Non Renewal Confusion

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Sophitia, Apr 20, 2017.

  1. Sophitia

    Sophitia Rookie

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    Apr 20, 2017

    I'm not sure if anyone can help, but I feel really confused and frustrated.
    I came back from Korea in September and signed a contract at the school I'm at in September in a rural Wisconsin district. Most teachers signed and started in August. All has been going well until now. I've been getting good reviews, I'm on good terms with everyone, but this weekend I received a preliminary notice of non-renewal from him. He told me that since I did not technically begin at the beginning of the school year, my contract could not be renewed. I don't understand why a new contract can't just automatically be re-offered as the old contract I signed in September expires. He then informed me that he would put in a good word for me with the board, and that I would have to reapply for the position. He then stated that he told me this when I first applied, which he did not, or I would not have taken the position.

    I've been looking up to find anything on Wisconsin law regarding this (being forced to non-renew a teacher who started after the beginning of the year) but I have not seen anything. Should I resign without prejudice instead of opting for termination? Has anyone been in a similar circumstance? I feel very frustrated and confused by this. Should I even ask this principal for a letter of recommendation?
     
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  3. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Apr 20, 2017

    That's how things work in my district. If you're hired after the start of the year, you're automatically non-renewed at the end of the year and they have to repost the position. In cases where the P wants the new employee back, this is all really just a formality. The employee does have to reapply for the job, but the job is posted for two weeks (usually listed with a "qualified candidate under consideration" caveat), they don't interview anyone else, and then the original employee is offered the position again. In cases where the P wants to look into other options, other candidates are interviewed and the original employee is at risk for not getting the job back. I would ask your P for more details about what the process will look like and when you will be made aware of a final decision. If your P says he's putting in a good word for you, it sounds like he wants to keep you. I would definitely ask the P for a letter of recommendation just in case you end up needing it. I also would definitely not resign since it sounds like you have a good chance of being rehired. Even if you don't get rehired, in this case I don't think you would have to report that you were non-renewed on future job applications since it wasn't due to performance (instead where they ask reason for leaving, I would say, "temporary contract"). If you have a union, it's a good idea to ask them for advice as they'd be much more familiar with how things typically work in your specific district. If not, HR would be another resource.
     
  4. Sophitia

    Sophitia Rookie

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    Apr 20, 2017

    Thanks for posting this - It makes me feel a bit better. I talked to my school superintendent for clarification. She told me that I would need to check "non renewed" on my future applications on WECAN (the online system in Wisconsin) but that my reason would be budgetary reasons/temporary contract, not performance. I guess it just kind of concerns me I will forever have to explain that. Would it be inappropriate to ask the principal if he would disclose that I was non renewed if he was called as a reference? I have debated if I want to renew here at all, but the sting of non renewal still hurts.
     
  5. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    Apr 21, 2017

    It is becoming more of a standard practice to offer temporary or one-year contracts to late hires in the area where you are looking. My district had some issues with quality of candidates, so now they do this fairly regularly. This sounds more like a case of a temporary rather than a regular contract being issued. I would not resign based on this. You do have some risk depending upon other applicants, but if you are doing well, you also have a foot in the door.
     

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