized medicine. Preferably a system that still allows for optional private care as needed, as people in my groups for my daughter's condition say they get subpar treatment for the disease without a private option.
     
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  14. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Socialized medicine sounds nice in theory, but in practice it is a disaster. It also stifles innovation and medical advances — the vast majority of medical breakthroughs came from places like the US where there are free markets.

    Countries like Canada and the UK have huge waiting lists for emergency care and patients are coming to the US in a lot of cases to get the care they need because they aren’t getting it in their country of origin.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2019
  15. Geologygirl

    Geologygirl Comrade

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    My district is exactly the same. The problem comes if you are a new teacher and at the bottom of the pay scale. In order to keep your medical insurance and retirement ect you may have to start paying the district money to keep medical insurance, since they deduct taxes, retirement/pension payments and, other fees first thens they deduct sub pay. Sometimes that comes out to more than they are paid in a month....especially when paying long term subs which cost more than short term ones.... In California teachers cant pay into state disability so if they want disability coverage they have to apply for that and pay for it monthly as well.... Imagine having to pay your place of employment from your savings because you missed too many days to cover the sub and you owe them more than you are paid.
     
  16. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    I once had a coworker at a non-profit who was transferring money over for insurance...

    On an insurance tangent, I may have messed up my district's insurance for them...
     
  17. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    This is what happens in my district- they deduct sub pay from teacher’s paycheck once sick days are depleted. I have 156 sick days on the books and would love to donate a few to a colleague in need but that’s not allowed.
     
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  18. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    We are allowed to donate sick days as long as we don’t drop ours below 15. I have donated days to coworkers with terminally ill spouses, parents, or children. I haven’t donated in the past few years since my mom is sick.
     
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  19. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    As I see it, their only complaint should be their union negotiated inability to have short term disability and long term disability policies. But if on average the teacher makes 82,000 a year, having to pay the sub at 200/day still give the teacher 50-60% of their pay which is on-par with most short term disability policies.

    As others have said, most times when you are out of personal and sick days, you get paid nothing for the day. Seems they have it better than most, especially since there is a sick bank they can pull from.
     
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  20. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Yep.
     
  21. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    This is what my district did. First we had a sick leave bank you could use if you were in bad shape and out of days. We all would donate a day,. IF It ever emptied we donated another. The last few years the gave that up and then sent out an email asking for donations. I donated a long time cause I had so much. More to close colleagues........I liked the old bank better.
     

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