New job opportunity

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Janjan1981, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. Janjan1981

    Janjan1981 Rookie

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    Oct 11, 2017

    Hi all...I was hoping for some wisdom because I’m not sure what to do. I just graduated and received my statement of eligibility to work in Florida. I began submitting my resume yesterday to both my school district (the county) and a local (successful) charter school. I prefer to work for the county but location is more important to me and the charter school had openings very near me while the local public elementary schools don’t.

    I immediately got a call from one of the elementary schools of the local charter and they want to interview me. I was very excited until I reached out to a friend whose daughter attends said school and her exact words were “I’m very happy with my daughter’s experience and education there, but the principal has a reputation for being mean, condescending, and wanting everything her way. She’s lost 10 teachers this year.” Hence the quick call back! :(

    Would you still interview if you were me? Would you accept the job offer if I get offered one?
     
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  3. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Oct 11, 2017

    Interviewing is an essential experience, as each one better prepares you for the next. I'd take the interview, though I'd pass on the job. This sort of principal is someone to avoid.

    As a rule, teacher-hating buffoons having nothing to offer the world beyond chaos and idiocy.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2017
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  4. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Oct 11, 2017

    I would go on the interview and make your own decision regarding the P. Parents do not work in the school can only speak about their child's experience. I would be more interested in the opinions of other teachers in the school.
     
  5. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Oct 12, 2017

    Many of our parents know exactly what is going on in our district, and some of those are often more informed than the teachers.

    When ten teachers leave a school because of the principal, stretching reality to the breaking point in an effort to explain the situation away only calls more attention to the problem.
     
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  6. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Oct 16, 2017

    I have seen admin considered tyrannical for merely having legitimate expectations. The 10 teachers leaving might not always be related to the principal.
     
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  7. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Aficionado

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    Oct 16, 2017

    I'd go on the interview and if they ask you if you have any questions, ask about the high rate of teacher turnover that you have heard about :whistle:
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 16, 2017

    Like others have said, I think that you should do the interview. Not only will it give you valuable interview experience (which is always good), but it will also give you an opportunity to make your own observations about admin. Different people have different experiences with and impressions of admin, and it's important to remember that one person's experience or impression may not match your own.

    I once had an amazing administrator, one of the best I've ever had (and I've had close to 20 direct supervising administrators in my 12 years or so teaching). I felt that he really supported me in general and went to bat for me on a big issue. My colleague down the hall had a completely different experience with him, hated him as much as a person could hate anyone, and still complains about the guy years later. If you took my word for it, you'd have really great, high expectations for that administrator, but your expectations would be much different if you only spoke with my colleague. Both our experiences were fair and legitimate, but they were completely and totally different.
     
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  9. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Aficionado

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    Oct 16, 2017

    Caesar, this is oh so true!

    I'm sure there are staff members out there who think I'm the bee's knees and others who can't stand me. I'd like to think they all love me, though! ;)
     
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  10. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    Oct 16, 2017

    My last school I was hired during a year when 17 teachers left. It was after the P's first year there. I did fine and mostly well my 3 years there. P was tasked with making a failing school better so naturally some teachers didn't like the changes and left. I lasted 3 years under the P but left when I realized the direction the school was going was no longer something I needed to be a part of. I'm sure that's exactly what those 17 teachers thought 3 years earlier. Nobody likes change, some stick it out and others leave for that and other various reasons.

    Go on the interview and learn more about the school while you are there. You are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you.
     
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  11. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    Oct 16, 2017

    Also I made sure I genuinely asked questions that were important to me to know about the school. I got very real when I asked these questions because honestly, I didn't want to work at a school that was similar to where I came from.
     
  12. freyahenderson

    freyahenderson New Member

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    Oct 19, 2017

    Before choose a Job everyone must study about the job details and your area of interest towards the field. Always try to choose interesting job field.
     
  13. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Oct 19, 2017

    Yes, but did ten teachers ever quit in a single year because of this administrator? That is telling.

    I have had the same experience as you, though, working with an administrator I admired and respected, while many other teachers hated her. Maybe most other teachers hated her. But no one actually left the school because of her—that takes a special skill set to pull off correctly.

    Now, I just want to know if she took the interview or the job?
     
  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 19, 2017

    Eh. In my district, some schools are very large. My own school has around 150 teachers. I honestly wouldn't even blink an eye at 10 teachers leaving and transferring elsewhere. Around here, typical attrition rates for teachers is probably in the 10-20% range at any given school, and that includes retirement, transferring to a school that's closer to home, switching to a position not available in your current school, wanting to get away from admin, following admin to a new school, and any number of other reasons that people might choose to leave their current school.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2017
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