One-on-one aides

Discussion in 'General Education' started by YoungTeacherGuy, Feb 14, 2018.

  1. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Feb 14, 2018

    One-on-one aides for gen ed students with severe behavioral needs are becoming very common in my district. It seems like each year, students' behaviors are getting worse, unfortunately. At my last site, we had 5 different one-on-one aides who shadowed students all day long. Thankfully, at my current site, we only have one aide who does this.

    As a district, though, each site has between 1-5 aides who do nothing but follow around students who could potentially cause a safety issue.

    When I first started my career in education 12 (almost 13) years ago, I'd never heard of this type of thing. Doesn't seem like the behaviors were as intense back then. Sigh!
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 14, 2018

    If a student's behaviors are so egregious that he needs a 1:1 aide, I wonder why he wouldn't meet the criteria for an IEP. I've never heard of a gen ed student having a 1:1 aide.
     
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  4. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Feb 14, 2018

    Same here. We have no gen ed kids with a 1-on-1 aide, but plenty of spec ed children in that field.
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Some of them are on an IEP--some aren't, though.

    The student at my site with a 1:1 is super bright (no speech/language issues and academically above average). He's just incredibly volatile and leaves class whenever he has a meltdown (he even hopped the fence once and left campus).

    We had one kid last year who would flip desks, bite kids, and do other out of control things. We were told that he wasn't severe enough to go to the ED class, though, so we had to continue documenting and jumping through hoops. I'm no longer at that site, but I heard that they finally got him into alternative ed (not the ED class, though).
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    Gen Ed, with very severe behavioral issues is an oxymoron, IMHO. Once you get to SBI, you should also be talking IEP. Of course, you could just look at them as EBD in waiting or training. It is 'severe enough' when they are big enough or volatile enough to really hurt someone or themselves. THEN they get classified quickly.
     
  7. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    We have to fight to get a 1:1 with SPE students. I know our Gen Ed wouldn't get one without being put into SPE first.
     
  8. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    A few years ago, it got so overwhelming with one kiddo. I had to physically restrain him (all administrators go through yearly Crisis Prevention Institute Training). Thankfully, two other male teachers ran over to help me out. I'm only 5'5 and about 130 lbs and that boy must've been at least 5'9 and nearly 200 lbs. It was intense. We were able to get him out of our school after that incident, though, because he had planned to attack his teacher.
     
  9. Backroads

    Backroads Fanatic

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    Feb 14, 2018

    A few years' back I had a student who had a one-on-one aide (cutest student in the world!) for some severe issues. I see it now and then, but always for SPED kids, as far as I know.

    I concur, though: if you're general education and require a one-on-one, something needs to give.
     
  10. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Feb 14, 2018

    Back in 2008, Congress expanded the provisions of 504 to include students without IEPs, but meet certain new eligibility criteria such as diabetes, epilepsy, bipolar disorder, autism and others. Even a GATE student that has serious behavior issues connected with any of these conditions may qualify for a 504 Plan. Assertive parents and those with advocates are beginning to realize that this "loophole" can be used to secure a 1:1 aide for their child.
     

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