Out of state applications...need some advice.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by NewSoCalTeacher2017, Jan 19, 2018.

  1. NewSoCalTeacher2017

    NewSoCalTeacher2017 Rookie

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    Jan 19, 2018

    Hi everyone,

    I'm not having any luck landing a position locally and I'm willing to expand my search to other places in my state as well as other states. Does anyone have any advice on doing this? What was the process like?

    Thanks
     
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  3. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Jan 19, 2018

    Are you on edjoin? That’s your best bet for California.
     
  4. NewSoCalTeacher2017

    NewSoCalTeacher2017 Rookie

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    Jan 19, 2018

    Yeah. I'm going to expand my search but there are so few openings in my area.
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jan 19, 2018

    Yes, I did this. The job market in my hometown was awful. I would advise picking one or two states that you're willing to move to and then getting your teaching license for those states. IME you won't be taken seriously as an out of state candidate unless you have that state's license in hand. It is a small amount of extra money to pay up front, but worth it when you consider how much better your chances of getting a job will be.

    I moved across the country for my first job right out of college. I figured if I hated it, I could try for jobs in my home state again the next year, this time with experience on my resume. I actually loved it! I've been here for 8 years now and wouldn't dream of going back.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    Jan 20, 2018

    If you don't want to go so far as to acquire the other state's license, at least make sure that you have passed the correct teacher exams for that state. I'm not picking on Texas, but they accept few Praxis exams, and they expect you to come to their state to take their state exams. If you want to teach there, you should go and pass their tests if you are seriously considering applications there. In reality, once you pass the Texas teacher exams, you may as well go ahead and apply for their license, because the DOE has already vetted your transcript, you've passed the test, so all that is left to do is pay for the certificate. Let me be honest - my son did all of that, and he still wasn't taken seriously, despite having attended school in the Midwest. If the state you are considering,uses Prasix exams, at least make sure you have passed the exams with scores that will meet that state's requirements. Be willing to actually show up for interviews in person should they be interested in you. Skype is nice, but doesn't show the commitment that an in person interview will convey. There is expense it that, but I think it is worth that.

    Understand that you will be more marketable with certificates that are not readily available from the local applicant pool;. IMHO, that means if you want to teach elementary classes, it will help if you have "something special", such as ESL, SPED, specialized science or math certificates in the secondary level, or other specialties that are harder to find. You can't blame them - some types of applicant's are a dime a dozen, so you need "something special" to be worth the interview. This means investing time into additional education to meet qualifications for these certificates. In reality, you may become more marketable in your own area once you have those certificates. I am familiar with out of state hunts, as my son applied out of state. It was only when he earned the ESL MEd that he was successful, and going to the state to interview seemed to seal the deal. I should add that he earned many more interviews in state once he had finished that masters. I have a certificate in ESL and SPED, and the applicants who wanted to teach elementary school were still struggling, but they were hoping that the SPED certificate might be the golden ticket. I did chuckle, however, when they earned the SPED certificate, but then told the district that although they had the endorsement, they really didn't want to teach it. They wondered why have that endorsement didn't seem to help in the job search. :rolleyes: Just an observation worth noting.

    Best of luck - you are close to some states that need teachers, but mostly they need the same kind of endorsements I have mentioned above. Once you have enough skills or education to fill hard to fill spots, the interviews increase.
     
  7. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Mar 3, 2018

    I taught in two different states. Was very surprised to learn that CA has a reciprocal license standard with many states. You may want to find this out before hoping around. That will save you time & money because you may be able to get off a plane and sub or teach the next week! Some states have testing sites right in your hometown! But your real questions are what you want in a new home. A great job will mean nothing if your area has high taxes, expensive property and auto insurance, few social services - even a local library with good hours. Don't visit as a tourist, go as a vacationer who lives there. Can you readily find what you have or want to have now? Are you trying to copy your childhood home or start off brand new? Be bold and daring, or timid and play it safe. Do you feel comfortable in small towns or big cities. And let's not start with the weather, but hey...every place out there has it's ups and downs. So it's not just a job, it's a life you are changing.
     
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  8. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Mar 4, 2018

    K12Jobspot is a good source.
    Keep your options open, but keep up your guard as well. Non-profit, charter and private schools may be more flexible, but have their own challenges. Be wary of any school with several openings, or has terms such as, "restructuring" or "turnaround" in the posting. These schools may have good starting salaries, but could be very difficult for new teachers. Additionally, you need to be prepared to go into some areas you might not be accustomed to or familiar with. Look at the whole picture. You'll be coming in early, working through lunch and staying late - and don't forget nights for conferences. You want a commute that is comfortable, and not traumatizing, or terrifying. Circle the block three different times in the day and night. Is there anything that makes you feel unsafe, it's not worth the salary or stress. Unless you are up for the challenge, and you have my support.
     
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  9. heatherberm

    heatherberm Comrade

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    Mar 4, 2018

    I was in this position a few years ago. In my experience, most states with high need will give you a year to get your certification in line with theirs - take any missing tests or trainings, etc. - but I agree with those who have said that beginning the process in one or two states you're really interested in makes a difference and shows that you're serious about potentially relocating. I never got as far as actually completing a certification for any other states (I ended up getting an offer out of my area but still in my state), but I was able to say that I'd submitted an application for certification and was in the process of getting my requirements audited, etc. and I believe it absolutely made them take me a bit more serious. I would also make an effort to find and go to a teacher recruitment in that area. I went to a few and they're definitely a mixed bag but again, it just shows a level of commitment and if you do get face-to-face with someone, it can make a difference. I left 2 job fairs with job offers for the following year.
     
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