No late homework.

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Peregrin5, Feb 24, 2017.

  1. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I used to be a proponent of allowing students to turn in late work, because I would rather that students learn the material than not. However what I was getting is students turning in everything at the very end and rushing through it, not really learning anything from it, and just "getting it done".

    I decided a change was needed when a sub told her that they didn't need to do the work I assigned in class because I would just let them turn it in late anyway. I don't think my 8th graders were taking advantage of this policy when I had them the past four year. The ones who took advantage of my late policy needed that late policy. However this year, the kids are smart enough and more experienced enough to know how to game the system. So I told them that whatever they get on their homework is final. No more late work would be accepted.

    Would you say that this is justified? I had some parents complain about the policy change and the kids were complaining a lot about it. I get that kids these days have a lot to do (many of them work jobs or do sports, or something else), but I think that this doesn't justify just never doing work.
     
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  3. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    What I would do is this: any homework that is not turned in will receive points deducted. Every day could be 10 %. (for example) Homework will not be accepted after the day you are reviewing for a test.
    For example: homework is due to today. After today you deduct a certain amount of points, for each day being late. Next Thursday you review for a test, and there's a test on Friday. If homework is not turned in by Thursday (beginning of the class), it will get 0 points.
    Or you can simply deduct 50 % of the points for being 1 day late, and after that you don't accept it at all.
     
  4. Bioguru

    Bioguru Companion

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    Our school policy is 1 day late = 20% off, 2 days late = 0%.
     
  5. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    This was the policy my high school teachers always had. Every day late was a letter grade off.
    I think it's totally justified. So they have a lot to do; big deal. Part of being a functional part of society is being able to prioritize and get your work done. School should be pretty high on the list of priorities or they're not going to pass.
     
  6. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I've had parents complain about homework being too much on busy nights. I truly don't care. I don't assign a lot of homework. Not every night and not time-consuming when I do. If your dance recital/football game/party/birthday dinner interferes with the homework, that is on you. If an emergency comes up, I'm okay with extensions.
     
  7. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Assuming the amount you are giving is reasonable, I have no issue with the no-late-homework policy. The point-docking system is a nice idea, too, but I believe in the school of thought that you either demand it on time or don't care when it's turned in. I don't fully understand the middle, or would want to deal with the hassle of deciding how late something is.
     
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  8. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Ah, the benefits of being elementary and thus homework not being graded except for as a "completes work on time" life skill grade.
     
  9. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Doesn't have to be elementary only. If the homework is worth doing it will be reflected in assessment grades. I couldn't care less when they do it.

    If the problem is they are turning in garbage and still doing great on their assessments I don't see what the problem is.
     
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  10. kaitydid

    kaitydid Rookie

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    I teach both middle and high school (small school setting), and I don't accept late work from any of those grades. I used to last year and even did the point reduction, but I felt like it created more work for me, so I decided not to accept any late work this year. In my eyes, if the student actually cared, the assignment would be turned in on time in the first place. I already give them a reasonable amount and plenty of time to get the work done, and I'm more than willing to be flexible if there's an emergency or if a student actually talks to me (very rarely does that happen), so it's not my problem when a student decides to be irresponsible and let the "fun" stuff be their priority.
     
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  11. msleep

    msleep Rookie

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    I used to grade homework. But then I realized that many students do not need the extra help. I now give them homework and instead of grading the HW, I give a HW quiz which is based on the material of the HW. Grades are better and students are doing better since they care about quiz grades. Also, grades are more accurate in reflecting what they know and don't know.
     
  12. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I tried doing the reduction of the grade thing, but with 200 students, I can't keep track of who turned in what, at what time, and who had an excused absence, and so on. My homework is only ever what we don't finish in class. I rarely give large homework assignments.

    The thing is that if I don't offer points for homework and classwork (part of the same category because it's usually the same stuff) then kids just don't do it. And they don't do well on assessments after the fact. Homework/classwork is only 15% of the grade in my class. Not enough to break you if you skip out on a few assignments, but if you decided to never do any homework/classwork it would reduce your grade by more than a letter grade, and rightfully so in my opinion.
     
  13. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    I don't like grade reduction in the form of 1 day late - 10% off, 2 days - 20%, etc. It's too much work for the teacher to figure out.

    I do like the idea of just one solid deduction. Even offering 50% or 25% credit for late homework would give kids some way to get a few points back.
     
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  14. MLB711

    MLB711 Comrade

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    This is what I do. If it is in class, on time, and complete, its worth 10 points. If it's not done, in your locker, or incomplete, it's worth 5 points. I rarely have kids with 0s for homework grades because they get the homework done as we go over it, then show it to me later in class.

    This works in my school because my students usually do their homework. I have tried this policy in high school and many students would never do their homework because they just could do it when we went over it.

    You're teaching 9th grade right? I think your late work policy is justified though. I would just keep it. They need to get in the habit of turning in all their work on time and making time for homework around extracurriculars.
     
  15. Teacher0909

    Teacher0909 Rookie

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    I love the idea of no late work! I've always accepted late work up to one day late and start grading at a 75. Even that's a headache because keeping up with who is late and who is absent, who is in ISS or OSS is just too time consuming. The thing I hate is that I plan homework with the intent of using it as a review the next day. I want the kids who actually put forth the effort to see if they understand the concepts because typically those standards are going to be on a test very soon. I can't do that if I'm giving students an opportunity to turn in late work. I think I'm going to no late work. I teach high school students. I often tell them, their high school years will teach them so many life skills that they'll carry with them forever. Learning to complete tasks on time is one they'll always have to do.
     
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  16. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    This is what I do -- late work is automatically 50%. Better than nothing, but a big enough cut to motivate most students to get work done on time.
     
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  17. 4SquareRubric

    4SquareRubric Rookie

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    I agree with RcokguyKev. Below high school level homework has shown to be of little effect on students. In high school it is minimum at best. There is zero reason for homework to be part of a grade. It would be like grading practice drills during a sports team practice. It just doesn't make any sense.
    If it's worth doing then students will do it. If it's worth doing then teachers will provide feedback on it. but mostly, it's a useless exercise.
    Family time, after school activities, relaxing, and hanging out with friends is a far better use of a students time after day taking classes. I'd suggest dropping it as a requirement all together.
    As an additional point, adults hand in things late and show up to meetings unprepared in the real world quite frequently. Homework doesn't prepare them for the real world in anyway.
     
  18. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I generally agree that there are better things for a kid to be doing than homework, but I want to interject a little.

    Students aren't always the best judge of whether something is "worth doing". The students that I know tend to decide to do or not do a thing based on other factors, like whether the thing is easy, how much time it will take, and how much thought and effort they will need to put into it. In certain content areas there are lots of standards that need to be practiced in order to be met. They aren't simply about memorization and regurgitation, nor are they completely about deep analysis. If a student doesn't practice how to do these things, then he will very likely struggle when it comes to the assessment. Teachers know these things, and that's when they encourage students to do additional practice work outside of class.

    I remember when I was first learning how to do scansion, which is where you figure out the rhythm of a line of poetry. I was doing it in a foreign language, not my native language. There were all sorts of rules about how certain syllables are long and some are short. Sometimes they are long or short by nature (they just are always long or short and that's that) and other times they are long or short because of the letters around them. It's a complicated mess of rules that can be hard to memorize, but once you get a feel for scanning poetry in this language, it starts to feel more natural and a lot easier. It becomes less about going through the checklist of what makes a syllable long or short and more about the sound and feel of a line. Not only does this process become easier, but it also becomes a lot faster. Being able to correctly and quickly scan poetry is a skill that takes practice and is not generally the kind of thing that someone learns by watching someone else do it or by trying it once or twice on their own during class. This is just one example of very many situations where repetitive practice can be exceedingly useful.

    Now, I am generally of the opinion that practice work shouldn't be graded or should be graded only for nominal points (as a sort of incentive for students to do it). I don't think that homework should be impacting a student's grade much or at all, certainly not more than about 5%.
     
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  19. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Your policy is completely reasonable and justified. I would leave wiggle room for the odd student who falls ill (with a doctor's note); otherwise, your thinking represents the kind of common sense pedagogy missing in education and parenting throughout this decaying nation of self-centered, self-indulging, and disconnected foolishness.

    Yeah....
     
  20. 4SquareRubric

    4SquareRubric Rookie

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    Yes, taken out of it's context that sentence does raise some questions. The point was that holding students to some higher standard that all assignments have to be handed in on time every time does not reflect the real world in which there is often plenty of room to justify why one did or did not complete something. Furthermore, the vast majority of homework is practice work and has even less relevancy. If students do not practice the skills taught there is still plenty of room to hold them accountable on real assessments.
     
  21. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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